2017-2018 Calendar

Course Descriptions

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

Explanation of course descriptions
On the following pages are brief outlines of the courses prescribed for students in the Faculty of Applied Science and Engineering, listed in alphabetical order of the prefixes. The suffix following the course number indicates the session in which the course is given; the second line of the description shows the program and year for which the course is prescribed, the number of hours of lectures, laboratory and tutorial work per week, and the weight units assigned to the course.

Sample

ECE461H1 S
Internetworking
IV- AECPEBASCC; IV - AECPEBASC, AEESCBASEC (elective) 3/3a/1a/0.50  

ECE:  Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering

461: Course number

H1:  Half course, St George Campus

S: A second-session (winter) course.

F would indicate a first-session or fall course;

F/S would indicate that the course given in the first session is repeated in the second session (a student may take one or the other, but not both); Y would indicate a course that continues
over both sessions, i.e., a year-long course.

For determination as to whether a course is considered core or a technical elective for your program, consult your program curriculum outline in Chapter 7.

3: three hours lectures/week

3a: 3 hours of laboratory occuring on alternating weeks

1a: 1 hour of tutorial occuring on alternating week

If a component of the course (ie lecture, laboratory or tutorial) timing is followed by an 'm', this means the component does not follow a weekly or alternating format.  The professor of the course will explain the timing of the component in class.

0.50: equals one half credit

In addition to the 100-, 200-, 300- and 400-series courses, this Calendar also lists courses in the 500- and 1000-series. The 500-series courses are undergraduate courses that are also intended for graduate students; 1000-series are graduate courses that are open to undergraduate students by permission.

Many course descriptions include a statement of exclusions, prerequisites and co-requisites. The absence of such a statement does not imply that the course does not have such conditions. In these statements, the oblique symbol (“/”) means “OR”, and the comma (“,”) means “AND”.

Any recommendation for textbooks should be considered as tentative only, and is subject to change. Students should therefore not purchase textbooks until they have been in attendance in the course, unless informed otherwise by their department.

Note: Selected Arts and Science courses appear in this calendar.  Requisite and exclusion information listed for Arts and Science course may not apply to Engineering students.   If you are unsure if you meet the requirement for a course you should speak with the Arts and Science department offering the course or your departmental counsellor.  Further, Breadth and Distribution requirements listed for Arts and Science courses apply only to students registered in the Faculty of Arts and Science and do not apply to students registered in the Faculty of Applied Science and Engineering.

For a complete course listing of Arts and Science courses please refer to the Arts and Science Academic Calendar.



Actuarial Science


ACT370H1 SFinancial Principles for Actuarial Science II

III-AEESCBASEF
3/-/-/0.50

Mathematical theory of financial derivatives, discrete and continuous option pricing models, hedging strategies and exotic option valuation.


Prerequisite: ACT240H1 (minimum grade C); ACT245H1 (minimum grade C); ACT247H1 (minimum grade C); (STA257H1,STA261H1); MAT237Y1/MAT257Y1
Exclusion: RSM435H1

ACT460H1 FStochastic Methods for Actuarial Science

IV-AEESCBASEF
3/-/-/0.50

Applications of the lognormal distribution, Brownian motion, geometric Brownian motion, martingales, Itos limma, stochastic differential equations, interest rate models, the Black-Scholes model, volatility, value at risk, conditional tail expectation.


Prerequisite: STA347H1 (required)/ ACT370H1 strongly recommended

Aerospace Science and Engineering


AER201H1 SEngineering Design

II-AEESCBASE
1/5/-/0.50

Design of integrated, multidisciplinary systems is introduced through a major course project. Project selection and definition of functions and performance objectives for the open-ended design problem will take place early on by teams of students, while learning practical subjects of engineering in lectures and workshops. This process will lead to the preparation of project proposals consisting of identification of design objectives and constraints, generation and evaluation of potential approaches, selection of the most promising design concept, identification of product subsystems, and assignment of responsibilities to team members. Following project approval, the design process will comprise preliminary design, followed by detailed design, prototype construction and testing, and preparation of a final design report. Progress is evaluated weekly, culminating in a prototype demonstration and design review.

 


Recommended Preparation: ESC102H1, CSC190H1 and ECE159H1
NOTE: AER201 includes a total of 33 hours of lecture. While there is 1 regular lecture hour per week, there are an additional 21 hours scheduled into the first 4 weeks of the course.

AER210H1 FVector Calculus & Fluid Mechanics

II-AEESCBASE
3/0.50/2/0.50

The first part of this course covers multiple integrals and vector calculus. Topics covered include: double and triple integrals, derivatives of definite integrals, surface area, cylindrical and spherical coordinates, general coordinate transformations (Jacobians), Taylor series in two variables, line and surface integrals, parametric surfaces, Green’s theorem, the divergence and gradient theorems, Stokes’s theorem. The second part of the course provides a general introduction to the principles of continuum fluid mechanics. The basic conservation laws are derived in both differential and integral form, and the link between the two is demonstrated. Applications covered include hydrostatics, incompressible and compressible frictionless flow, the speed of sound, the momentum theorem, viscous flows, and selected examples of real fluid flows.


Prerequisite: MAT195H1
Corequisite: MAT292H1
Exclusion: CHE211H1, CHE221H1, CME261H1, CME270H1, MAT291H1 or MIE312H1
Recommended Preparation: PHY180H1

AER301H1 FDynamics

III-AEESCBASEA, III-AEESCBASEZ,
I-AEMINRAM
3/-/1/0.50

Reference frames in relative translation and rotation, vector and matrix formulations. Dynamics of a single particle and of systems of particles. Lagrange’s equations. D’Alembert’s and Hamilton’s principle. Orbital dynamics. Rigid body kinematics and dynamics, Lagrangian approach to vibrations of complex systems. Model analysis. Primary Reference: class notes. Reference Books: Greenwood, Principles of Dynamics; Goldstein, Classical Mechanics.


Prerequisite: AER210H1, MAT185H1 and PHY180H1
Exclusion: MIE301H1

AER302H1 SAircraft Flight

III-AEESCBASEA, III-AEESCBASEZ
3/-/1/0.50

Basics of aircraft performance with an introduction to static stability and control. Topics covered include: Equations of Motion; Characteristics of the Atmosphere; Airspeed Measurement; Drag (induced drag, total airplane drag); Thurst and Power (piston engine characteristics, gas turbine performance); Climb (range payload); Tunrs; Pull-up; Takeoff; Landing (airborne distance, ground roll); Flight envelope (maneuvering envelope, gust load factors); Longitudinal and lateral static stability and control; Introduction to dynamic stability.


Prerequisite: AER307H1 and AER301H1

AER303H1 FAerospace Laboratory I

III-AEESCBASEA
-/1/-/0.15

Students will perform a number of experiments in the subject areas associated with the Aerospace Option curriculum, and prepare formal laboratory reports.


Corequisite: AER307H1

AER304H1 SAerospace Laboratory II

III-AEESCBASEA
-/1/-/0.15

Students will perform a number of experiments in the subject areas associated with the Aerospace Option curriculum, and prepare formal laboratory reports.


Corequisite: AER373H1

AER307H1 FAerodynamics

III-AEESCBASEA, III-AEESCBASEZ,
IV-AEMECBASC
3/-/1/0.50

Review of fundamentals of fluid dynamics, potential-flow, Euler, and Navier-Stokes equations; incompressible flow over airfoils, incompressible flow over finite wings; compressibility effects; subsonic compressible flow over airfoils; supersonic flow; viscous flow; laminar layers and turbulent boundary layers and unsteady aerodynamics. Textbook: Anderson, J.D., Fundamentals of Aerodynamics, 3rd Edition, McGraw Hill, 2001.


Prerequisite: AER210H1 or MIE312H1

AER310H1 SGasdynamics

III-AEESCBASEA
3/-/1/0.50

Basic introduction to compressible gasdynamics. Includes some fundamental thermodynamics, thermal and caloric equations of state, derivation of Euler’s equations by control volume approach. Also, includes the theory of steady flows in ducts with area changes, adiabatic frictional flows, duct flows with heat transfer, normal and oblique shock waves, Prandtl-Meyer expansion wave, moving shock and rarefaction waves, shock tubes, and wind tunnels. The lectures are supplemented by problem sets. Reference book: Anderson, J.D., Modern Compressible Flow with Historical Perspective.


Prerequisite: AER307H1

AER315H1 FCombustion Processes

III-AEESCBASEA
3/-/1/0.50

Scope and history of combustion, and fossil fuels; thermodynamics and kinetics of combustion including heats of formation and reaction, adiabatic flame temperature, elementary and global reactions, equilibrium calculations of combustion products, and kinetics of pollutant formation mechanisms; propagation of laminar premixed flames and detonations, flammability limits, ignition and quenching; gaseous diffusion flames and droplet burning; introduction to combustion in practical devices such as rockets, gas turbines, reciprocating engines, and furnaces; environmental aspects of combustion.


Prerequisite: CHE260H1
Exclusion: MIE516H1

AER336H1 SScientific Computing

III-AEESCBASEA, IV-AEESCBASEF,
IV-AEESCBASER, III-AEESCBASEZ
3/-/1/0.50

An introduction is provided to numerical methods for scientific computation which are relevant to the solution of a wide range of engineering problems. Topics addressed include interpolation, integration, linear systems, least-squares fitting, nonlinear equations and optimization, initial value problems, partial differential equations, and relaxation methods. The assignments make extensive use of MATLAB. Assignments also require knowledge of Fortran or C.


Prerequisite: ESC103H1 and MAT185H1

AER372H1 SControl Systems

III-AEESCBASEA, III-AEESCBASEJ,
III-AEESCBASEZ
3/1.50/1/0.50

An introduction to dynamic systems and control. Models of physical systems. Stability and feedback control theory. Analysis and synthesis of linear feedback systems by “classical” and state space techniques. Introduction to nonlinear and optimal control systems. Digital computer control. Multivariable feedback system design.


Prerequisite: MAT185H1 and MAT292H1
Exclusion: CHE322H1, ECE356H1 or MIE404H1

AER373H1 SMechanics of Solids and Structures

III-AEESCBASEA, III-AEESCBASEI
3/-/1/0.50

An Introduction to Solid and Structural Mechanics. Continuum Mechanics: Stress, strain and constitutive relations for continuous systems, Equilibrium equations, Force and Flexibility methods, Introduction to Cartesian Tensors. Variational Principles: Virtual Work, Complementary Virtual Work, Strain Energy and Work, Principle of Stationary Value of the Total Potential Energy, Complementary Potential Energy, Reissner’s Principle, Calculus of Variations, Hamilton’s Principle. Beam and Plate theory. Dynamics of discrete and continuous systems.


Prerequisite: CIV102H1

AER406H1 SAircraft Design

IV-AEESCBASEA
-/-/3/0.50

This course involves the detailed preliminary design of an airplane. Performance and mission specifications are given, as well as the engine’s characteristics. The class is divided into teams of three to four students who are guided to develop an airplane that can meet these specifications. Individual team members will specialize in areas such as “performance”, “structure”, “systems”, etc., although all team members should be conversant with each other’s results and methodology. Each week, a representative of each team presents a progress lecture on that team’s efforts, which is discussed and critiqued by the class. Also, the teams meet one-on-one with the professor and tutors to discuss specific design questions. At the end of the course each team will present a verbal and written report of sufficient detail to provide a compelling case for the feasibility of their proposed airplane. Text: Raymer, Daniel P., Aircraft Design: A Conceptual Approach, published by the AIAA.


Prerequisite: AER302H1, AER307H1 and AER373H1

AER407H1 FSpace Systems Design

IV-AEESCBASEA, III-AEESCBASEZ,
I-AEMINRAM
-/3/-/0.50

Introduction to the conceptual and preliminary design phases for a space system currently of interest in the Aerospace industry. A team of visiting engineers provide material on typical space systems design methodology and share their experiences working on current space initiatives through workshops and mock design reviews. Aspects of operations, systems, electrical, mechanical, software, and controls are covered. The class is divided into project teams to design a space system in response to a Request for Proposals (RFP) formulated by the industrial team. Emphasis is placed on standard top-down design practices and the tradeoffs which occur during the design process. Past projects include satellites such as Radarsat, interplanetary probes such as a solar sailer to Mars, a Mars surface rover and dextrous space robotic systems.



AER501H1 FComputational Structural Mechanics and Design Optimization

IV-AEESCBASEA
3/-/1/0.50

Introduction to the Finite Element Method and Structural Optimization. Review of linear elasticity: stress, strain and material constitutive laws, Variational Principles. The Finite Element technique: problem formulation - methods of Ritz and Galerkin, element properties - C0 and C1 formulations, static and dynamic problems: applications to bar, beam, membrane and plate problems. Structural Optimization: Overview of problems, Optimal Design problem formulation, solution strategies - gradient search techniques, Sensitivity analysis for static and dynamic problems, Optimization problems using commercial finite element codes. Text: Shames & Dym, Energy and Finite Element Methods in Structural Mechanics.


Prerequisite: AER373H1
Recommended Preparation: AER373H1

AER503H1 SAeroelasticity

IV-AEESCBASEA
3/-/1/0.50

Static aeroelastic phenomena are studied, including divergence of slender wings and control reversal. Various methods of solution are considered such as closed form, matrix format iteration and the Rayleigh-Ritz approach. A Study of vibration and flutter of wings and control surfaces is presented with particular emphasis on those parameters which affect flutter speed.


Prerequisite: AER307H1 and AER501H1

AER506H1 FSpacecraft Dynamics and Control

IV-AEESCBASEA
3/-/1/0.50

Planar “central force” motion; elliptical orbits; energy and the major diameter; speed in terms of position; angular momentum and the conic parameter; Kepler’s laws. Applications to the solar system; applications to Earth satellites. Launch sequence; attaining orbit; plane changes; reaching final orbit; simple theory of satellite lifetime. Simple (planar) theory of atmospheric entry. Geostationary satellite; adjustment of perigee and apogee; east-west stationkeeping. Attitude motion equations for a torque-free rigid body; simple spins and their stability; effect of internal energy dissipation; axisymmetric spinning bodies. Spin-stabilized satellites; long-term effects; sample flight data. Dual-spin satellites; basic stability criteria; example-CTS. “active” attitude control; reaction wheels; momentum wheels; controlmoment gyros; simple attitude control systems.


Prerequisite: AER301H1 and AER372H1

AER507H1 FIntroduction to Fusion Energy

I-AECERNUC, IV-AEESCBASEA,
IV-AEESCBASEJ, IV-AEESCBASEP,
IV-AEESCBASER, I-AEMINENR
3/-/1/0.50

Nuclear reactions between light elements provide the energy source for the sun and stars. On earth, such reactions could form the basis of an essentially inexhaustible energy resource. In order for the fusion reactions to proceed at a rate suitable for the generation of electricity, the fuels (usually hydrogen) must be heated to temperatures near 100 million Kelvin. At these temperatures, the fuel will exist in the plasma state. This course will cover: (i) the basic physics of fusion, including reaction cross-sections, particle energy distributions, Lawson criterion and radiation balance, (ii) plasma properties including plasma waves, plasma transport, heating and stability, and (iii) fusion plasma confinement methods (magnetic and inertial). Topics will be related to current experimental research in the field.



AER510H1 SAerospace Propulsion

IV-AEESCBASEA
3/-/1/0.50

Scope and history of jet and rocket propulsion; fundamentals of air-breathing and rocket propulsion; fluid mechanics and thermodynamics of propulsion including boundary layer mechanics and combustion; principles of aircraft jet engines, engine components and performance; principles of rocket propulsion, rocket performance, and chemical rockets; environmental impact of aircraft jet engines.


Prerequisite: AER310H1

AER521H1 SMobile Robotics and Perception

IV-AEESCBASEA, IV-AEESCBASER,
IV-AEESCBASEZ, I-AEMINRAM
3/1.50/1/0.50

The course addresses fundamentals of mobile robotics and sensor-based perception for applications such as space exploration, search and rescue, mining, self-driving cars, unmanned aerial vehicles, autonomous underwater vehicles, etc.  Topics include sensors and their principles, state estimation, computer vision, control architectures, localization, mapping, planning, path tracking, and software frameworks.  Laboratories will be conducted using both simulations and hardware kits.

Note: ROB310 will be a required prerequisite for AER521 in 2018-19.


Prerequisite: AER372H1

AER525H1 FRobotics

IV-AEESCBASEA, IV-AEESCBASER,
IV-AEMECBASC
3/1.50/1/0.50

The course addresses fundamentals of analytical robotics as well as design and control of industrial robots and their instrumentation. Topics include forward, inverse, and differential kinematics, screw representation, statics, inverse and forward dynamics, motion and force control of robot manipulators, actuation schemes, task-based and workspace design, mobile manipulation, and sensors and instrumentation in robotic systems. A series of experiments in the Robotics Laboratory will illustrate the course subjects.


Prerequisite: AER301H1 and AER372H1
Exclusion: ECE470H1

Anthropology


ANT204H1 FAnthropology of the Contemporary World (formerly ANT204Y1)

I-AECERGLOB
-/-/-/0.50

A course focused on recent anthropological scholarship that seeks to understand and explain the transformation of contemporary societies and cultures. Topics may include some of the following: new patterns of global inequality, war and neo-colonialism, health and globalization, social justice and indigeneity, religious fundamentalism, gender inequalities, biotechnologies and society etc.


Exclusion: ANT204Y1
Recommended Preparation: ANT100Y1

Applied Mathematics


APM384H1 FPartial Differential Equations

III,IV-AECPEBASC, III,IV-AEELEBASC,
III-AEESCBASEA, III-AEESCBASEF,
III-AEESCBASEP, IV-AEESCBASER,
IV-AEESCBASET, III-AEESCBASEZ
3/-/1/0.50

Boundary value problems and Sturm-Liouville theory for ordinary differential equations. Partial differential equations of first order, characteristics,Hamilton-Jacobi theory. Diffusion equations; Laplace transform methods. Harmonic functions, Green’s functions for Laplace’s equation, surface and volume distributions; Fourier transforms. Wave equation, characteristics; Green’s functions for the wave equation; Huygens principle.



APM446H1 SApplied Nonlinear Equations

IV-AEESCBASEA
3/-/-/0.50

Partial differential equations appearing in physics, material sciences, biology, geometry, and engineering. Nonlinear evolution equations. Existence and long-time behaviour of solutions. Existence of static, traveling wave, self-similar, topological and localized solutions. Stability. Formation of singularities and pattern formation. Fixed point theorems, spectral analysis, bifurcation theory. Equations considered in this course may include: Allen-Cahn equation (material science), Ginzburg-Landau equation (condensed matter physics), Cahn-Hilliard (material science, biology), nonlinear Schroedinger equation (quantum and plasma physics, water waves, etc). mean curvature flow (geometry, material sciences), Fisher-Kolmogorov-Petrovskii-Piskunov (combustion theory, biology), Keller-Segel equations (biology), and Chern-Simmons equations (particle and condensed matter physics).


Prerequisite: APM346H1/MAT351Y1

APM466H1 SMathematical Theory of Finance

IV-AEESCBASEF
3/-/-/0.50

Introduction to the basic mathematical techniques in pricing theory and risk management: Stochastic calculus, single-period finance, financial derivatives (tree-approximation and Black-Scholes model for equity derivatives, American derivatives, numerical methods, lattice models for interest-rate derivatives), value at risk, credit risk, portfolio theory.


Prerequisite: APM346H1, STA347H1
Corequisite: STA457H1

Applied Science and Engineering (Interdepartmental)


APS100H1 FOrientation to Engineering

I-AECHEBASC, I-AECIVBASC,
I-AECPEBASC, I-AEELEBASC,
I-AEENGBASC, IV-AEESCBASEP,
I-AEINDBASC, I-AELMEBASC,
I-AEMECBASC, I-AEMMSBASC
1a/-/1/0.25

This course is designed to help students transition into first-year engineering studies and to develop and apply a greater understanding of the academic learning environment, the field of engineering, and how the fundamental mathematics and sciences are used in an engineering context.  Topics covered include: study skills, time management, problem solving, successful teamwork, effective communications, exam preparation, stress management and wellness, undergraduate research, extra- and co-curricular involvement, engineering disciplines and career opportunities, and applications of math and science in engineering.



APS105H1 SComputer Fundamentals

I-AECPEBASC, I-AEELEBASC,
I-AEENGBASC
3/2m/1m/0.50

An introduction to computer systems and problem solving using computers. Topics include: the representation of information, programming techniques, programming style, basic loop structures, functions, arrays, strings, pointer-based data structures and searching and sorting algorithms. The laboratories reinforce the lecture topics and develops essential programming skills.



APS106H1 SFundamentals of Computer Programming

I-AECHEBASC, I-AECIVBASC,
I-AEINDBASC, I-AELMEBASC,
I-AEMECBASC, I-AEMMSBASC
3/2/1/0.50

An introduction to computer systems and software. Topics include the representation of information, algorithms, programming languages, operating systems and software engineering. Emphasis is on the design of algorithms and their implementation in software. Students will develop a competency in the C programming language. Laboratory exercises will explore the concepts of both Structure-based and Object-Oriented programming using examples drawn from mathematics and engineering applications.



APS110H1 FEngineering Chemistry and Materials Science

I-AECPEBASC, I-AEELEBASC,
I-AEENGBASC, I-AEMMSBASC
3/1/1/0.50

This course is structured around the principle of the structure-property relationship. This relationship refers to an understanding of the microstructure of a solid, that is, the nature of the bonds between atoms and the spatial arrangement of atoms, which permits the explanation of observed behaviour. Observed materials behaviour includes mechanical, electrical, magnetic, optical, and corrosive behaviour. Topics covered in this course include: structure of the atom, models of the atom, electronic configuration, the electromagnetic spectrum, band theory, atomic bonding, optical transparency of solids, magnetic properties, molecular bonding, hybridized orbitals, crystal systems, lattices and structures, crystallographic notation, imperfections in solids, reaction rates, activation energy, solid-state diffusion, materials thermodynamics, free energy, and phase equilibrium.



APS111H1 FEngineering Strategies & Practice I

I-AECHEBASC, I-AECIVBASC,
I-AECPEBASC, I-AEELEBASC,
I-AEENGBASC, I-AEINDBASC,
I-AELMEBASC, I-AEMECBASC,
I-AEMMSBASC
3/1/1/0.50
This course introduces and provides a framework for the design process. Students are introduced to communication as an integral component of engineering practice. The course is a vehicle for understanding problem solving and developing communications skills. This first course in the two Engineering Strategies and Practice course sequence introduces students to the process of engineering design, to strategies for successful team work, and to design for human factors, society and the environment. Students write team and individual technical reports and give presentations within a discussion group.

APS112H1 SEngineering Strategies & Practice II

I-AECHEBASC, I-AECIVBASC,
I-AECPEBASC, I-AEELEBASC,
I-AEENGBASC, I-AEINDBASC,
I-AELMEBASC, I-AEMECBASC,
I-AEMMSBASC
2/2/-/0.50

This course introduces and provides a framework for the design process, problem solving and project management. Students are introduced to communication as an integral component of engineering practice. The course is a vehicle for practicing team skills and developing communications skills. Building on the first course, this second course in the two Engineering Strategies and Practice course sequence introduces students to project management and to the design process in greater depth. Students work in teams on a term length design project. Students will write a series of technical reports and give a team based design project presentation.



APS160H1 FMechanics
-/-/-/0.50

The principles of statics are applied to composition and resolution of forces, moments and couples. The equilibrium states of structures are examined. Throughout, the free body diagram concept is emphasized. Vector algebra is used where it is most useful, and stress blocks are introduced. Shear force diagrams, bending moment diagrams and stress-strain relationships for materials are discussed. Stress and deformation in axially loaded members and flexural members (beams) are also covered.


Exclusion: CIV100H1
Available Online: consult Faculty or Graduate Unit for details

APS161H1 F/SDynamics
-/-/-/0.50

This course on Newtonian mechanics considers the interactions which influence 2-D, curvilinear motion. These interactions are described in terms of the concepts of force, work, momentum and energy. Initially the focus is on the kinematics and kinetics of particles. Then, the kinematics and kinetics of systems of particles and solid bodies are examined. Finally, simple harmonic motion is discussed. The occurrence of dynamic motion in natural systems, such as planetary motion, is emphasized. Applications to engineered systems are also introduced.


Exclusion: MIE100H1
Available Online: consult Faculty or Graduate Unit for details

APS162H1 F/SCalculus for Engineers I
-/-/-/0.50

This online-only course focuses on the fundamental tools of calculus and its connections to engineering.  The topics include limits, differentiation, graphing, optimization problems, and definite and indefinite integrals.  Problems combining calculus with geometry, linear algebra, statics, and mechanics will be examined.


Exclusion: MAT186H1/MAT196H1
Available Online: consult Faculty or Graduate Unit for details

APS163H1 F/SCalculus for Engineers II
-/-/-/0.50

This online-only course focuses on the fundamental tools of calculus and its connections to engineering.  The topics include methods of integration, an introduction to differential equations, series and Taylor series, vector differentiation, and partial differentiation.  Problems combining calculus with geometry, linear algebra, statics, and mechanics will be examined.


Prerequisite: APS162H1/MAT186H1
Exclusion: MAT187H1/MAT197H1
Available Online: consult Faculty or Graduate Unit for details

APS164H1 SIntroductory Chemistry from a Materials Perspective
-/-/-/0.50

This online course is structured around the principle of structure-property relationship. This relationship refers to an understanding of the microstructure of a solid, that is, the nature of the bonds between atoms and the spatial arrangement of atoms, which permits the explanation of observed behaviour. Observed materials behaviour includes mechanical, electrical, magnetic, optical, and corrosive behaviour. Topics covered in this course include: structure of the atom, models of the atom, electronic configuration, the electromagnetic spectrum, band theory, atomic bonding, optical transparency of solids, magnetic properties, molecular bonding, hybridized orbitals, crystal systems, lattices and structures, crystallographic notation, imperfections in solids, reaction rates, activation energy, solid-state diffusion, materials thermodynamics, free energy, and phase equilibrium.


Available Online: consult Faculty or Graduate Unit for details

APS191H1 SIntroduction to Engineering

I-AEENGBASC
1/-/-/0.15

This is a seminar series that will preview the core fields in Engineering. Each seminar will highlight one of the major areas of Engineering. The format will vary and may include application examples, challenges, case studies, career opportunities, etc. The purpose of the seminar series is to provide first year students with some understanding of the various options within the Faculty to enable them to make educated choices for second year. This course will be offered on a credit/no credit basis.



APS234H1 FEntrepreneurship and Small Business

I-AECERENTR, I-AEMINBUS
4/-/1/0.50

Complementary Studies elective

Part 1 of the 2 Part Entrepreneurship Program
The age of enterprise has arrived. Strategic use of technology in all sorts of businesses makes the difference between success and failure for these firms. Wealth creation is a real option for many and the business atmosphere is ready for you! Increasingly, people are seeing the advantages of doing their own thing, in their own way, in their own time. Entrepreneurs can control their own lives, structure their own progress and be accountable for their own success - they can fail, but they can not be fired! After all, engineers are the most capable people to be in the forefront of this drive to the business life of the next century. This course is the first of a series of two dealing with entrepreneurship and management of a small company. It is intended that the student would continue to take the follow up course APS432 as s/he progresses toward the engineering degree. Therefore, it is advisable that the descriptions of both courses be studied prior to deciding to take this one. This is a limited enrolment course. If the number of students electing to take the course exceeds the class size limit, selection of the final group will be made on the basis of the “Entrepreneur’s Test”. There will be a certificate awarded upon the successful completion of both courses attesting to the fact that the student has passed this Entrepreneurial Course Series at the University of Toronto. The course is based on real life issues, not theoretical developments or untried options. Topics covered include: Who is an entrepreneur; Canadian business environment; Acquisitions; Different business types (retail, wholesale, manufacturing, and services); Franchising; Human resources, Leadership, Business law; and many others. Several visitors are invited to provide the student with the opportunity to meet real entrepreneurs. There will be several assignments and a session project. It should be noted that the 5 hours per week would all be used for whatever is needed at the time, so tutorials will not normally happen as the calendar indicates them.


Exclusion: CHE488H1/CIV488H1/ECE488H1/MIE488H1/MSE488H1

APS281H1 SLanguage and Meaning

I-AECERCOM
2/-/2/0.50

Humanities and Social Science elective

As students study how language is used to make meaning in diverse contexts they will hone their own skills in deploying written and oral professional engineering language. The course explores the nature of language across linguistic, discipline and cultural boundaries and students apply the theoretical knowledge of language and language learning to their own written and oral language performances. In conjunction with this, theories of translation and bilingualism will be introduced to challenge assumptions about the universality of meanings. Weekly lecture and tutorial.



APS299Y0 YSummer Research Abroad
-/7/-/1.00

An independent research project conducted in an engineering laboratory at an approved partner institution abroad for 10-16 weeks in the summer term. This course is intended for students who will have completed their 2nd or 3rd year of study by the time they take the course.  Students must apply for this program through the Centre for International Experience in the fall term and will be notified by January if they are accepted.  Students should inquire with their home department to determine whether the course can count towards their degree requirements.  For more information, please contact the Cross-Disciplinary Programs Office at cdp@ecf.utoronto.ca


Prerequisite: Pre-requisite: Students must have a cGPA of at least 3.0 and permission of their department.

APS301H1 FTechnology in Society and the Biosphere I

II-AECIVBASC, IV-AEESCBASEI,
I-AEMINENR, I-AEMINENV
3/-/1/0.50

Humanities and Social Science Elective
This course teaches future engineers to look beyond their specialized domains of expertise in order to understand how technology functions within human life, society and the biosphere. By providing this context for design and decision-making, students will be enabled to do more than achieve the desired results by also preventing or significantly reducing undesired consequences. A more preventively-oriented mode of practicing engineering will be developed in four areas of application: materials and production, energy, work and cities. The emphasis within these topics will reflect the interests of the class.



APS302H1 STechnology in Society and the Biosphere II
3/-/1/0.50

Humanities and Social Science Elective
This course examines the interactions between advanced technology and human life, society and the biosphere. Topics include: industrialization and the birth of rationality and technique; the computer and information revolution as symptom of a deeper socio-cultural transformation; other “post-industrial” phenomena; the transition from experience to information; technique as social force, life-milieu and system; and living with complex socio-technical systems.


Prerequisite: APS301H1/APS203H1/APS103H1

APS304H1 SPreventive Engineering and Social Development
3/-/1/0.50

Humanities and Social Science Elective
The present intellectual and professional division of labour makes it next to impossible for specialists to deal with the consequences of their decisions that fall beyond their domains of expertise, thus institutionalizing an end-of-pipe approach to the many problems created by contemporary civilization. To turn this situation around, preventive approaches have been developed that use the understanding of how technology interacts with human life, society and the biosphere to adjust decision-making in order to achieve the desired results while at the same time preventing or reducing undesired effects. These preventive approaches can transform our materials and production systems, energy systems, workplaces and urban habitats to make contemporary ways of life more economically sound, socially viable and environmentally sustainable.


Prerequisite: APS301H1/APS203H1/APS103H1, APS302H1

APS305H1 SEnergy Policy

III-AEESCBASEJ, I-AEMINENR
3/-/1/0.50

Complimentary Studies Elective
Core Course in the Sustainable Energy Minor
Introduction to public policy including the role and interaction of technology and regulation, policy reinforcing/feedback cycles; procedures for legislation and policy setting at the municipal, provincial and federal levels; dimensions of energy policy; energy planning and forecasting including demand management and conservation incentives; policy institution, analysis, implementation, evaluation and evolution; Critical analyses of case studies of energy and associated environmental policies with respect to conservation and demand management for various utilities and sectors; policy derivatives for varied economic and social settings, developing countries and associated impacts.


Exclusion: ENV350H1

APS310H0 FDefining Energy Futures in India and Canada
3/1/-/0.50

Complimentary Studies Elective

The future of energy systems in India and Canada.   A spectrum of current and emerging technologies used in providing energy and in its end use, including but not limited to electricity generation and transportation systems, are compared and contrasted re their applicability and barriers.  Energy issues and challenges across the two countries; the role of energy in economic growth and in reducing poverty.  Multi-variable analytic approach:  technical aspects of the energy systems at an intermediate level of depth, but also economic analysis, environmental and sustainability issues, and social benefits.   Case study examples of organizations bringing these technologies into use.   India and Canada respectively in a global energy context relative to China, the U.S. and the Middle Eastern countries.   Developing a framework for broader assessment of the context of engineering work – how engineering solutions and practices vary depending on the setting where the solutions are used.   Possible collaborations between India and Canada, and between universities in the two countries, are explored.

Offered through Summer Abroad Program. Duration of the course will be two to three calendar weeks, comprising approximately 42 hours of classroom instruction (up to 7 hours per day) and at least 3 field trips totaling 10 hours of instruction time.  Total of 52 hours of instruction scheduled over 2-3 weeks.

This course is not offered in 2015-16.


Exclusion: APS510H1

APS320H1 FRepresenting Science on Stage

I-AECERCOM
2/-/2/0.50

Humanities and Social Science elective

An examination of representations of science/scientists in theatre. Reading and/or viewing of works by contemporary playwrights and related materials on science and culture. Critical essays; in-class discussion and scene study.



APS321H1 FRepresenting Science and Technology in Popular Media

I-AECERCOM
2/-/2/0.50

Humanities and Social Science elective

This course analyzes popular scientific communication critically,  starting by establishing a historical and theoretical foundation for understanding the complex relationship between science and the public. We apply this theoretical foundation to contemporary case studies in multiple media (mis)representations of climate, environmental, and biomedical sciences, as well as breakthroughs in engineering.  We develop rhetorical strategies for delivering technical information to non-technical readers, including narrative and metaphor.


Prerequisite: CHE299H1/CHE397H1/ECE297H1/ECE299H1/ESC201H1/MSE390H1

APS322H1 SLanguage and Power

I-AECERCOM
2/-/2/0.50

Humanities and Social Science elective

This course explores Rhetoric historically to understand its development and practically to understand how ideas are constructed, disseminated, shared or imposed. The course explores worldview – the organizing structure by which we view the world – to position the student as rhetorically effective in multiple contexts. Students analyze political, cultural, and scientific discourse from great speeches to advertising to research papers. Students develop their rhetorical, communication, and persuasive abilities. 



APS325H1 FEngineering and Science in the Arts

I-AECERCOM
2/-/2/0.50

Humanities and Social Science elective

This course examines the connections between engineers, scientists, and artists. Taking examples from architecture, sculpture, painting, and the performing arts, this course will show how these artistic disciplines have grown through their interplay with engineering and science.

Not Offered in 2015/16.



APS343H1 F/SEngineering Leadership

I-AECERLEAD, I-AEMINBUS
1/2/-/0.50

Complementary Studies elective

This course is a practical approach to being a more productive engineer based on the premise that for technology to become a reality it must be translated through people.  A key is to understand that engineers lead in ways that reflect their skills and mind set.  The course begins with examining: 1) the meaning of leading (Why do something?); 2) the processes of leading (How do you do you create a vision and motivate others?); and 3) the tools of leading (What steps do you take to lead?).  Learning frameworks and personal working styles inventories provide practical tools to assist the student to understand human nature and the logic of learning to become a competent leader of self, teams and organizations.  The student prepares to become a competent leader by undertaking to learn (understand and integrate) key skills, character attributes and purposeful behaviours.  The course presents strategies for development of high performance teams.  Special attention is given to a number of subjects: transformational change, organizational culture, high performance work systems, and self-leadership.  The course material is delivered through lectures, readings, in-class discussion and a team project.  The project is based on the team interviewing the CEO of an engineering-intensive company or senior leader in the community.  Students will be required to submit written reflections on course content and their personal experience.



APS432H1 SEntrepreneurship and Business Management

I-AECERENTR, I-AEMINBUS
4/-/1/0.50

Complementary Studies elective

Part 2 of the 2 Part Entrepreneurship Program


This is part two of the Entrepreneurship course series. The student considering taking this course would typically plan to pursue a career in small business started by him/herself, or in a family enterprise. The skills acquired, however, are very useful in any business where a graduate might end up in his/her career, without the need for actually being an entrepreneur. Our approach to teaching is based on real-life business experiences and many years of successful practice of “what we preach”. The course contains very little theoretical work or academic approaches. It is designed to familiarise you with the kinds of opportunities (problems) likely to be encountered in an entrepreneurial career. If you really want this lifestyle and are prepared to work hard, we will provide you with the practical knowledge and technical skills required to pursue this kind of career. Topics covered in this course include: Marketing and Sales; Legal issues; Financing the business; Human Resources challenges, the Business Plan and many other issues. Note that the course material may be adjusted between the two courses as required. We recognize the value of communication skills in both the classroom and in project reports. In fact, we require that you learn how to present yourself in a business-like manner. As and when appropriate, outside visitors from the business community will join in and contribute to the class discussions. The course deals with practical concepts, actual past and current events and is presented from the point of view of someone who has “done it all”. This means that what you hear is the real stuff. There will be several assignments and the preparation of a full Business Plan as the session project. It should be noted that the 5 hours per week would all be used for whatever is needed at the time, so tutorials will not normally happen as the calendar indicates them.


Prerequisite: APS234 - Entrepreneurship and Small Business
Exclusion: CHE488H1/CIV488H1/ECE488H1/MIE488H1/MSE488H1

APS420H1 STechnology, Engineering and Global Development

I-AECERGLOB, I-AEMINBUS,
I-AEMINENV
3/-/-/0.50

Humanities and Social Science Elective

The role of technology and engineering in global development is explored through a combination of lectures, readings, case studies, and analysis of key technologies, including energy, information and communications technologies, water and healthcare.  Topics include a brief history and basic theories of international development and foreign aid, major government and non-government players, emerging alternative models (social entrepreneurship, microfinance, risk capital approaches), major and emerging players in social venture capital and philanthropy, the role of financial markets, environmental and resource considerations/sustainable development, technology diffusion models and appropriate technologies.


Exclusion: APS520H1

APS442H1 SCognitive and Psychological Foundations of Effective Leadership

I-AECERLEAD, I-AEMINBUS
3/-/-/0.50

Complementary Studies elective

This course investigates the cognitive and psychological foundations of effective leadership. Students will explore current theories driving effective leadership practice including models of leadership, neurophysiological correlates of leadership and psychodynamic approaches to leadership. Students will learn and apply skills including mental modeling, decision-making, teamwork and self-evaluation techniques. This course is aimed at helping Engineering students to gain practical skills that will enhance their impact as leaders throughout their careers.



APS444H1 FPositive Psychology for Engineers

I-AECERLEAD, I-AEMINBUS
3/-/-/0.50

Humanities and Social Science elective

Many disciplines have explored happiness - philosophy, anthropology, psychology, sociology, neurobiology, film, art and literature - to name a few.  Why not engineering?  During the first part of the course we will play catch-up, examining the scholarly and creative ways that people have attempted to understand what makes for a happy life.  Then we turn our attention to our own domain-expertise, applying engineering concepts like “balance”, “flow”, “amplitude”, “dynamic equilibrium””momentum” and others to explore the ways that your technical knowledge can contribute to a deep understanding of happiness.  This course is designed to challenge you academically as we analyze texts from a variety of disciplines, but it is also designed to challenge you personally to explore happiness as it relates to yourself, your own personal development and your success and fulfillment as an engineer.

If the number of students electing to take the course exceeds the class size limit, selection of the final group will be made on the basis of an in-class assessment completed during the first class.



APS445H1 FThe Power of Story: Discovering Your Leadership Narrative

I-AECERCOM, I-AECERLEAD,
I-AEMINBUS
2/-/1/0.50

Humanities and Social Science elective

This course offers an introduction to relational, authentic and transformational leadership theory by focusing on narrative and the power of story telling. Students will practice story-telling techniques by learning about the mechanics of stories, improve their public speaking by engaging in regular storytelling practice, explore their personal history by reflecting on their identities, and develop critical thinking skills regarding the stories (meta-narratives) that surround us, particularly as they relate to engineering problems/ethics. This is a highly experiential course with a focus on reading, discussion, practice and reflection.



APS446H1 SLeadership in Project Management

I-AECERLEAD, I-AEMINBUS
3/-/-/0.50

Complementary Studies elective

Project management involves both leading people and managing resources to achieve the intended project outcomes and benefits. Leadership is often the difference between project success and failure. The objective of this course is to equip you with the concepts, tools and techniques for effective leadership within a project context. It is also intended to build self-knowledge regarding leadership styles and to provide for opportunities for practice. The course begins with the organizational setting for projects, proceeds through aspects of leading and working with teams, covers the important topic of ethical leadership, and closes with the stakeholder, communication and change management components of leading projects in organizations.



APS447H1 SThe Art of Ethical & Equitable Decision Making in Engineering

I-AECERLEAD
3/-/-/0.50

The primary objective of this course is to help engineering students navigate the ambiguous world of engineering ethics and equity using case studies drawn from the careers of Canadian engineers. In addition to being exposed to a range of ethical theories, the PEO code of ethics and the legal context of engineering ethics, students enrolled in this course will engage in ethical decision-making on a weekly basis.



APS490Y1 YMulti-Disciplinary Capstone Design
-/-/3/1.00

An experience in multi-disciplinary engineering practice through a significant, open-ended, client-driven design project in which student teams address stakeholder needs through the use of a creative and iterative design process. 


Prerequisite: Permission of student's home department
Exclusion: CHE430Y1/CIV498H1/MIE490Y1/MIE491Y1/ECE496Y1/ ESC470H1/ESC471H1/ESC472H1/MSE498Y1

APS502H1 FFinancial Engineering

IV-AEINDBASC, I-AEMINBUS
3/-/-/0.50

This course will focus on capital budgeting, financial optimization, and project evaluation models and their solution techniques. In particular, linear, non-linear, and integer programming models and their solutions techniques will be studied. The course will give engineering students a background in modern capital budgeting and financial techniques that are relevant in practival engineering and commercial settings.


Prerequisite: MAT186H1, MAT187H1, MAT188H1, MIE236H1, MIE237H1, or equivalent.
Exclusion: MIE375H1

APS510H1 FInnovative Technologies and Organizations in Global Energy Systems

I-AECERGLOB, I-AEMINBUS,
I-AEMINENR
3/-/1/0.50

Complementary Studies elective

A broad range of global energy systems are presented including electricity generation, electricity end use, transportation and infrastructure.  Discussions are based on two key trends: (a) the increasing ability to deploy technologies and engineering systems globally, and (b) innovative organizations, many driven by entrepreneurship (for profit and social) and entrepreneurial finance techniques. The course considers these types of innovations in the context of developed economies, rapidly developing economies such as India and China, and the developing world. The course will interweave a mix of industry examples and more in-depth case studies.  The examples and cases are examined with various engineering, business and environmental sustainability analysis perspectives.


Prerequisite: Undergraduate economics course
Exclusion: APS310H1

APS530H1 SAppropriate Technology & Design for Global Development

I-AECERGLOB, I-AEMINENR,
I-AEMINENV
3/-/-/0.50

Engineering design within the context of global society, emphasizing the needs of users in order to support appropriate, sustainable technology.    A design project will comprise the major component of the course work.  The course will take the approach of “design for X”.   Students are expected to be familiar with design for functionality, safety, robustness, etc.  This course will extend the students’ understanding of design methodologies to design for “appropriateness in developing regions”.   Readings and discussions will explore the social, cultural, economic, educational, environmental and political contexts in which third world end users relate to technology.   Students will then incorporate their deepened understanding of this context in their design project.   The projects will be analyzed for functionality as well as appropriateness and sustainability in the third world context.   Upon completion of the course, students should have a deeper appreciation of the meaning of appropriate technology in various international development sectors such as healthcare, water & sanitation, land management, energy, infrastructure, and communications in both urban and rural settings.



APS540H1 SMaking Sense of Accidents

I-AECERFORE
3/1/-/0.50

Despite the best of engineering practices, spectacular failures of complex technological systems occur regularly. Traditional engineering explanations for the causes of accidents utilize eventchain models and often blame operators. This course highlights the limitations of such models and shows that accidents in sociotechnical systems can be better understood using systems engineering. Further insights are provided by reviewing various sociological theories that have been advanced to explain and prevent accidents.


Astronomy and Astrophysics


AST320H1 SIntroduction to Astrophysics

IV-AEESCBASEP
2m/-/-/0.50

The formation, equilibrium and evolution of structure on all astronomical scales from the largest to the smallest: universe, clusters of galaxies, galaxies, clusters of stars, gas clouds and stars.


Prerequisite: PHY252H1/PHY294H1; AST221H1,AST222H1 (or equivalent AST readings; consult the instructor)

AST325H1 FIntroduction to Practical Astronomy

IV-AEESCBASEP
-/3m/-/0.50

Through experiment and observation, develop the core skills to collect, reduce, and interpret astronomical data.  Develop understanding and usage of telescopes, instruments, and detectors; reduction and analysis methods; simulations and model fitting; data and error analysis.


Prerequisite: AST221H1,AST222H1 (or equivalent readings, consult the instructor)
Exclusion: AST326Y1
Recommended Preparation: basic programming/scripting, numerical techniques (e.g., through CSC108H1/CSC148H1, CSC260H1).

Biochemistry


BCB420H1 SComputational Systems Biology

I-AEMINBIO
2/-/2/0.50

Current approaches to using the computer for analyzing and modeling biology as integrated molecular systems. Lectures plus hands-on practical exercises. The course extends and complements an introductory Bioinformatics course, such as BCH441H1.


Prerequisite: BCH441H1/CSB472H1 or permission of the course coordinator

BCH441H1 FBioinformatics

I-AEMINBIO
2/-/1/0.50

This course is an introduction to computational methods and internet resources in modern biochemistry and molecular biology. The main topics include: sequence and genome databases, sequence alignment and homology search, use and interpretation of molecular structure, and phylogenetic analysis. Assignments focus on hands-on competence building with web-based bioinformatics tools and databases, downloadable software including a molecular viewer and a multiple sequence alignment editor, and the statistics workbench and programming language “R”. For syllabus details see: www.biochemistry.utoronto.ca/undergraduates/courses/BCH441H/

Note BCB420H1 extends this syllabus to computational topics of systems biology.


Prerequisite: BCH210H1/BCH242Y1; BCH311H1/MGY311Y1/PSL350H1 or special permission of the course coordinator

Biomaterials and Biomedical Engineering


BME205H1 SBiomolecules and Cells

II-AEESCBASE, I-AEMINBIO
2/1.50/1/0.50

Introducution to fundamental concepts in cell and molecular biology from a quantitative perspective. Emphasis is placed on the structure and function of biomolecules and cells.  Topics include biochemical processes in the cell, modern techniques in cell and molecular biology, and cellular mechanisms as related to tissue engineering and biotechnological applications.


Exclusion: CHE353H1 or BIO130H1

BME225H1 SDesign of Experiments
3/-/3/0.50

Students will use the application of statistical methods to design, develop, improve biomedical devices and bioprocesses or to demonstrate the efficacy of medical treatments. Topics that will be covered include statistical distributions, the central limit theorem, linear functions of random variables and error propagation, statistical inference, analysis of variance, empirical model building (multiple regression) and design of experiments (screening designs, blocking, fractional factorial designs) since these are the techniques that are the most commonly used by practicing engineers. The students will also be expected to become proficient in the use of statistical software to analyse experimental data.


Exclusion: CHE223H1, MIE231H1, MSE238H1

BME344H1 FModeling, Dynamics, and Control of Biological Systems

III-AEESCBASET
3/-/1/0.50

Introduction to modeling of physiological control systems present in the human body, combining physiology, linear system modeling and linear control theory. Topics include: representation of physical systems using differential equations and linearization of these dynamic models; graphical representation of the control systems/plants; Laplace transforms; transfer functions; performance of dynamic systems; time and frequency analysis; observability and controllability; and close-loop controller design.



BME346H1 SBiomedical Engineering and Omics Technologies

III-AEESCBASET, I-AEMINNANO
2/4/-/0.50

An introduction to the principles and design of fundamental technologies used in biomedical engineering and “omics” research. Topics may include but are not limited to tissue culture; spectroscopy; electrophoresis; PCR, genomics, sequencing technologies, and gene expression measurement; protein expression assays and tagging strategies; fluorescence labeling tools, microscopy, and high content imaging; DNA manipulation and transfection, RNAi, and other genetic and molecular tools for transformation of organisms. Laboratories will provide hands-on experience with selected technologies. Students will engage in a major design project in which they will design an experimental plan to investigate a specific research question, also of their design, utilizing available laboratory technologies. Exclusion: BME340, BME440        

 



BME350H1 FBiomedical Systems Engineering I: Organ Systems

III-AEESCBASET, III-AEESCBASEZ,
I-AEMINBIO, I-AEMINRAM
3/1/2/0.50

An introduction to human anatomy and physiology with selected focus on the nervous, cardiovascular, respiratory, renal, and endocrine systems. The structures and mechanisms responsible for proper function of these complex systems will be examined in the healthy and diseased human body. The integration of different organ systems will be stressed, with a specific focus on the structure-function relationship. Application of biomedical engineering technologies in maintaining homeostasis will also be discussed.



BME358H1 SMolecular Biophysics

III-AEESCBASET
3/-/1/0.50

Topics to be covered will include: review of basic protein structure; molecular forces; thermodynamics of living systems: protein folding, physics of many-particle systems; open systems and chemical thermodynamics: Gibbs free energy and chemical potential; bioenergetics and molecular motors; electrical properties of living cells: Poisson-Boltzmann, membrane potential, cardiac cell and other excitable cells; chemical kinetics and reactions; mechanical properties of biomolecules; molecular manipulation techniques.



BME395H1 FBiomedical Systems Engineering II: Cells and Tissues

III-AEESCBASET, I-AEMINBIO
2/1/2/0.50

This course focuses on the molecular biology of cells, building on BME205, and their integration into tissues and organs. It covers integrating cells into tissues; molecular genetic techniques; signalling at the cell surface and signalling pathways that control gene activity; integration of signals and gene controls, the eukaryotic cell cycle, cell birth, lineage and death; inflammation, wound healing and immunology. The course will be centered around the problems of tissue engineering and of other medical devices or therapeutic options. There will be considerable emphasis on learning to read the research literature.



BME396H1 SBiomedical Systems Engineering III: Molecules and Cells

III-AEESCBASET
3/3/1/0.50

A quantitative approach to understanding cell and molecular biology. Using engineering tools (especially derived from transport phenomena and chemical kinetics) to model molecular dynamics in living cells and make predictions about cellular behaviour. Specific topics include: receptor-ligand interactions, morphogens, trafficking, signal transduction, cell adhesion and migration, and mechanotransduction. Examples from in vitro tissue culture systems and model organisms in vivo are used.


Prerequisite: BME395H1

BME428H1 FBiomedical Systems Engineering IV: Computational Systems Biology

IV-AEESCBASET
3/-/2/0.50

Through systematic mathematical analysis of biological networks, this course derives design principles that are cornerstones for the understanding of complex natural biological systems and the engineering of synthetic biological systems.  Course material includes: transcriptional networks, autoregulation, feed-forward loops, global network structure, protein networks, robustness, kinetic proofreading and optimality.  After completion of the course, students should be able to use quantitative reasoning to analyze biological systems and construct mathematical models to describe biological systems.

 


Prerequisite: BME350H1, BME395H1, BME396H1

BME430H1 SHuman Whole Body Biomechanics

IV-AEESCBASET, III-AEESCBASEZ,
I-AEMINBIO, III-AEMINBME
3/2/-/0.50

An introduction to the principles of human body movement. Specific topics include the dynamics of human motion and the neural motor system, with a focus on the positive/negative adaptability of the motor system. Students will experience basic techniques of capturing and analyzing human motion. Engineering applications and the field of rehabilitation engineering will be emphasized using other experimental materials. This course is designed for senior undergraduate and graduate students.


Prerequisite: CHE353H1 or BME205H1 or MIE100H1

BME440H1 FBiomedical Engineering Technology and Investigation

IV-AECHEBASC, III,IV-AECPEBASC,
III,IV-AEELEBASC, I-AEMINBIO,
III-AEMINBME, I-AEMINNANO
2/4/-/0.50

An introduction to the principles of fundamental technologies used in biomedical engineering research including but not limited to tissue culture, protein assays or colourimetric enzymatic-based assays, spectroscopy, fluorescence microscopy, PCR, electrophoresis, DNA manipulation and transfection. Since these technologies enable the investigation of a wide range of research questions with importantclinical implications, the main focus of the course is learning these technologies while subsequent application within the lab will allow evidence-based investigation into specific research questions.Scientific literature (both good and bad) pertaining to each technology will be reviewed as examples of conducting investigations.


Prerequisite: CHE353H1

BME455H1 FCellular and Molecular Bioengineering II

IV-AECHEBASC, III,IV-AECPEBASC,
III,IV-AEELEBASC, I-AEMINBIO
3/1.50/1/0.50

Quantitative approach to understanding cellular behaviour. Using engineering tools (especially derived from transport phenomena and chemical kinetics) to integrate and enhance what is known about mammalian cell behaviour at the molecular level. The course combines mathematical modeling with biology and includes numerical methods, factorial design, statistics, empirical models, mechanistic models and mass transfer. Specific topics include: receptor-ligand interactions, cell adhesion and migration, signal transduction, cell growth and differentiation. Examples from gene therapy, and cellular and tissue engineering are used.


Prerequisite: CHE353H1 and CHE354H1

BME460H1 FBiomaterial and Medical Device Product Development

IV-AEESCBASET
2/-/2/0.50

The objective of this course is to provide students with strategies by which they can “reverse engineer” medical device products intended for use as implantable devices or in contact with body tissue and fluids.  A top down approach will be taken where the regulatory path for product approval and associated costs with product development and validation are reviewed for different biomaterials and devices.  This path is then assessed in the context of product specific reimbursement, safety, competitive positioning and regulatory concerns.  Students will be required to use their existing knowledge of biomaterials and biocompatibility to frame the questions, challenges and opportunities with a mind to re-engineering products in order to capitalize on niche regulatory pathways.  The resulting regulatory path gives a good idea of the kind of trial design the product must prevail in and ultimately the design characteristics of the device itself.  The United States and Europe will be contrasted with respect to both their regulatory environment and reimbursement.  Lastly, quantitative product development risks estimates are considered in choosing a product path strategy for proof of concept and approval.


Prerequisite: MSE352H1

BME489H1 FBiomedical Systems Engineering Design

IV-AEESCBASET
1/-/4/0.50

A capstone design project that provides students in the Biomedical Systems Engineering option with an opportunity to intergrate and apply their technical knowledge and communication skills to solve real-world biomedical engineering design challenges. Students will work in small groups on projects that evolve from clinical partners, biomedical/clinical research and teaching labs, and commercial partners. At the end of the course, students submit a final design report and a poster for public exhibition.



BME498Y1 YBiomedical Engineering Capstone Design

IV-AEESCBASER, III-AEMINBME
2/3/-/1.00

In this project-based design course teams of students from diverse engineering disciplines (enrolled in the biomedical engineering minor) will engage in the bio-medical technology design process to identify, invent and implement a solution to a unmet clinical need. The students will learn about medical technology development and will engage in the process through lectures, guest lectures delivered by medical technology experts, "hands-on" practicums and a student driven design project. Approval to register in the course must be obtained from the Associate Chair, IBBME - Undergraduate.



BME499Y1 YApplied Research in Biomedical Engineering

III-AEMINBME
-/7/-/1.00

This course provides the opportunity to gain hands-on exposure and experience in dynamic biomedical research laboratories. Students will be required to perform two modules, one is completed in the Fall semester, and the second is completed in the Winter semester; each module will provide at minimum 90 hours of hands-on activity. Students will select opportunities with faculty in laboratories classified within two (of four) different themes at the Institute of Biomaterials and Biomedical Engineering (IBBME). Activities will provide exposure to experimental design, the use of analytical equipment, and assessment of relevant literature (scientific, patent, and regulatory) related to the research topic identified by the faculty member. 

You may only register in this course after obtaining approval from the Associate Director – Undergraduate IBBME.   


Prerequisite: CHE353H1 or equivalent
Corequisite: MIE331H1

BME595H1 SMedical Imaging

III,IV-AECPEBASC, III,IV-AEELEBASC,
IV-AEESCBASER, IV-AEESCBASET,
IV-AEMECBASC, I-AEMINBIO
2/3m/1m/0.50

This is a first course in medical imaging. It is designed as a final year course for engineers. It has a physical and mathematical approach emphasizing engineering concepts and design. It describes magnetic resonance and ultrasound and X ray imaging in detail. These topics allow engineers to apply principles learned in the first two years in: computer fundamentals, dynamics, calculus, basic EM theory, algebra and differential equations, signals systems. It is a depth course complementing the kernels: communication systems (modulation), fields and waves (wave propagation) and on probability and random processes (Poisson and Gaussian noise). It will introduce students to the concept of measurement as an “inverse problem”. The laboratory will involve hands on NMR and Ultrasound measurements as well as image analysis of MRI data.



BME330H1 SPatents in Biology and Medical Devices

IV-AEESCBASET, I-AEMINBIO
3/-/-/0.50

The emphasis of the course is on applying the logic of patents to diverse cases of products through biology and biomedical engineering.  A commercial context will be ever present the case studies.  Students will work in teams on these problems in class.  Students will learn to apply tests for obviousness, inventiveness, novelty and enablement based on the use of these tests in technology patents in the past.  Claim construction will be introduced towards the end of the course to learn how technologies can be protected in considering a patent.  There will be papers for reading in this course but no textbook.  This course is designed for senior undergraduate students (3-4 year).


Prerequisite: CHE313H1 or BME205H1

BME410H1 SRegenerative Engineering

IV-AEESCBASET
3/-/1/0.50

The course encompasses the new multidisciplinary area of Regenerative Engineering by integrating various components of Regenerative Medicine, Clinical Engineering, Human Biology & Physiology, Advanced Biomaterials, Tissue Engineering, and Stem Cell and Developmental Biology, bringing all these disciplines into the clinical perspective of translational medicine. The course starts with the key concepts of stem cell biology and their properties at the cellular and subcellular levels working our way to complex tissues and organs. In the first half of the course, 2D and 3D tissue and organ formation will be our main focus. In the second half, we will discuss the integration of medical devices, technologies and treatments into healthcare as well as clinical trial logistics, ethics and processes. The course materials will integrate cutting-edge research in regenerative medicine and current clinical trials by inviting scientists and clinicians as guest lecturers. Students will be given the rare opportunity to incorporate into their written assignments experiment-based learning via participation in workshops, tours of research facilities, seminars and independent projects integrated into the course during the semester.



BME435H1 SBiostatistics

I-AEMINBIO
3/-/1/0.50

This course is intended to provide students interested in biomedical research with an introduction to core statistical concepts and methods, including experimental design. The topics covered will follow the series “Points of Significance” which are articles on statistical methods and case studies published in the highly reputed scientific journal Nature Methods since 2013.  These include: i) Importance of being uncertain; ii) Error bars; iii) Significance, p-values and t-tests; iv) Power and sample size; v) Visualizing samples with box plots; vi) Comparing samples; vii) Non parametric tests; viii) Designing comparative experiments; ix) Analysis of variance and blocking; x) Replication; xi) Two-factor designs; xii) Sources of variation; xiii) Split plot designs; xiv) Sampling distribution and the bootstrap; xv) Association, correlation and causation; xvi) Simple linear regression. 


Prerequisite: BME225H1, CHE223H1, MIE231H1, or MSE238H1, (or equivalent)

Cells and Systems Biology


CSB435H1 SRegulatory Networks and Systems in Molecular Biology

IV-AEESCBASET
2/-/-/0.50

This course will expose students to several of the best-understood regulatory networks in molecular biology, as well as recent technological and methodological developments. Emphasis is on the mechanistic basis for these systems, methods and models for quantitative analysis of regulatory networks and the biological logic they encode.


Prerequisite: BCH311H1/CSB349H1/MGY311Y1

CSB450H1 FProteomics in Systems Biology

IV-AEESCBASET
2/-/-/0.50

A discussion on current proteomic approaches to understand biological processes.  The role of  mass spectrometry,  gel electrophoresis, protein-protein interaction and structural biology in understanding how proteins function in pathways and interaction networks will be discussed.


Prerequisite: BIO230H1/(BIO240H1, BIO241H1)/BIO255H1, BCH210H1

Chemical Engineering and Applied Chemistry


CHE112H1 F/SPhysical Chemistry

I-AECHEBASC, I-AECIVBASC,
I-AELMEBASC, I-AEMMSBASC
3/1/1/0.50

A course in physical chemistry. Topics discussed include systems and their states, stoichiometry, the properties of gases, the laws of chemical thermodynamics (calculations involving internal energy, enthalpy, free energy, and entropy), phase equilibrium, chemical equilibrium, ionic equilibrium, acids and bases, solutions, colligative properties, electrochemistry, and corrosion.



CHE113H1 SConcepts in Chemical Engineering

I-AECHEBASC
3/1/3/0.50

This course provides first year students with an overview of the chemical industry, the chemical engineering profession, and introduces key concepts for the upcoming years of study.  The chemical industry is the interface between natural resources (minerals, oil, gas, agricultural products, etc.) and the consumers of the higher value products derived therefrom.  This diverse industry has both high volume-low unit value and low volume-high unit value products, and the manufacture of each type of product has its own challenges.  The chemical engineering profession applies the scientific fundamentals through two key concepts: Unit Operations as well as Flux.  The fundamental elements of stoichiometry and reaction kinetics are further extended to cover the concepts of yield, conversion and their specific applications to continuous and batch reactor systems.  Analysis of electrical circuits is introduced, leading to nodal analysis of circuits. The application of resistance in series and capacitance is extended into chemical engineering problems involved, heat transfer, mass transfer and momentum transfer, as well as reaction engineering.  The laboratory will reinforce these key chemical engineering principles.



CHE204H1 FChemical Engineering and Applied Chemistry- Laboratory I

II-AECHEBASC
-/3/-/0.25

This laboratory course will survey aspects of inorganic, organic and analytical chemistry from a practical point of view in a comprehensive laboratory experience. Theory, where applicable, will be interwoven within the laboratories or given as self-taught modules. Topics to be covered are inorganic and organic synthesis and analysis and will include elements of process and industrial chemistry and practice (including Green Chemistry).



CHE208H1 FProcess Engineering

II-AECHEBASC
3/-/2/0.50

An introduction to mass and energy (heat) balances in open systems. A quantitative treatment of selected processes of fundamental industrial and environmental significance involving phase equilibria, reaction and transport phenomena under both steady state and unsteady state conditions. Examples will be drawn from the chemical and materials processing industries, the energy and resource industries and environmental remediation and waste management.


Prerequisite: MAT188H1

CHE210H1 SHeat and Mass Transfer

II-AECHEBASC
3/-/2/0.50

Fundamentals of heat and transfer, including conduction, convective heat transfer, natural convection, design of heat exchangers, Fick’s law of diffusion, analysis of mass transfer problems using Fick’s law and mass balances, and effect of chemical reactions on mass transfer. Particular attention is focused on convective heat and mass transfer coefficients as obtained in laminar flow, or from turbulent heat transfer correlations and analogies.


Prerequisite: CHE221H1

CHE211H1 FFluid Mechanics

II-AECHEBASC
3/-/2/0.50

Fundamentals of fluid mechanics including hydrostatics, manometry, Bernoulli’s equation, integral mass, linear momentum and energy balances, engineering energy equation, Moody chart, pipe flow calculations, flow measurement instruments and pumps, dimensional analysis, differential analysis of laminar viscous flow, and brief introductions to particle systems, turbulent 1low, non-Newtonian fluids and flow in porous systems.



CHE213H1 SApplied Chemistry II - Organic Chemistry

II-AECHEBASC
3/-/1/0.50

Topics include the structure, bonding and characteristic reactions of organic compounds including additions, eliminations, oxidations, reductions, radical reactions, condensation/hydrolysis and rearrangements. The chemical relationships and reactivities of simple functional groups are discussed with an emphasis placed on reaction mechanisms involving the formation of organic intermediates, chemicals and polymers. An introduction will be given on biologically relevant compounds such as carbohydrates, proteins, lipids and nucleic acids. Examples will be discussed which outline the usefulness of these reactions and chemicals within the broader chemical industry.


Corequisite: CHE204H1

CHE220H1 FApplied Chemistry I - Inorganic Chemistry

II-AECHEBASC
3/-/1/0.50

The Chemistry and physical properties of inorganic compounds are discussed in terms of atomic structure and molecular orbital treatment of bonding. Topics include acid-base and donor-acceptor chemistry, crystalline solid state, chemistry of main group elements and an introduction to coordination chemistry.  Emphasis is placed on second row and transition metal elements.



CHE221H1 FCalculus and Numerical Methods

II-AECHEBASC
3/-/2/0.50

Introduction to partial differentiation, multiple integrals, vector analysis, and numerical techniques with applications to process calculations, fluid mechanics and other transport phenomena. Topics covered include partial derivatives, chain rule, exact differentials, vector operators, Green’s Theorem, divergence theorem and Stokes’ Theorem. Computer laboratory work involves the application of numerical techniques and computer calculations to chemical engineering problems.



CHE222H1 SApplied Differential Equations

II-AECHEBASC
3/2/1/0.50

Solution of differential equations using the D-operator, Laplace transform methods and vector-matrix techniques. Application of these techniques to problems of chemical engineering interest. Considerable emphasis will be placed on the formulation of the relevant differential equations and the identification of the appropriate boundary conditions.


Prerequisite: MAT186H1, MAT187H1

CHE230H1 SEnvironmental Chemistry

II-AECHEBASC, I-AEMINENV
3/-/2/0.50
The chemical phenomena occurring in environmental systems are examined based on fundamental principles of organic, inorganic and physical chemistry. The course is divided into sections describing the chemistry of the atmosphere, natural waters and soils. The principles applied in the course include reaction kinetics and mechanisms, complex formation, pH and solubility equilibria and adsorption phenomena. Molecules of biochemical importance and instrumental methods of analysis relevant to environmental systems are also addressed. (formerly EDC230H1S)

CHE249H1 FEngineering Economic Analysis

I-AECERBUS, I-AECERENTR,
II-AECHEBASC, I-AEMINBUS
3/-/1/0.50
Engineering analysis and design are not ends in themselves, but they are a means for satisfying human wants. Thus, engineering concerns itself with the materials used and forces and laws of nature, and the needs of people. Because of scarcity of resources and constraints at all levels, engineering must be closely associated with economics. It is essential that engineering proposals be evaluated in terms of worth and cost before they are undertaken. In this course we emphasize that an essential prerequisite of a successful engineering application is economic feasibility. Hence, investment proposals are evaluated in terms of economic cost concepts, including break even analysis, cost estimation and time value of money. Effective interest rates, inflation and deflation, depreciation and income tax all affect the viability of an investment. Successful engineering projects are chosen from valid alternatives considering such issues as buy or lease, make or buy, cost and benefits and financing alternatives. Both public sector and for-profit examples are used to illustrate the applicability of these rules and approaches.

CHE260H1 FThermodynamics and Heat Transfer

II-AEESCBASE, I-AEMINENR
3/0.50/1/0.50

Classical thermodynamics and its applications to engineering processes. Concepts of energy, heat, work and entropy. First and second laws of thermodynamics. Properties of pure substances and mixtures. Phase equilibrium. Ideal heat engines and refrigerators. Mechanisms of heat transfer: conduction, convection and radiation. Steady state heat transfer. Solution of conduction equation. Convective heat transfer coefficients. Momentum and heat transfer analogies. Basics of radiative heat transfer..


Exclusion: CHE210H1, CHE323H1, CHE326H1, CHE119H1, MSE202H1 or MIE210H1
Recommended Preparation: MAT195H1

CHE299H1 YCommunication

II-AECHEBASC
-/-/2/0.25

Each student will learn to identify the central message they wish to communicate.  They will learn to articulate this message through effective argumentation.  Students will analyze their audience and purpose to select the most effective mode of communication.  Students will summarize and synthesize information from external sources and effectively organize information and prioritize it in each mode of communication.  They will apply effective strategies to the design of text, visuals and oral presentations.



CHE308H1 FEnergy Systems and Fuels: Global Needs, Challenges, and Technological Opportunities

III-AEESCBASEJ
3/-/1/0.50

The chemistry and chemical engineering involved in various forms of power generation and storage: alternative liquid fuels, nuclear power, fuel cells, solar cells/photovoltaics. A team-taught course with instruction from leading experts within the Faculty. Lectures will be focused around the presentation and analysis of recent published accounts or a review of the state of the art, while providing the necessary background within each field to enable the students to make objective critiques of the topics discussed. Where applicable, the design of facilities and devices for the forms of generation or storage will be discussed.



CHE311H1 SSeparation Processes

III-AECHEBASC
3/-/2/0.50

Staged equilibrium and rate governed separation processes for gases and liquids. Topics include equilibrium stage calculations, cascade separation, binary distillation, gas absorption and stripping, liquid-liquid extraction, membrane processes, adsorption and ion exchange. Experiments in fluid mechanics, heat transfer and related unit operations.



CHE322H1 SProcess Dynamics and Control

III-AECHEBASC
3/-/2/0.50

The major goals of this course are to teach students how to model chemical processes and how to design control strategies for these processes. The first part of the course focuses on the types of interconnections encountered in chemical engineering, namely feedback, parallel and series connections, and their effect on the process dynamics. The second part of the course looks at the design of feedback, feedforward, cascade and multivariable control strategies for these processes and interprets these types of “engineered” interconnections in terms of the effect they have on the performance of the overall system. This course will make extensive use of interactive learning through computer simulation based on the Matlab software package and its associated Simulink block diagram simulation environment.



CHE323H1 FEngineering Thermodynamics

III-AECHEBASC, I-AEMINENR
3/-/2/0.50

Classical thermodynamics and its applications to engineering processes are introduced. Topics include: the concepts of energy, work and entropy; the first and second laws of thermodynamics; properties of pure substances and mixtures; the concepts of thermal equilibrium, phase equilibrium and chemical equilibrium; and heat engines and refrigeration cycles.



CHE324H1 FProcess Design

III-AECHEBASC, III-AEMMSBASC
3/-/1/0.50

This course presents the philosophy and typical procedures of chemical engineering design projects. The course begins at the design concept phase. Material and energy balances are reviewed along with the design of single unit operations and equipment specification sheets. The impact of recycles on equipment sizing is covered. Safety, health and environmental regulations are presented. These lead to the development of safe operating procedures. The systems for developing Piping and Instrumentation diagrams are presented. Process safety studies such as HAZOPS are introduced. Typical utility systems such as steam, air and vacuum are discussed. Project economics calculations are reviewed.



CHE332H1 FReaction Kinetics

III-AECHEBASC, III-AEMMSBASC
3/-/2/0.50
The rates of chemical processes. Topics include: measurement of reaction rates, reaction orders and activation energies; theories of reaction rates; reaction mechanisms and networks; development of the rate law for simple and complex kinetic schemes; approach to equilibrium; homogeneous and heterogeneous catalysis. Performance of simple chemical reactor types.

CHE333H1 SChemical Reaction Engineering

III-AECHEBASC, IV-AEESCBASEJ,
III-AEMMSBASC
3/-/2/0.50
Covers the basics of simple reactor design and performance, with emphasis on unifying the concepts in kinetics, thermodynamics and transport phenomena. Topics include flow and residence time distributions in various reactor types as well as the influence of transport properties (bulk and interphase) on kinetics and reactor performance. The interplay of these facets of reaction engineering is illustrated by use of appropriate computer simulations.

CHE334H1 STeam Strategies for Engineering Design

III-AECHEBASC
1/-/2/0.25
In this course, team strategies including how teams work, how to lead and manage teams, and decision making methodologies for successful teams will be taught in the context of engineering design. The development of problem solving and design steps will be undertaken. This course will be taught with an emphasis on team development and problem solving as it relates to the practice of process safety management in engineering and engineering design. The teams will develop a PFD and P&ID’s, as well as an operating procedure for a portion of the process. Thus, environmental and occupational health and safety becomes the vehicle through which the teamwork is performed.

CHE341H1 FEngineering Materials

I-AECERFORE, IV-AECHEBASC
3/-/1/0.50
This course advances the understanding of the use of materials in engineering design, with special emphasis on corrosion and the effect of chemical environment on long term failure modes. Students will learn how to apply material property data to specify materials for load bearing applications, thermal and other non-structural applications, and chemical containment and transport. Topics will include strength of materials concepts, an introduction to computerized materials databases, material failure modes and criteria, principles of corrosion, and practical applications of corrosion prediction and mitigation. Students are required to design a component of their choice and do a detailed materials selection as a major design project.

CHE353H1 FEngineering Biology

IV-AECHEBASC, IV-AECIVBASC,
III,IV-AECPEBASC, III,IV-AEELEBASC,
III-AEINDBASC, III-AEMECBASC,
I-AEMINBIO, III-AEMINBME,
III-AEMMSBASC
2/-/2/0.50

Using a quantitative, problem solving approach, this course will introduce basic concepts in cell biology and physiology.  Various engineering modelling tools will be used to investigate aspects of cell growth and metabolism, transport across cell membranes, protein structure, homeostasis, nerve conduction and mechanical forces in biology.  


Exclusion: BME105H1

CHE354H1 SCellular and Molecular Biology

IV-AECHEBASC, IV-AECIVBASC,
III,IV-AECPEBASC, III,IV-AEELEBASC,
III-AEMECBASC, I-AEMINBIO,
III-AEMMSBASC
3/1/2/0.50

This course will cover the principles of molecular and cellular biology as they apply to both  prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells.  Topics will include: metabolic conversion of carbohydrates, proteins, and lipids; nucleic acids; enzymology; structure and function relationships within cells;  and motility and growth.  Genetic analysis, immunohistochemistry, hybridomis, cloning, recombinant DNA and biotechnology will also be covered.  This course will appeal to students interested in environmental microbiology, biomaterials and tissue engineering, and bioprocesses. 


Prerequisite: CHE353H1

CHE374H1 FEconomic Analysis and Decision Making

I-AECERBUS, I-AECERENTR,
III-AEESCBASEA, III-AEESCBASEF,
III-AEESCBASEI, III-AEESCBASEJ,
III-AEESCBASEP, III-AEESCBASER,
III-AEESCBASET, III-AEESCBASEZ,
I-AEMINBUS
3/-/1/0.50

Economic evaluation and justification of engineering projects and investment proposals. Cost estimation; financial and cost accounting; depreciation; inflation; equity, bond and loan financing; after tax cash flow; measures of economic merit in the private and public sectors; sensitivity and risk analysis; single and multi-attribute decisions. Introduction to micro-economic. Applications: retirement and replacement analysis; make-buy and buy-lease decisions; economic life of assets; capital budgeting; selection from alternative engineering proposals; production planning; investment selection.


Exclusion: CHE249H1, CME368H1 or MIE258H1

CHE375H1 SEngineering Finance and Economics

III-AEESCBASEF
3/-/1/0.50

This course consists of three modules: 1) managerial accounting, 2) corporate finance and 3) macro economics. The first module, managerial accounting, will consist of an introduction to financial statements and double entry recordkeeping, then delve deeper into aspects of revenue, expenses, assets, debt and equity.The second module, corporate finance, will introduce the concept of risk and return, and the Capital Asset Pricing Model, and then delve deeper into capital budgeting, corporate financing, financial statement analysis and financial valuation. The third model, macro economics, will introduce global aspects of business, including economic, political, societal and technological, then discuss factors such as GDP, inflation, unemployment, interest rates, foreign exchange rates, fiscal debt/surplus and balance of payments, and their impact on the financials of a given country.



CHE391H1 FOrganic Chemistry and Biochemistry

III-AEESCBASET
3/1.50/1/0.50

This course examines the sources, structures, properties and reactions of organic chemicals with reference to their interactions with the environment. Industrial organic chemistry, biochemical compounds and relevant biochemical reactions will be discussed.



CHE403H1 SProfessional Practice

IV-AECHEBASC
2/-/-/0.00

In this course, lectures and seminars will be given by practicing engineers who will cover the legal and ethical responsibility an engineer owes to an employer, a client and the public with particular emphasis on environmental issues.



CHE412H1 SAdvanced Reactor Design

IV-AECHEBASC, IV-AEESCBASEJ
3/-/1/0.50
Heterogeneous reactors. Mass and heat transport effects including intraparticle transport effects (Thiele modulus). Stability for various rate laws, transport regimes. Time dependent issues - deactivation/regeneration strategies. Emerging processes.

CHE430Y1 FChemical Plant Design

IV-AECHEBASC
2/-/6/1.00

Students work in teams to design plants for the chemical and process industries and examine their economic viability. Lectures concern the details of process equipment and design.


Prerequisite: CHE249H1, CHE324H1, and two of CHE311H1, CHE322H1, CHE333H1 or equivalent)
Exclusion: APS490Y1

CHE450H1 FBioprocess Technology and Design

IV-AECHEBASC, I-AEMINBIO
3/0.66/1/0.50

Building upon CHE353 and CHE354, the aim of this course is to learn and apply engineering principles relevant to bioprocess engineering, including energetics and stoichiometry of cell growth, cell and enzyme kinetics, metabolic modeling, bioreactor design, and bioseparation processes.  In addition to course lectures, students will complete two laboratory exercises that will provide hands-on learning in bioreactor set-up and use.


Prerequisite: CHE353H1 and CHE354H1

CHE451H1 FPetroleum Processing

IV-AECHEBASC, IV-AEESCBASEJ,
I-AEMINENR
3/-/-/0.50

This course is aimed at surveying the oil industry practices from the perspective of a block flow diagram. Oil refineries today involve the large scale processing of fluids through primary separation techniques, secondary treating plus the introduction of catalyst for molecular reforming in order to meet the product demands of industry and the public. Crude oil is being shipped in increasing quantities from many parts of the world and refiners must be aware of the properties and specifications of both the crude and product slates to ensure that the crude is a viable source and that the product slate meets quality and quantity demands thus assuring a profitable operation. The course content will examine refinery oil and gas operations from feed, through to products, touching on processing steps necessary to meet consumer demands. In both course readings and written assignments, students will be asked to consider refinery operations from a broad perspective and not through detailed analysis and problem solving.



CHE460H1 SEnvironmental Pathways and Impact Assessment

IV-AECHEBASC, I-AEMINENR,
I-AEMINENV
3/-/2/0.50
Review of the nature, properties and elementary toxicology of metallic and organic contaminants. Partitioning between environmental media (air, aerosols, water, particulate matter, soils, sediments and biota) including bioaccumulation. Degradation processes, multimedia transport and mass balance models. Regulatory approaches for assessing possible effects on human health and ecosystems.

CHE462H1 SFood Engineering

IV-AECHEBASC, I-AEMINBIO
3/-/1/0.50

The quantitative application of chemical engineering principles to the large-scale production of food. Food processing at the molecular and unit operation levels. The chemistry and kinetics of specific food processes. The application of chemical engineering unit operations (distillation, extraction, drying) and food specific unit operations such as extrusion, thermal processing refrigeration/freezing.



CHE467H1 FEnvironmental Engineering

I-AECERFORE, IV-AECHEBASC,
I-AEMINENR, I-AEMINENV
3/-/1/0.50

Core Course in the Environmental Engineering Minor A course which treats environmental engineering from a broad based but quantitative perspective and covers the driving forces for engineering activities as well as engineering principles. Models which are used for environmental impact, risk analysis, health impact, pollutant dispersion, and energy system analysis are covered.



CHE469H1 SFuel Cells and Electrochemical Conversion Devices

IV-AECHEBASC, IV-AEESCBASEJ,
I-AEMINENR
3/-/1/0.50

The objective of this course is to provide a foundation for understanding the field of electrochemical conversion devices with particular emphasis on fuel cells. The topics will proceed from the fundamental thermodynamic in-system electodics and ionic interaction limitations to mass transfer and heat balance effects,t o the externalities such as economics and system integration challenges. Guest lecturers from the fuel cell industry will be invited to procide an industrial perspective. Participants will complete a paper and in-class presentation.


Exclusion: MIE517H1

CHE470H1 F/SSpecial Topics in Chemical Engineering

IV-AECHEBASC
3/-/1/0.50
A course covering selected topics in Chemical Engineering, not covered in other electives. Different topics may be covered each year depending on the interest of the Staff and students. May not be offered every year. Limited enrolment: permission of the Department required.

CHE471H1 SModelling in Biological and Chemical Systems

IV-AECHEBASC, IV-AEESCBASEF,
IV-AEESCBASET, I-AEMINBIO,
I-AEMINENV
3/-/1/0.50

This course outlines the methodology for the modelling of biological systems and its applications. Topics will include a review of physical laws, selection of balance space, compartmental versus distributed models, and applications of the conservation laws for both discrete and continuous systems at the level of algebraic and ordinary differential equations. The course covers a wide range of applications including environmental issues, chemical and biochemical processes and biomedical systems.



CHE475H1 SBiocomposites: Mechanics and Bioinspiration

I-AECERRRE, IV-AECHEBASC,
IV-AEESCBASET, IV-AEMECBASC,
I-AEMINBIO, I-AEMINENV,
I-AEMINNANO
3/-/1/0.50

An overview on structure, processing and application of natural and biological materials, biomaterials for biomedical applications, and fibre-reinforced eco-composites based on renewable resources will be provided. Fundamental principles related to linear elasticity, linear viscoelasticity, dynamic mechanical response, composite reinforcement mechanics, and time-temperature correspondence will be introduced. Novel concepts in comparative biomechanics, biomimetic and bio-inspired material design, and materials’ ecological and environmental impact will be discussed. In addition, key material processing methods and testing and characterization techniques will be presented. Structure-property relationships for materials broadly ranging from natural materials, including wood, bone, cell, and soft tissue, to synthetic composite materials for industrial and biomedical applications will be covered.

Not Offered in 2015-16.



CHE488H1 SEntrepreneurship and Business for Engineers

I-AECERBUS, I-AEMINBUS
3/-/2/0.50

A complete introduction to small business formation, management and wealth creation. Topics include: the nature of the Entrepreneur and the Canadian business environment; business idea search and Business Plan construction; Buying a business, franchising, taking over a family business; Market research and sources of data; Marketing strategies promotion, pricing, advertising, electronic channels and costing; The sales process and management, distribution channels and global marketing; Accounting, financing and analysis, sources of funding, and financial controls; The people dimension: management styles, recruiting and hiring, legal issues in employment and Human Resources; Legal forms of organization and business formation, taxation, intellectual property protection; the e-Business world and how businesses participate; Managing the business: location and equipping the business, suppliers and purchasing, credit, ethical dealing; Exiting the business and succession, selling out. A full Business Plan will be developed by each student and the top submissions will be entered into a Business Plan competition with significant cash prices for the winners. Examples will be drawn from real business situations including practicing entrepreneurs making presentations and class visits during the term. (Identical courses are offered: ECE488H1F, MIE488H1F, MSE488H1F and CIV488H1S.)

*Complementary Studies Elective


Exclusion: APS234H1, APS432H1

CHE499Y1 YThesis

IV-AECHEBASC
-/7/-/1.00

The course consists of a research project conducted under the supervision of a senior staff member. The project may have an experimental, theoretical or design emphasis. Each thesis will contain a minimum 60% combined Engineering Science and Engineering Design (with a minimum of 10% in each component). This course is open to students with permission of the Department and research project supervisor.



CHE507H1 SData-based Modelling for Prediction and Control

IV-AECHEBASC, IV-AEESCBASEF,
IV-AEESCBASEP, III-AEESCBASEZ,
I-AEMINRAM
3/-/1/0.50

This course will teach students how to build mathematical models of dynamic systems and how to use these models for prediction and control purposes. The course will deal primarily with a system identification approach to modelling (using observations from the system to build a model). Both continuous time and discrete time representations will be treated along with deterministic and stochastic models. This course will make extensive use of interactive learning by having students use computer based tools available in the Matlab software package (e.g. the System Identification Toolbox and the Model Predictive Control Toolbox).



CHE561H1 SRisk Based Safety Management

I-AECERFORE, IV-AECHEBASC
3/-/1/0.50

This course provides an introduction to Process Safety Management. The historical drivers to improve safety performance are reviewed and the difference between safety management and occupational health and safety is discussed. National and international standards for PSM are reviewed. Risk analysis is introduced along with techniques for process hazard analysis and quantification. Consequence and frequency modelling is introduced. Rsik based decision making is introduced, and the course concludes with a discussio of the key management systems required for a successful PSM system.



CHE562H1 FApplied Chemistry IV – Applied Polymer Chemistry, Science and Engineering

IV-AECHEBASC, IV-AEESCBASET,
I-AEMINNANO, IV-AEMMSBASC
3/-/-/0.50

This course serves as an introduction to concepts in polymer chemistry, polymer science and polymer engineering. This includes a discussion of the mechanisms of step growth, chain growth and ring-opening polymerizations with a focus on industrially relevant polymers and processes. The description of polymers in solution as well as the solid state will be explored.  Several modern polymer characterization techniques are introduced including gel permeation chromatography, differential scanning calorimetry, thermal gravimetric analysis and others.


Exclusion: CHM426H1
Recommended Preparation: CHE213H1, CHE220H1 or equivalents.

CHE564H1 SPulp and Paper Processes

IV-AECHEBASC, I-AEMINBIO,
I-AEMINENV
3/-/1/0.50

The processes of pulping, bleaching and papermaking are used to illustrate and integrate chemical engineering principles. Chemical reactions, phase changes and heat, mass and momentum transfer are discussed. Processes are examined on four scales: molecular, diffusional, unit operations and mill. In the tutorial each student makes several brief presentations on selected topics and entertains discussion.

Not offered in 2015-2016.



CHE565H1 FAqueous Process Engineering

IV-AECHEBASC, IV-AEESCBASEJ,
IV-AELMEBASC, I-AEMINENV,
IV-AEMMSBASC
3/-/1/0.50
Application of aqueous chemical processing to mineral, environmental and industrial engineering. The course involves an introduction to the theory of electrolyte solutions, mineral-water interfaces, dissolution and crystallization processes, metal ion separations, and electrochemical processes in aqueous reactive systems. Applications and practice of (1) metal recovery from primary (i.e. ores) and secondary (i.e. recycled) sources by hydrometallurgical means, (2) treatment of aqueous waste streams for environmental protection, and (3) production of high-value-added inorganic materials.

CHE566H1 FElements of Nuclear Engineering

I-AECERNUC, IV-AECHEBASC,
IV-AEESCBASEJ, I-AEMINENR
3/-/1/0.50

A first course in nuclear engineering intended to introduce students to all aspects of this interdisciplinary field. Topics covered include nuclear technology, atomic and nuclear physics, thermonuclear fusion, nuclear fission, nuclear reactor theory, nuclear power plants, radiation protection and shielding, environment and nuclear safety, and the nuclear fuel cycle.



CHE568H1 SNuclear Engineering

I-AECERNUC, IV-AECHEBASC,
IV-AEESCBASEJ, IV-AEESCBASEP,
I-AEMINENR
3/-/1/0.50
Fundamental and applied aspects of nuclear engineering. The structure of the nucleus; nuclear stability and radioactive decay; the interaction of radiation with matter including radiological health hazards; the interaction of neutrons including cross-sections, flux, moderation, fission, neutron diffusion and criticality. Poison buildup and their effects on criticality. Nuclear engineering of reactors, reactor accidents, and safety issues.
Exclusion: MIE414H1

CHE205H1 SChemical Engineering and Applied Chemistry- Laboratory II
-/3/-/0.50

This laboratory course will survey aspects of inorganic, organic and analytical chemistry from a practical point of view in a comprehensive laboratory experience. Theory, where applicable, will be interwoven within the laboratories or given as self-taught modules. Topics to be covered are inorganic and organic synthesis and analysis and will include elements of process and industrial chemistry and practice (including Green Chemistry).



CHE304H1 FChemical Engineering and Applied Chemistry - Laboratory III

III-AECHEBASC
-/6/-/0.50

This laboratory course involves experiments investigating thermodynamics and kinetics, complimenting two courses this term.  Thermodynamic experiments include phase equilibrium and calorimetry, and kinetics experiment include ivestigations of rate constants and Arrhenius behvaiour. Experimental applications of physical and chemical principles using pilot scale equipment. Experiments illustrating major unit operations: distillation; absorption; reactors; extraction; humidification; heat exchange.



CHE305H1 SChemical Engineering and Applied Chemistry - Laboratory IV

III-AECHEBASC
-/6/-/0.50

This laboratory course involves experiments investigating thermodynamics and kinetics, complimenting two courses this term.  Thermodynamic experiments include phase equilibrium and calorimetry, and kinetics experiment include ivestigations of rate constants and Arrhenius behvaiour. Experimental applications of physical and chemical principles using pilot scale equipment. Experiments illustrating major unit operations: distillation; absorption; reactors; extraction; humidification; heat exchange.



CHE416H1 SChemical Engineering in Human Health

I-AEMINBIO
3/-/-/0.50

Life expectancy has consistently increased over the past 70 years due to advances in healthcare and sanitation.  Engineers have played key roles in developing technologies and processes that enabled these critical advances in healthcare to occur. This course will provide an overview of areas in which chemical engineers directly impacted human health. We will study established processes that had transformative effects in the past as well as new emerging areas that chemical engineers are developing today to impact human health. Emphasis will be placed on quantitative approaches. Engineering tools, especially derived from transport phenomena and chemical kinetics will be used. Required readings, including scientific papers, will be assigned. Industrial visit and/or a hands-on project will be included. 


Prerequisite: CHE353H1F,CHE354H1S/MIE331; BME205

Chemistry


CHM210H1 FChemistry of Environmental Change

I-AEMINENV
2m/-/1m/0.50

Examines the fundamental chemical processes of the Earth’s natural environment, and changes induced by human activity. Topics relate to the atmosphere: urban air pollution, stratospheric ozone depletion, acid rain; the hydrosphere: water resources and pollution, wastewater analysis; biogeochemistry and inorganic metals in the environment.


Prerequisite: CHM135H1/CHM139H1/CHM151Y1,(MAT135H1,MAT136H1)/MAT137Y1
Exclusion: ENV235Y1

CHM310H1 SEnvironmental Chemistry

I-AEMINENV
2m/-/-/0.50

This course considers carbon-containing molecules in the environment from a variety of perspectives: the carbon cycle, climate change and ocean acidification; fossil fuels and alternative energy sources; and the partitioning and degradation pathways of organic chemicals.


Prerequisite: (CHM135H1/CHM139H1, CHM136H1/CHM138H1)/CHM151Y1, (MAT135H1, MAT136H1)/MAT137Y1

CHM325H1 SIntroduction to Inorganic and Polymer Materials Chemistry

I-AEMINNANO, III-AEMMSBASC
2/-/-/0.50

Fashioned to illustrate how inorganic and polymer materials chemistry can be rationally used to synthesize superconductors, metals, semiconductors, ceramics, elastomers, thermoplastics, thermosets and polymer liquid crystals, with properties that can be tailored for applications in a range of advanced technologies. Coverage is fairly broad and is organized to crosscut many aspects of the field. 


Prerequisite: CHM220H1/CHM222H1/CHM2225Y, CHM238Y1, CHM247H1/CHM249H1

CHM328H1 SModern Physical Chemistry

I-AEMINNANO
-/-/-/0.50

This course explores the microscopic description of macroscopic phenomena in chemistry. Statistical mechanics is introduced as the bridge between the microscopic and macroscopic views, and applied to a variety of chemical problems including reaction dynamics. More advanced topics in thermodynamics are introduced and discussed as required.


Prerequisite: (CHM220H1/CHM222H1,CHM221H1/CHM223H1)/CHM225Y1, MAT235Y1/MAT237Y1
Exclusion: JCP322H5, CHMC20H3

CHM338H1 FIntermediate Inorganic Chemistry

I-AEMINNANO
-/-/-/0.50

Further study of the structures, physical properties and reactions of compounds and transition metals. Introductions to spectroscopy and structural analysis, reaction mechanisms, d- block organometallic compounds, catalysis, and bioinorganic chemistry. The weekly laboratory demonstrates aspects of transition metal chemistry. (Lab Materials Fee: $25).


Prerequisite: CHM238Y1 with a minimum grade of 63%
Exclusion: CHM331H5
Recommended Preparation: CHM217H1, CHM247H1/CHM249H1

CHM410H1 SAnalytical Environmental Chemistry

I-AEMINENV
2/4/-/0.50

An analytical theory, instrumental, and methodology course focused on the measurement of pollutants in soil, water, air, and biological tissues and the determination of physical/chemical properties including vapour pressure, degradation rates, partitioning. Lab experiments involve application of theory. (Lab Materials Fee: $25).


Prerequisite: CHM217H1, CHM210H1/CHM310H1
Recommended Preparation: CHM317H1

CHM415H1 STopics in Atmospheric Chemistry

IV-AECHEBASC, I-AEMINENV
2/-/-/0.50

This course builds upon the introductory understanding of atmospheric chemistry provided in CHM210H. In particular, modern research topics in the field are discussed, such as aerosol chemistry and formation mechanisms, tropospheric organic chemistry, the chemistry of climate including cloud formation and geoengineering, biosphere-atmosphere interactions, the chemistry of remote environments. Reading is from the scientific literature; class discussion is emphasized.


Prerequisite: (CHM220H1/CHM222H1/CHM225Y1),CHM210H1
Recommended Preparation: (PHY131H1, PHY132H1)/(PHY151H1, PHY152H1)

CHM434H1 FAdvanced Materials Chemistry
2/-/-/0.50

A comprehensive investigation of synthetic methods for preparing diverse classes of inorganic materials with properties intentionally tailored for a particular use. Begins with a primer on solid-state materials and electronic band description of solids followed by a survey of archetypical solids that have had a dramatic influence on the materials world, some new developments in materials chemistry and a look at perceived future developments in materials research and technology. Strategies for synthesizing many different classes of materials with intentionally designed structures and compositions, textures and morphologies are then explored in detail emphasizing how to control the relations between structure and property of materials and ultimately function and utility. A number of contemporary issues in materials research are critically evaluated to appreciate recent highlights in the field of materials chemistry - an emerging sub-discipline of chemistry.


Prerequisite: CHM325H1, CHM338H1

CHM446H1 SOrganic Materials Chemistry

I-AEMINBIO
2/-/-/0.50

This course covers design, synthesis, characterization and application of organic materials. Emphasis is placed on classic examples of organic materials including semiconducting polymers, molecular devices, self-assembled systems, and bioconjugates, as well as recent advances from the literature.


Prerequisite: CHM247H1/CHM249H1, CHM220H1/CHM222H1/CHM225Y1
Recommended Preparation: CHM325H1, CHM342H1/CHM343H1

Civil Engineering


CIV100H1 FMechanics

I-AECHEBASC, I-AECIVBASC,
I-AECPEBASC, I-AEELEBASC,
I-AEENGBASC, I-AEINDBASC,
I-AELMEBASC, I-AEMECBASC,
I-AEMMSBASC
3/-/2/0.50

The principles of statics are applied to composition and resolution of forces, moments and couples. The equilibrium states of structures are examined. Throughout, the free body diagram concept is emphasized. Vector algebra is used where it is most useful, and stress blocks are introduced. Shear force diagrams, bending moment diagrams and stress-strain relationships for materials are discussed. Stress and deformation in axially loaded members and flexural members (beams) are also covered.


Exclusion: APS160H1

CIV102H1 FStructures and Materials - An Introduction to Engineering Design

I-AEESCBASE
3/1/1/0.50

An introduction to the art and science of designing structures. Topics include: 1) material bodies that sustain or resist force, work, energy, stress and strain; 2) the properties of engineering materials (strength, stiffness, ductility); 3) simple structural elements; 4) engineering beam theory; 5) stability of columns; 6) the practical problems which constrain the design of structures such as bridges, towers, pressure vessels, dams, ships, aircraft, bicycles, birds and trees; and 7) design methods aimed at producing safe, functional, efficient and elegant structures.

 


Corequisite: PHY180H1
Exclusion: CIV100H1

CIV201H1 FIntroduction to Civil Engineering

II-AECIVBASC
-/-/-/0.20

A field-based course introducing students to current and historical civil engineering works in the urban and natural environments, highlighting the role of the Civil Engineer in developing sustainable solutions. It will run the Tuesday through Thursday immediately following Labour Day, with follow-up assignments coordinated with the course CIV282 Engineering Communications I. Students must have their own personal protective equipment (PPE). One night will be spent at the University of Toronto Survey Camp near Minden, Ontario.



CIV209H1 SCivil Engineering Materials

II-AECIVBASC
3/2/2/0.50

Deals with the basic principles necessary for the use and selection of materials used in Civil Engineering and points out the significance of these in practice. Fundamentals which provide a common basis for the properties of various materials are stressed. The laboratory time is devoted to demonstrations illustrating the fundamentals covered in lectures.


Prerequisite: APS104H1 or MSE101H1

CIV214H1 SStructural Analysis I

II-AECIVBASC
3/-/2/0.50

This course provides an introduction to the nature of loads and restraints and types of structural elements, and then reviews the analysis of statically determinate structures. Shear and moment diagrams for beams and frames are considered, along with influence lines, cantilever structures, three-pin arches, cables and fatigue. Virtual work principles are viewed and applied to various structural systems. An introduction to the analysis of indeterminate structures is made, and the Portal method is applied to the analysis of building frames under lateral loads.  Displacement methods of an analysis including moment distribution are also studied.


Prerequisite: MAT188H1, CIV210H1/CME210H1

CIV220H1 FUrban Engineering Ecology

II-AECIVBASC, III,IV-AECPEBASC,
III,IV-AEELEBASC, III-AEINDBASC,
III-AEMECBASC, I-AEMINENV
3/-/1/0.50

Core Course in the Environmental Engineering Minor Basic concepts of ecology within the context of urban environments. Response of organisms, populations, dynamic predator-prey and competition processes, and ecosystems to human activities. Thermodynamic basis for food chains, energy flow, biodiversity and ecosystem stability. Biogeochemical cycles, habitat fragmentation and bioaccumulation. Introduction to industrial ecology and life cycle assessment principles. Urban metabolism and material flow analysis of cities. Response of receiving waters to pollution and introduction to waste water treatment. Emphasis is on identifying the environment/engineering interface and minimizing environmental impacts.


Prerequisite: CHE112H1.
Exclusion: EDV220H1

CIV235H1 SCivil Engineering Graphics

II-AECIVBASC
-/6/-/0.50

Fluency in graphical communication skills as part of the civil engineering design process is emphasized. Drawings are prepared making use of freehand sketching, drafting equipment and commercially available computer drafting programs. Topics in descriptive geometry are covered to develop spatial visualization skills. Drawing procedures and standards relevant to Civil Engineering projects to be covered include layout and development of multiple orthographic views, sectional views, dimensioning, and pictorial views. Class projects, assignments, and examples demonstrate how graphical skills fit into the overall design process.



CIV250H1 SHydraulics and Hydrology

IV-AECHEBASC, II-AECIVBASC,
I-AEMINENV
3/1.50/1/0.50

The hydrologic processes of precipitation and snowmelt, evapotranspiration, ground water movement, and surface and subsurface runoff are examined. Water resources sustainability issues are discussed, including water usage and water shortages, climate change impacts, land use impacts, and source water protection. Conceptual models of the hydrologic cycle and basics of hydrologic modelling are developed, including precipitation estimation, infiltration and abstraction models, runoff hydrographs, the unit hydrograph method and the Rational method. Methods for statistical analysis of hydrologic data, concepts of risk and design, and hydrological consequences of climate change for design are introduced. Principles of open channel hydraulics are introduced. Energy and momentum principles are studied with application to channel transitions, critical flow, choked flow, and hydraulic jumps.


Prerequisite: CME270H1

CIV280H1 FManagement of Construction

II-AECIVBASC, IV-AEESCBASEI
3/-/2/0.50

An introduction to the management of construction projects including: the nature of the industry, project delivery alternatives, legal and ethical considerations, the Safety Act and construction regulations, labour relations, construction contracts, risk distribution, project planning and scheduling, estimating and bidding, controlling of time, cost and quality, accounting leading to financial statements, dispute resolution, as well as new and evolving concepts in managing construction.


Exclusion: CIV320H1.

CIV282H1 FEngineering Communications I

II-AECIVBASC
1/-/1/0.20

This course develops students’ communications skills focusing on the specific skills required for work in foundational civil engineering. Target communication areas include: Oral Presentation; Logical Argument; Document Development; Sentence and Discourse Control; and Visual Design. The course will build capacity in support of specific assignments delivered in other courses in the same term.



CIV300H1 F/STerrestrial Energy Systems

IV-AECHEBASC, IV-AECIVBASC,
III,IV-AECPEBASC, III,IV-AEELEBASC,
III-AEINDBASC, III-AEMECBASC,
I-AEMINENR, I-AEMINENV
3/-/2/0.50

Core Course in the Sustainable Energy Minor Various earth systems for energy transformation, storage and transport are explored. Geological, hydrological, biological, cosmological and oceanographic energy systems are considered in the context of the Earth as a dynamic system, including the variation of solar energy received by the planet and the redistribution of this energy through various radiative, latent and sensible heat transfer mechanisms. It considers the energy redistribution role of large scale atmospheric systems, of warm and cold ocean currents, the role of the polar regions, and the functioning of various hydrological systems. The contribution and influence of tectonic systems on the surface systems is briefly introduced, as well the important role of energy storage processes in physical and biological systems, including the accumulation of fossil fuel reserves.


Exclusion: ENV346H1

CIV312H1 FSteel and Timber Design

III-AECIVBASC
3/-/2/0.50

An introduction to structural engineering design. Topics discussed include safety and reliability, load and resistance, probability of failure, performance factors, and material properties. A study of basic steel design examines tension members, compression members, beams, framing concepts and connections. Plasticity and composite action in steel structural systems are also discussed. Timber design aspects include beams, compression members and connections.


Prerequisite: CIV214H1, CIV235H1

CIV313H1 SReinforced Concrete I

III-AECIVBASC
3/-/2/0.50

This course provides an introduction to the design of reinforced concrete structures. Concrete technology, properties of concrete and reinforcing steel, construction practice, and general code requirements are discussed. Analysis and design of members under axial load, flexure, shear, and restraint force are examined in detail. Other aspects of design covered include control of cracks, minimum and maximum reinforcement ratios, fire resistance, durability, distress and failure. A major design project, done in teams of two and accounting for 15% of the final mark, requires students to formulate a complete design for a structural system such as a pedestrian bridge or floor system. Project requirements include consideration of alternative designs in terms of structural efficiency and total costs.


Prerequisite: CIV312H1

CIV324H1 SGeotechnical Engineering II

III-AECIVBASC, IV-AELMEBASC
3/1/1/0.50

Building on CME321, more complex aspects of geotechnical analysis and design are considered. Topics include: mineralogy; soil identification and classification; laboratory- and field-based soil index tests; correlations of index test results to engineering properties; vertical stress distribution; soil-foundation interaction; volume change and consolidation of clay and settlement. Shear strength of soil and slope stability analysis are also discussed. Laboratories are held for soil identification and classification, and confined triaxial compression tests of clay and sand.


Prerequisite: CIV321H1 or CME321H1.
Exclusion: CIV424H1.

CIV331H1 FTransport I - Introduction to Urban Transportation Systems

III-AECIVBASC
3/-/1/0.50

This course introduces the fundamentals of transportation systems and the application of engineering, mathematical and economic concepts and principles to address a variety of transportation issues in Canada. Several major aspects of transportation engineering will be addressed, including transportation planning, public transit, traffic engineering, geometric design, pavement design and the economic, social and environmental impacts of transportation. The course focuses on urban transportation engineering problems.



CIV332H1 STransport II - Performance

III-AECIVBASC
3/-/1/0.50

This course focuses on the fundamental techniques of transportation systems performance analysis with emphasis on congested traffic networks. Topics include transportation demand, supply and equilibrium, traffic assignment, network equilibrium, and system optimality, traffic flow theory, shockwaves, highway capacity analysis, introduction to deterministic and stochastic queuing analyses, intersection signal control types and related timing methods, and traffic simulation. The course also provides an introduction to basic elements of Intelligent Transportation Systems (ITS).



CIV340H1 SMunicipal Engineering

III-AECIVBASC
3/-/2/0.50

Municipal service systems for water supply and wastewater disposal, land development, population forecasting, and demand analysis. Water supply: source development, transmission, storage, pumping, and distribution networks. Sewerage and drainage, sewer and culvert hydraulics, collection networks, and storm water management. Maintenance and rehabilitation of water and wastewater systems, and optimization of network design. Design projects.


Prerequisite: EDV250H1 or CIV250H1.

CIV342H1 FWater and Wastewater Treatment Processes

III-AECIVBASC, I-AEMINBIO
3/1/1/0.50

Principles involved in the design and operation of water and wastewater treatment facilities are covered, including physical, chemical and biological unit operations, advanced treatment and sludge processing.


Exclusion: CIV540H1

CIV352H1 FStructural Design 1

III-AEESCBASEI
3/-/2/0.50

The course covers the analysis of determinate and indeterminate structures, with application of the principles to the design of steel bridges. The nature of loads and structural safety is considered, with reference to the Canadian Highway Bridge Design Code. Shear and bending moment diagrams for beams and frames are reviewed, as is the deflection of beams (by various methods) and the deflection of trusses. Classical bridge types, such as arches, trusses and suspension bridges are analyzed. Analysis tools studied include: Influence Lines, virtual work, fatigue, displacement methods for the analysis of indeterminate structures (including moment distribution for continuous beams), plus solution by computer frame analysis programs. The behaviour and design of basic steel members covers: tension members, compression members, beams, beam-columns and simple connections. Plastic analysis is introduced and applied to continuous beams. The expertise gained in structural analysis and steel design is then applied in a steel bridge design project.


Prerequisite: CIV102H1 or equivalent.

CIV355H1 FUrban Operations Research

III-AEESCBASEI
3/-/2/0.50

This course focuses on quantitative methods and techniques for the analysis and modelling of urban transportation and service systems. Major topics include probabilistic modelling, queuing models of transport operations, network models, mathematical programming and simulation. The application of these methods to modeling various components of the urban transportation system (including road, transit and pedestrian facilities) and to the planning and design of logistically-oriented urban service systems (e.g., fire and police departments, emergency medical services, etc..) is emphasized.



CIV357H1 SStructural Design 2

III-AEESCBASEI
3/-/2/0.50

Building on the "Structural Design I" course, further analysis tools for indeterminate structural systems are studied with generalized flexibility and stiffness methods. Loadings due to force, support displacement, temperature change and member prestrain are covered. Timber design aspects include material properties, beams, compression members and simple connections.  The behaviour and design of basic reinforced concrete elements covers concrete properties and members under axial load, shear and bending. Other practical aspects of design incorporated are crack control, minimum and maximum reinforcement ratios, durability, formwork and shoring.  The aptitude for structural analysis and concrete design is then tested in a low-rise, reinforced concrete building design project.


Prerequisite: CIV352H1

CIV360H1 SRoad Transportation Performance

III-AEESCBASEI
3/-/1/0.50

A deep understanding of the behaviour and performance of road systems is fundamental to transportation engineering and planning.  This course provides an in-depth exploration of the performance characteristics of highway and street systems that provides the basis for the design of road networks and operating systems, including Intelligent Transportation Systems for real-time control of roadways.  Theoretical principles and practical applications concerning roadway performance are discussed, including facility capacity, speed-flow relationships, operational control, measurement of performance and safety.  Driver behaviour and route choice and the demand-supply relationship between driver behaviour and system performance are examined in detail.  Non-motorized (walking and cycling) system performance is also introduced.



CIV375H1 FBuilding Science

IV-AECHEBASC, III-AECIVBASC,
I-AEMINENR, I-AEMINENV
3/0.33/2/0.50

The fundamentals of the science of heat transfer, moisture diffusion, and air movement are presented. Using these fundamentals, the principles of more sustainable building enclosure design, including the design of walls and roofs are examined. Selected case studies together with laboratory investigations are used to illustrate how the required indoor temperature and moisture conditions can be maintained using more durable and more sustainable designs.


Exclusion: CIV575H1.

CIV380H1 SSustainable Energy Systems

III-AECIVBASC, IV-AEESCBASEI
3/-/1/0.50

This course will provide students with knowledge of energy demand and supply from local to national scales. Topics include energy demands throughout the economy, major energy technologies, how these technologies work, how they are evaluated quantitatively, their economics and their impacts on the environment. In addition, the ever changing context in which these technologies (and emerging technologies) are being implemented will be outlined. Systems approaches including life cycle assessment, will be refined and applied to evaluate energy systems. A particular focus will be placed on analysis of energy alternatives within a carbon constrained economy.


Prerequisite: CIV375H1, CIV220H1
Corequisite: CME368H1

CIV382Y1 YCivil Engineering Communication Portfolio

III-AECIVBASC
-/-/0.25/0.00

Students will assemble a portfolio of communication assignments drawn from their second and third year Civil Engineering courses as a showcase of their ability to meet the graduate attributes for communication. The student will demonstrate competence in discipline specific written, oral, and visual communication through the selection of assignments for the portfolio.  Each entry will be framed by a short introduction speaking to the context of the work and its significance in the portfolio.  Students whose communication work is not up to standard will be provided with opportunities for revision.  The course will be offered on a credit/no credit basis; students who receive no credit must retake the course in year 4.



CIV401H1 FDesign and Optimization of Hydro and Wind Electric Plants

I-AEESCBASEJ
3/-/2/0.50

The application of turbo-machinery including the design and operation of typical wind and hydroelectric plants from first principles to the various types of turbo-machines choices. Fundamental fluid mechanics equations, efficiency coefficients, momentum exchanges, characteristic curves, similarity laws, specific speed, vibration, cavitation of hydraulic turbines, pump/turbines; variable speed machines including transients and hydraulic stability. An introduction to overall system configuration and both component and system optimization.  Case studies.


Exclusion: EDV301H1, CIV301H1

CIV416H1 FReinforced Concrete II

IV-AECIVBASC, IV-AEESCBASEI
3/-/2/0.50

This course covers the behaviour and ultimate strength of reinforced concrete structures. Members subjected to flexure, axial load, shear and torsion are treated. Detailing of reinforcement, the design of floor systems and the design of shear walls are covered. An introduction to the seismic design of reinforced concrete structures is made. Emphasis is given to the relationship between recent research results and current building codes. A brief treatment of the behaviour and design of masonry walls is included.


Prerequisite: CIV313H1

CIV420H1 FConstruction Engineering

IV-AECIVBASC
3/-/2/0.50

This course considers the engineering aspects of construction including earthmoving, equipment productivity, fleet balancing, formwork design, shoring, hoisting, aggregate production, equipment operating costs, and modular construction. Several construction projects will be reviewed to demonstrate methods and processes. Students will be expected to visit construction sites, so safety boots and hard hats are required.



CIV440H1 SEnvironmental Impact and Risk Assessment

I-AECERFORE, IV-AECHEBASC,
IV-AECIVBASC, IV-AEESCBASEJ,
IV-AELMEBASC, IV-AEMECBASC,
I-AEMINENR, I-AEMINENV
3/-/1/0.50

Core Course in the Environmental Engineering Minor. The process and techniques for assessing and managing the impacts on and risks to humans and the ecosystem associated with engineered facilities, processes and products. Both biophysical and social impacts are addressed. Topics include: environmental assessment processes; environmental legislation; techniques for assessing impacts; engineering risk analysis; health risk assessment; risk management and communication; social impact assessment; cumulative impacts; environmental management systems; the process of considering alternative methods for preventing and controlling impacts; and stakeholder involvement and public participation. Examples are drawn from various engineering activities and facilities such as energy production, chemical production, treatment plants, highways and landfills.



CIV455H1 FCollaborative Design Project I

IV-AEESCBASEI
1/3/-/0.50

The first of two integrated design project courses that are focussed on a single problem that has both transportation and structural design elements. This course emphasizes transportation engineering design.  However, consideration of  structural engineering aspects are included, in preparation for the second course in the series.  Emphasis is on an integrated design process from conceptual design through to a constructible plan which addresses the functional, economic, aesthetic and environmental aspects of the problem.



CIV456H1 SCollaborative Design Project II

IV-AEESCBASEI
1/3/-/0.50

The second of two integrated design project courses that are focussed on a single problem that has both transportation and structural design elements. This course emphasizes structural engineering design.  However, consideration of  transportation engineering aspects are included, which are related to the first course in the series.  Emphasis is on an integrated design process from conceptual design through to a constructible plan which addresses the functional, economic, aesthetic and environmental aspects of the problem.


Prerequisite: CIV455H1

CIV460H1 FEngineering Project Finance and Management

IV-AEESCBASEI
3/-/1/0.50

This course deals with the structuring, valuing, managing and financing of infrastructure projects. The financing portion builds on material covered in Engineering Economics. Key topics include; structuring projects, valuing projects, the rationale for project financing (types of funds and financing), project viability and financial modeling, risk analysis, externalities and social cost benefit analyses. Financing of large scale projects by the public and private sectors as well as through public/private partnerships is treated in detail. Project management concepts, issues, and procedures are introduced. A series of case studies analyzing both successful and unsuccessful projects are examined.



CIV477H1 F/SSpecial Studies in Civil Engineering

IV-AECIVBASC
3/-/1/0.50

A course covering selected topics in Civil Engineering not covered in other electives. The topics, which may be different every year, are selected by Staff. Course may not be offered every year and there may be limited enrolment in particular years.


Enrolment Limits: Permission of the Department of Civil Engineering is required.

CIV488H1 SEntrepreneurship and Business for Engineers

I-AECERBUS, I-AEMINBUS
3/-/2/0.50

A complete introduction to small business formation, management and wealth creation. Topics include: the nature of the Entrepreneur and the Canadian business environment; business idea search and Business Plan construction; Buying a business, franchising, taking over a family business; Market research and sources of data; Marketing strategies promotion, pricing, advertising, electronic channels and costing; The sales process and management, distribution channels and global marketing; Accounting, financing and analysis, sources of funding, and financial controls; The people dimension: management styles, recruiting and hiring, legal issues in employment and Human Resources; Legal forms of organization and business formation, taxation, intellectual property protection; the e-Business world and how businesses participate; Managing the business: location and equipping the business, suppliers and purchasing, credit, ethical dealing; Exiting the business and succession, selling out. A full Business Plan will be developed by each student and the top submissions will be entered into a Business Plan competition with significant cash prices for the winners. Examples will be drawn from real business situations including practicing entrepreneurs making presentations and class visits during the term. (Identical courses are offered in other Departments: MSE488H1, MIE488H1, ECE488H1 and CHE488H1.)

*Complementary Studies Elective


Exclusion: APS234H1, APS432H1

CIV498H1 SGroup Design Project

IV-AECIVBASC
-/-/3/0.50

The Group Design Project is a significant design experience that integrates the mathematics, basic sciences, engineering sciences, complementary studies, and detailed design aspects of the different civil engineering sub-disciplines.


Exclusion: APS490Y1

CIV499H1 YIndividual Project
-/-/3/0.50

Individual Projects are arranged between the student and a supervising faculty member. The individual project can have either a design project focus or a research focus. If the focus is on design then the design project can be either motivated by the CIV498H1 Group Design Project and MIN466 Mineral Project Design experience, or it can be entirely new. The student’s work must culminate in a final design report or a thesis, as well as an oral presentation. The grading of both the final written submission as well as the oral presentation is carried out by the supervising faculty member.  The Individual Project may be undertaken only once, either in the Fall (F) or Winter (S) Session (0.5 weight), or as a full year (Y) course (1.0 weight). 



CIV510H1 SSolid Mechanics II

I-AECERFORE, IV-AECIVBASC,
IV-AEESCBASEI
3/-/2/0.50

This course provides a continuing study of the mechanics of deformable solids. Stress and equilibrium conditions, strain and compatibility conditions, stress-strain relations and yield/failure criteria are considered in the context of civil engineering materials. Two-and three-dimensional elasticity theory is developed, with an introduction to the use of tensor notation. Advanced topics in bending, shear and torsion of beams are also covered, as is elementary plate bending theory. The course concludes with a further development and application of energy methods including virtual work, potential energy, strain energy, and related approaches.


Prerequisite: CIV210H1 or CME210H1

CIV513H1 SCollaborative Engineering and Architectural Design Studio
1/5/-/0.50

Engineering and Architecture students are paired to form a design team for a specified building design project. Lectures are given on design development, aspects of structural system design, the relationship of structure to program and function, modeling and drawing, digital modeling, as well as topics related to the specific term design project. Studio design experience to familiarize students with both the synergistic and divergent goals of the engineering and architectural design and to develop collaboration skills for optimizing the outcome of the interdisciplinary professional interaction. Architecture students in this joint studio are enrolled in ARC3016Y S.


Prerequisite: CIV313H1/CIV352H1, CIV357H1
Enrolment Limits: Enrolment will be limited to students enrolled in the Yolles Design section of CIV498H. Graduate students may take this course by application only.

CIV514H1 FConcrete Technology

IV-AECIVBASC, IV-AEESCBASEI
3/-/2/0.50

Material aspects of concrete production will be dealt with in the context of various performance criteria with emphasis on durability. The process of material selection, proportioning, mixing, transporting, placing and curing concrete will be the framework within which topics such as: the use of admixtures, choice of cements, environmental influences, methods of consolidation and testing techniques will be studied.


Prerequisite: CIV209H1

CIV515H1 FIntroduction to Structural Dynamics

IV-AECIVBASC, IV-AEESCBASEI
3/-/1/0.50

The concept of dynamic equilibrium and corresponding equation of motion will be introduced.  The theoretical solution of a songle degree of freedom system will be derived and the effects of verious types of loads, such as impulse load, sinusoidal load, or random vibration on the structural response will be discussed.  To solve dynamic problems of multi-degree of freedom (MDOF) systems, concepts of mass, stiffness, and damping matrix will be introduced, which will be followed by eigen value analysis and modal analysis.  The concepts of Fourier Transformation will be introduced, which will be used to interpret dynamic responses of structures or dynamic nature of applied loads.  Dynamic experiments of elastic systems will be demonstrated using an educational shaking table.


Prerequisite: CIV312H1 and CIV313H1 or equivalent

CIV516H1 SPublic Transit Operations and Planning

IV-AECIVBASC, III-AEESCBASEI
3/-/1/0.50

This course covers a broad range of topics in urban transit operations and planning, with special emphasis on best-practice strategies of modern transit systems. The course will help students: Learn the history of transit and its relationship to urban development, emerging challenges, transit role in society, and new trends and issues; Understand and analyze the factors that affect transit performance and demand; Identify and analyze transit operational and planning problems; Identify possible solutions at the operational level (mostly short-term and line-based) and the strategic level (mostly long-term and network-based), and assess alternative solutions; Understand the relative performance of various transit modes (both conventional and new modes) and their domains of application; and gain knowledge of best-practice transit systems planning and emerging innovations.



CIV517H1 FPrestressed Concrete

IV-AECIVBASC, IV-AEESCBASEI
3/-/-/0.50

An introduction to procedures for predicting the load-deformation response of prestressed concrete elements and structures with emphasis on how these procedures can be used in the design of new structures and in the evaluation of existing structures. Topics include: prestressing technology; control of cracking; response to axial load and flexure; response to shear and torsion; disturbed regions; restraint of deformations; design codes.


Prerequisite: CIV313H1 or CIV357H1 or equivalent.

CIV518H1 SBehaviour and Design of Steel Structures

IV-AECIVBASC, IV-AEESCBASEI
3/-/2/0.50

The behaviour and design of trusses, frames, members and connections in steel building and bridge structures is presented and design methods are developed. Ultimate strength, stability, and postbuckling are emphasized in topical examples including: plate girders, composite steel/concrete girders, second-order frame behaviour, high-strength bolted and welded framing connections. Design applications considering metal fatigue and brittle fracture, and methods of plastic analysis are also introduced. Canadian design standards and the Limit States Design concepts are used.



CIV519H1 FStructural Analysis II

IV-AECIVBASC
3/-/2/0.50

The general flexibility and stiffness methods of analysis; multispan beams, trusses, frames and grids; loadings due to force, support displacement, temperature change and member prestrain; axial and flexural stability; basic plasticity.  Topics in this course represent the basis for the finite element method of analysis.


Prerequisite: CIV214H1

CIV521H1 FRock Mechanics

IV-AECIVBASC
3/1/-/0.50

This course provides general analytical tools and experimental methods that are used in rock mechanics. The lectures are complemented with laboratory experiments. Theoretical topics include: stress and strain, linear elasticity, failure modes and models of rocks, fracture of rocks, inelastic behavior of rock, seismic waves in rocks.
Experiments include: preparation of rock samples, uniaxial compressive strength measurements, Brazilian disc tests for rock tensile strength, fracture toughness measurements with core-based rock samples.


Prerequisite: CIV210H1/CME210H1

CIV523H1 SGeotechnical Design

IV-AECIVBASC, IV-AEESCBASEI,
IV-AELMEBASC
3/-/1/0.50

This course is built around a transportation project that contains all the essential geotechnical investigation and design elements and illustrates how they all come together on a  project.  The students will be taken through the entire design process from project initiation to construction.   In essence, the project will include a bridge over a river with some property constraints requiring the use of a retaining wall as well as deep and shallow foundations and some groundwater control.  The highway will require a soil cut.  One section crosses a low-lying swampy area that will require embankment construction over deep soft soils.  A short tunnel section is planned beneath a railway that cannot be taken out of service.  A pavement design will be required along the entire route as well as materials testing and construction monitoring.


Prerequisite: CIV321H1/CME321H1; equivalent or permission of instructor

CIV531H1 FTransport Planning

IV-AECIVBASC, III-AEESCBASEI,
I-AEMINENR, I-AEMINENV
3/-/1/0.50

This course is intended to provide the student with the following: the ability to design and execute an urban transportation planning study; a working knowledge of transportation planning analysis skills including introductions to travel demand modelling, analysis of environmental impacts, modelling transportation - land use interactions and transportation project evaluation; an understanding of current transportation planning issues and policies; and an understanding of the overall process of transportation planning and its role within the wider context of transportation decision-making and the planning and design of urban areas. Person-based travel in urban regions is the focus of this course, but a brief introduction to freight and intercity passenger transportation is also provided. A “systems” approach to transportation planning and analysis is introduced and maintained throughout the course. Emphasis is placed throughout on designing transportation systems for long-run environmental, social, and economic sustainability.


Prerequisite: CIV368H1 / CME368H1

CIV541H1 FEnvironmental Biotechnology

IV-AECIVBASC, I-AEMINBIO,
I-AEMINENV
3/-/-/0.50

Principles involved in the design and operation of biologically-based treatment facilities are covered with considerations for energy efficiency and sustainability.  The course includes water / wastewater biological unit operations, advanced treatment, sludge processing and composting, natural treatment systems and specialized bioengineered systems such as groundwater remediation and biological air treatment.


Prerequisite: CIV342H1 or equivalent.

CIV549H1 FGroundwater Flow and Contamination

IV-AECHEBASC, IV-AECIVBASC,
IV-AELMEBASC, I-AEMINENV
3/-/1/0.50
Mechanics of saturated and unsaturated fluid flow in porous media. Confined and unconfined flow. Flow to wells. Analytical and numerical solutions of groundwater flow equations. Non-reactive and reactive contaminant transport on groundwater systems. Analytical and numerical solutions of contaminant transport equations. Flow and solute transport in fractured porous media. Assessment of environmental impacts of waste disposal operations. Remediation of contaminated groundwater.
Prerequisite: JVM270H1/CIV270H1/CME270H1, CIV250H1/EDV250H1 S or equivalent

CIV550H1 FWater Resources Engineering

IV-AECHEBASC, IV-AECIVBASC,
I-AEMINENV
3/-/2/0.50
Global and national water problems, law and legislation. Hydraulic structures. Reservoir analysis. Urban drainage and runoff control: meteorologic data analysis, deterministic and stochastic modelling techniques. Flood control: structural and nonstructural alternatives. Power generation: hydro and thermal power generation. Low flow augmentation. Economics and decision making.
Prerequisite: CIV250H1/EDV250H1, CIV340H1 S or equivalent

CIV575H1 FStudies in Building Science

IV-AEESCBASEI, IV-AEESCBASEJ,
I-AEMINENV
3/-/2/0.50

This course examines the basic principles governing the control of heat, moisture and air movement in buildings and presents the fundamentals of building enclosure design. With this background, students are required to research advanced topics related to emerging areas of Building Science, and to write and present to the class an individual comprehensive paper related to their research. Lectures for this course will be jointly offered with those of CIV375H1.


Exclusion: CIV375H1.

CIV576H1 SSustainable Buildings

IV-AECIVBASC, IV-AEESCBASEI,
IV-AEESCBASEJ, I-AEMINENR,
I-AEMINENV
3/-/1/0.50

Building systems including the thermal envelope, heating and cooling systems, as well as water and lighting systems are examined with a view to reducing the net energy consumed within the building. Life-cycle economic and assessment methods are applied to the evaluation of various design options including considerations of embodied energy and carbon sequestration. Green building strategies including natural ventilation, passive solar, photovoltaics, solar water heaters, green roofs and geothermal energy piles are introduced. Following the application of these methods, students are introduced to efficient designs including LEED designs that lessen the impact of buildings on the environment. Exemplary building designs will be presented and analyzed.


Prerequisite: CIV375H1/CIV575H1 or equivalent.

CIV577H1 SInfrastructure for Sustainable Cities

IV-AECIVBASC, IV-AEESCBASEI,
I-AEMINENR, I-AEMINENV
3/-/1/0.50

Developing infrastructure for sustainable cities entails understanding the connection between urban morphology and physiology. This course uses a systems approach to analyzing anthropogenic material flow and other components of urban metabolism, linking them to the design of urban infrastructure. Elements of sustainable transportation, green buildings, urban climatology, urban vegetation, water systems and local energy supply are integrated in the design of sustainable urban neighbourhoods.


Prerequisite: CIV340H1, [CIV375H1/CIV575H1], CIV531H1.

CIV536H1 FUrban Activity, Air Pollution, and Health

IV-AECIVBASC, I-AEMINENV
3/-/-/0.50

This is an interdisciplinary course where the challenge of air pollution is introduced with a focus on urban areas. The interdependencies between transportation, air quality, and health are demonstrated. The city and the behaviour of its inhabitants constitute the context for the following course topics: overview of air pollutants in urban areas, urban air quality monitoring networks, mobile source emissions, air pollution and meteorology, atmospheric dispersion, chemical processes specific to cities, personal mobility and exposure to traffic-related air pollution, epidemiology of air pollution. 



CIV580H1 SEngineering and Management of Large Projects

IV-AECIVBASC
3/-/-/0.50

This technical elective course will investigate the role of stakeholders in major civil engineering projects; the complexities of managing project stages, multiple stakeholders, and technical challenges, and, social and environmental factors.

Each week includes a different speaker who can address issues related to technical, social, and environmental challenges in the project and how they were overcome.



CME499H1 F/SIndividual Project

IV-AECIVBASC, IV-AELMEBASC
-/-/3/0.50
Individual Projects are arranged between the student and a supervising faculty member. The individual project can have either a design project focus or a research focus. If the focus is on design then the design project can be either motivated by the CIV498H1 Group Design Project and MIN466 Mineral Project Design experience, or it can be entirely new. The student’s work must culminate in a final design report or a thesis, as well as an oral presentation. The grading of both the final written submission as well as the oral presentation is carried out by the supervising faculty member.  The Individual Project may be undertaken only once, either in the Fall (F) or Winter (S) Session (0.5 weight), or as a full year (Y) course (1.0 weight). 

Civil and Mineral Engineering


CME185H1 SEarth Systems Science

I-AECIVBASC, I-AELMEBASC
3/2/1/0.50

This course introduces students to the basic earth sciences with an emphasis on understanding the impact of humans on the natural earth systems. Beginning with a study of the lithosphere, principles of physical geology will be examined including the evolution and internal structure of the earth, dynamic processes that affect the earth, formation of minerals and rocks and soil, ore bodies and fossil- energy sources. Next, the biosphere will be studied, including the basic concepts of ecology including systems ecology and biogeochemical cycles. The influence of humans and the built environment on these natural systems will also be examined with a view to identifying more sustainable engineering practices. Finally, students will study the oceans and the atmosphere and the physical, chemical and thermodynamic processes involved in climate change.



CME210H1 FSolid Mechanics I

II-AECIVBASC, II-AELMEBASC
3/1.50/1.50/0.50

An introduction to the mechanics of deformable bodies. General biaxial and triaxial stress conditions in continua are studied, as are elastic stress, strain and deformation relations for members subjected to axial load, bending and shear. Properties of plane sections, moment-area theorems for calculating deflection, and Mohr’s circle representation of stress and of moment of inertia are examined, followed by a look at stability.


Prerequisite: CIV100H1/CIV101H1, MAT186H1, MAT187H1
Exclusion: CIV210H1

CME261H1 FEngineering Mathematics I

II-AECIVBASC, II-AELMEBASC
3/1/1/0.50

This course deals with both numerical methods for engineering analysis (solution of linear and non-linear equations, interpolation, numerical integration) and advanced topics in analytical calculus (multiple integrals and vector analysis). Within the numerical methods portion of the course emphasis is placed on problem formulation, solution algorithm design and programming applications. Within the analytical calculus portion emphasis is placed on the mathematical foundations of engineering practice and the interrelationship between analytical and numerical solution methods.


Prerequisite: MAT188H1, MAT187H1
Exclusion: CIV261H1

CME263H1 SProbability Theory for Civil and Mineral Engineers

II-AECIVBASC, II-AELMEBASC
3/-/2/0.50

Probability theory as the study of random phenomena in Civil and Mineral Engineering systems, including the definition of probability, conditional probability, Bayes’ theorem in discrete and continuous sample spaces. Common single and multivariate distributions. Mathematical expectation including mean and variance. Independence. An introduction to realizations of probability models and parameter estimation.


Exclusion: CIV263H1

CME270H1 FFluid Mechanics I

II-AECIVBASC, II-AELMEBASC
3/1.50/1/0.50

Fluid and flow characteristics, applications, dimensions and units. Fluid statics. One-dimensional flow including conservation of mass, energy and momentum. Introduction to dimensional analysis and similitude, laminar and turbulent flow, boundary layer concept, and flow about immersed objects. Calculation of flow in closed conduits and open channels.


Exclusion: CIV270H1

CME321H1 FGeotechnical Engineering I

III-AECIVBASC, III-AEESCBASEI,
III-AELMEBASC
3/1/1/0.50

An introduction to elements of geotechnical analysis and design. Shear strength at constant volume; ultimate limit state design of retaining walls, shored excavations, rafts, strip and spread footings, and piles and caissons. Compaction of granular soil; engineered fills for earth dams, roads, and backfills. Consolidation of fine grained soil; construction preloads and ultimate settlement predictions. Permeability, seepage analysis, and internal stability of granular soil; internal hydraulic design of coffer dams and zoned earth dams; construction dewatering. Site investigation and monitoring techniques in support of geotechnical design. Laboratories for unconfined compression, direct shear, groundwater flow models, and reinforced earth models.


Prerequisite: CIV270H1/CME270H1, CIV210H1/CME210H1
Exclusion: CIV321H1

CME358H1 FSurvey CAMP (Civil and Mineral Practicals)

III-AECIVBASC, IV-AEESCBASEI,
III-AELMEBASC
-/-/-/0.50

This two-week August field camp provides students with the opportunity to further their understanding of the vital interactions between the natural and the built environments.  Through fieldwork, students gain hands-on experience in the use of various field instruments used by Civil and Mineral Engineers.  The essentials of land surveying and the use of surveying instruments including Global Positioning Systems are taught as students carry out a series of field exercises that include route surveys, topographic surveys and construction surveys.  Survey calculations, sources of error, corrections and adjustments are also introduced.  In order to better understand our impact on the natural environment, students also perform several additional exercises.  These may include the measurement of river flows, remote sensing of soil and rock, remediation of a borrow pit, and the evaluation of the renewable energy potential of the wind and solar radiation. Note: This course requires payment of an extra fee for room and board.


Exclusion: CIV358H1

CME362H1 SEngineering Mathematics II

II-AECIVBASC, II-AELMEBASC
3/-/2/0.50

This course continues the study of numerical and analytical methods for civil engineering analysis. Analytical and numerical methods for solving ordinary differential equations are treated in some detail, followed by numerical solution methods for partial differential equations. The final major topic of the course deals with an introduction to optimization. Emphasis is placed throughout the course on problem formulation, solution algorithm design and programming applications.


Exclusion: CIV362H1

CME368H1 FEngineering Economics and Decision Making

I-AECERBUS, I-AECERENTR,
III-AECIVBASC, III-AELMEBASC,
I-AEMINBUS
3/-/1/0.50

The incorporation of economic and non-monetary considerations for making decision about public and private sector engineering systems in urban and other contexts. Topics include rational decision making; cost concepts; time value of money and engineering economics; microeconomic concepts; treatment of risk and uncertainty; and public project evaluation techniques incorporating social and environmental impacts including benefit cost analysis and multi-objective analysis.


Exclusion: CIV368H1

CME499Y1 YIndividual Project

IV-AECIVBASC, IV-AELMEBASC
-/-/3/1.00

Individual Projects are arranged between the student and a supervising faculty member. The individual project can have either a design project focus or a research focus. If the focus is on design then the design project can be either motivated by the CIV498H1 Group Design Project experience, or it can be entirely new. The student’s work must culminate in a final design report or a thesis, as well as an oral presentation. The grading of both the final written submission as well as the oral presentation is carried out by the supervising faculty member. The Individual Project may be undertaken in either the Fall (F) or Winter (S) Session, but not both (i.e., the Individual Project carries a maximum weight of 0.5; it cannot be made into a full year course)


Commerce


RSM430H1 FFixed Income Securities

IV-AEESCBASEF
2/-/-/0.50

Describes important fixed income securities and markets. The course emphasizes traditional bond and term structure concepts crucial to understand the securities traded in these markets. Students are required to work in the Rotman Financial Research & Trading Lab to solve the assigned problems using real time data. Not eligible for CR/NCR option. Contact Rotman Commerce for details.


Prerequisite: Rotman Commerce: RSM332H1; Actuarial Science: ACT349H1

RSM432H1 SRisk Management for Financial Managers

IV-AEESCBASEF
2/-/-/0.50

This course examines the ways in which risks are quantified and managed by financial institutions. The principal risks considered include market risk, credit risk and operational risk. The course also covers the evolution of bank regulation and the regulatory limits on risk taking. Not eligible for CR/NCR option. Contact Rotman Commerce for details.


Prerequisite: RSM333H1

RSM434H1 SFinancial Trading Strategies (formerly RSM412H1 Financial Trading Strategies)

IV-AEESCBASEF
2/-/-/0.50

This course will use finance theory applied with Excel applications to understand potential returns and risks inherent in particular investment/trading strategies. Learning-by-doing will be facilitated by simulation-based Rotman Interactive Trader cases focused on particular risks. This training will be analogous to using a flight simulator for learning to fly. Not eligible for CR/NCR option. Contact Rotman Commerce for details.


Prerequisite: RSM332H1
Exclusion: RSM412H1 Financial Trading Strategies

Computer Science


CSC180H1 FIntroduction to Computer Programming

I-AEESCBASE
3/3/-/0.50

The first of two courses that introduces students to programming and computational thinking, and prepares them for additional study across a breadth of programming fields. Students will learn to use the Python programming language to design and implement computational solutions to problems drawn from their 1F courses, with specific focus on algorithms, data structures, problem decomposition, and the use of programming paradigms appropriate to the problems being solved. Specifically, this course aims to have students work with and understand profiling and runtime analysis, searching and sorting algorithms, and the use of recursion.


Exclusion: APS105H1, APS106H1 or CSC192H1

CSC190H1 SComputer Algorithms and Data Structures

I-AEESCBASE
3/3/-/0.50

The second of two courses that introduces students to programming and computational thinking, and prepares them for additional study across a breadth of programming fields. Students will learn to use the C programming language to design and implement computational solutions to problems drawn from their 1S courses, and will explore new programming paradigms, algorithm design techniques, and data structures appropriate to these challenges. Specifically, this course aims to have students work with and understand linked lists, stacks, queues, trees, heaps, hashing, pointers (including function pointers) and arrays, data types and bit operations, and dynamic memory management.


Prerequisite: CSC180H1
Exclusion: APS106H1, CSC192H1, ECE244H1 or MIE250H1

CSC263H1 F/SData Structures and Analysis

IV-AEESCBASEF, III-AEESCBASEZ
-/-/-/0.50

Algorithm analysis: worst-case, average-case, and amortized complexity. Expected worst-case complexity, randomized quicksort and selection.  Standard abstract data types, such as graphs, dictionaries, priority queues, and disjoint sets. A variety of data structures for implementing these abstract data types, such as balanced search trees, hashing, heaps, and disjoint forests. Design and comparison of data structures. Introduction to lower bounds.


Prerequisite: CSC207H1, CSC236H1/CSC240H1; STA247H1/STA255H1/STA257H1
Exclusion: CSC265H1

CSC309H1 F/SProgramming on the Web

IV-AEESCBASER
2/-/1/0.50

An introduction to software development on the web. Concepts underlying the development of programs that operate on the web; survey of technological alternatives; greater depth on some technologies. Operational concepts of the internet and the web, static client content, dynamic client content, dynamically served content, n-tiered architectures, web development processes, and security on the web. Assignments involve increasingly more complex web-based programs. Guest lecturers from leading e-commerce firms will describe the architecture and operation of their web sites.


Prerequisite: CSC209H1
Recommended Preparation: CSC343H1

CSC318H1 F/SThe Design of Interactive Computational Media

IV-AEESCBASER, IV-AEESCBASET
2/-/1/0.50

User-centred design of interactive systems; methodologies, principles, and metaphors; task analysis. Interdisciplinary design; the role of graphic design, industrial design, and the behavioural sciences. Interactive hardware and software; concepts from computer graphics. Typography, layout, colour, sound, video, gesture, and usability enhancements. Classes of interactive graphical media; direct manipulation systems, extensible systems, rapid prototyping tools. Students work on projects in interdisciplinary teams.


Prerequisite: Any CSC half-course
Recommended Preparation: CSC300H1 provides useful background for work in CSC318H1, so if you plan to take CSC300H1 then you should do it before CSC318H1

CSC321H1 SIntroduction to Neural Networks and Machine Learning

III-AEESCBASEZ
-/-/-/0.50

The first half of the course is about supervised learning for regression and classification problems and will include the perceptron learning procedure, backpropagation, and methods for ensuring good generalisation to new data. The second half of the course is about unsupervised learning methods that discover hidden causes and will include K-means, the EM algorithm, Boltzmann machines, and deep belief nets.


Prerequisite: (MAT136H1 with a minimum mark of 77)/(MAT137Y1 with a minimum mark of 73)/(MAT157Y1 with a minimum mark of 67)/MAT235Y1/MAT237Y1/MAT257Y1, MAT221H1/MAT223H1/MAT240H1; STA247H1/STA255H1/STA257H1
Recommended Preparation: MAT235Y1/MAT237Y1/MAT257Y1

CSC326H1 FProgramming Languages

III,IV-AECPEBASC, III,IV-AEELEBASC,
IV-AEESCBASER
3/1.50m/1m/0.50

Study of programming styles and paradigms. Included are object-oriented scripting functional and logic-based approaches. Languages that support these programming styles will be introduced. Languages treated include Python, Lisp or Scheme and Prolog.


Exclusion: CSC324H1

CSC343H1 F/SIntroduction to Databases

III,IV-AECPEBASC, III,IV-AEELEBASC,
IV-AEESCBASEF, IV-AEESCBASER,
IV-AEESCBASET
2/-/1/0.50

Introduction to database management systems. The relational data model. Relational algebra. Querying and updating databases: the query language SQL. Application programming with SQL. Integrity constraints, normal forms, and database design. Elements of database system technology: query processing, transaction management.


Prerequisite: CSC165H1/CSC240H1/(MAT135H1, MAT136H1)/MAT135Y1/MAT137Y1/MAT157Y1; CSC207H1. Prerequisite for Engineering students only: ECE345H1/CSC190H1/CSC192H1
Exclusion: CSC434H1

CSC384H1 F/SIntroduction to Artificial Intelligence

IV-AEESCBASER, III-AEESCBASEZ,
I-AEMINRAM
2/-/1/0.50

Theories and algorithms that capture (or approximate) some of the core elements of computational intelligence. Topics include: search; logical representations and reasoning, classical automated planning, representing and reasoning with uncertainty, learning, decision making (planning) under uncertainty. Assignments provide practical experience, in both theory and programming, of the core topics.


Prerequisite: CSC263H1/CSC265H1, STA247H1/STA255H1/STA257H1
Recommended Preparation: CSC324H1

CSC401H1 SNatural Language Computing

IV-AEESCBASER, III-AEESCBASEZ
2/-/1/0.50

Introduction to techniques involving natural language and speech in applications such as information retrieval, extraction, and filtering; intelligent Web searching; spelling and grammar checking; speech recognition and synthesis; and multi-lingual systems including machine translation. N-grams, POS-tagging, semantic distance metrics, indexing, on-line lexicons and thesauri, markup languages, collections of on-line documents, corpus analysis. PERL and other software.


Prerequisite: CSC207H1/CSC209H1; STA247H1/STA255H1/STA257H1
Recommended Preparation: MAT221H1/MAT223H1/MAT240H1 is strongly recommended

CSC411H1 F/SMachine Learning and Data Mining

IV-AEESCBASEF, IV-AEESCBASER,
III-AEESCBASEZ, I-AEMINRAM
2/-/1/0.50

An introduction to methods for automated learning of relationships on the basis of empirical data. Classification and regression using nearest neighbour methods, decision trees, linear models, and neural networks. Clustering algorithms. Problems of overfitting and of assessing accuracy. Problems with handling large databases. Emphasis on statistical approaches.


Prerequisite: CSC263H1/CSC265H1, MAT(135H1,136H1)/MAT137Y1/MAT137Y1/MAT157Y1, STA247H1/STA255H1/STA257H1
Recommended Preparation: CSC336H1/CSC350H1, STA248H1/STA250H1/STA261H1

CSC412H1 SProbabilistic Learning and Reasoning

III-AEESCBASEZ
-/-/-/0.50

An introduction to probability as a means of representing and reasoning with uncertain knowledge. Qualitative and quantitative specification of probability distributions using probabilistic graphical models. Algorithms for inference and probabilistic reasoning with graphical models. Statistical approaches and algorithms for learning probability models from empirical data. Applications of these models in artificial intelligence and machine learning.


Prerequisite: CSC411H1

CSC418H1 F/SComputer Graphics

III,IV-AECPEBASC, III,IV-AEELEBASC,
IV-AEESCBASER
2/-/1/0.50

Identification and characterization of the objects manipulated in computer graphics, the operations possible on these objects, efficient algorithms to perform these operations, and interfaces to transform one type of object to another. Display devices, display data structures and procedures, graphical input, object modelling, transformations, illumination models, primary and secondary light effects; graphics packages and systems. Students, individually or in teams, implement graphical algorithms or entire graphics systems.


Prerequisite: CSC336H1/CSC350H1/CSC351H1/CSC363H1/CSC365H1/CSC373H1/CSC375H1/CSC463H1, (MAT135H1, MAT136H1)/MAT135Y1/MAT137Y1/MAT157Y1, CSC209H1/proficiency in C or C++;  Prerequisite for Engineering students only: ECE345H1 or ECE352H1
Recommended Preparation: MAT237Y1, MAT244H1

CSC428H1 SHuman-Computer Interaction

IV-AEESCBASER, IV-AEESCBASET,
I-AEMINRAM
2/-/1/0.50

Understanding human behaviour as it applies to user interfaces: work activity analysis, observational techniques, questionnaire administration, and unobtrusive measures. Operating parameters of the human cognitive system, task analysis and cognitive modelling techniques and their application to designing interfaces. Interface representations and prototyping tools. Cognitive walkthroughs, usability studies and verbal protocol analysis. Case studies of specific user interfaces.


Prerequisite: CSC318H1; STA247H1/STA255H1/STA257H1,(STA248H1/STA250H1/STA261H1)/(PSY201H1, PSY202H1)/(SOC202H1, SOC300H1); CSC209H1/proficiency C++ or Java
Recommended Preparation: A course in PSY; CSC209H1

CSC443H1 SDatabase System Technology

IV-AEESCBASER
2/-/1/0.50

Implementation of database management systems. Storage management, indexing, query processing, concurrency control, transaction management. Database systems on parallel and distributed architectures. Modern database applications: data mining, data warehousing, OLAP, data on the web. Object-oriented and object-relational databases.


Prerequisite: CSC343H1, CSC369H1, CSC373H1/CSC375H1

CSC444H1 FSoftware Engineering

III,IV-AECPEBASC, III,IV-AEELEBASC,
IV-AEESCBASER
3/1.50m/1m/0.50

The software development process. Software requirements and specifications. Software design techniques. Techniques for developing large software systems; CASE tools and software development environments. Software testing, documentation and maintenance.


Prerequisite: ECE344H1 or ECE353H1

CSC467H1 FCompilers and Interpreters

III,IV-AECPEBASC, III,IV-AEELEBASC,
IV-AEESCBASER
3/1.50m/1m/0.50

Compiler organization, compiler writing tools, use of regular expressions, finite automata and context-free grammars, scanning and parsing, runtime organization, semantic analysis, implementing the runtime model, storage allocation, code generation.


Prerequisite: ECE243H1 or ECE352H1

CSC485H1 FComputational Linguistics

III-AEESCBASEZ
-/-/-/0.50

Computational linguistics and the processing of language by computer. Topics include: context-free grammars; chart parsing, statistical parsing; semantics and semantic interpretation; ambiguity resolution techniques; reference resolution. Emphasis on statistical learning methods for lexical, syntactic, and semantic knowledge.


Prerequisite: STA247H1/STA255H1/STA257H1 or familiarity with basic probability theory, including Bayes's theorem; CSC207H1/CSC209H1 or proficiency in Python and software development.
Recommended Preparation: CSC324H1/CSC384H1

CSC486H1 SKnowledge Representation and Reasoning

III-AEESCBASEZ
-/-/-/0.50

Representing knowledge symbolically in a form suitable for automated reasoning, and associated reasoning methods. Topics from: first-order logic, entailment, the resolution method, Horn clauses, procedural representations, production systems, description logics, inheritance networks, defaults and probabilities, tractable reasoning, abductive explanation, the representation of action, planning.


Prerequisite: CSC384H1, CSC363H1/CSC365H1/CSC373H1/CSC375H1/CSC463H1
Recommended Preparation: CSC330H1

Earth Science


ESS221H1 FMinerals and Rocks

II-AELMEBASC
2m/3m/-/0.50

Systematic mineralogy (including: identification, classification and description), Physical and chemical properties of minerals. Crystallography and crystal systems (symmetry, crystal structure, crystal systems) Descriptions of rocks in hand samples. Optical techniques in mineral identification.


Exclusion: GLG206H1, ERS201H5, EESB19H3
Recommended Preparation: (CHM138H1,CHM139H1)/CHM151Y1

ESS222H1 SPetrology

II-AELMEBASC
2m/3m/-/0.50

Origin and classification of igneous, sedimentary and metamorphic rocks and their associated ore deposits. Emphasis is placed on formation of rock types in the context of plate tectonic theory, and the practical aspects of rock identification in hand sample and thin section.


Prerequisite: ESS221H1, ERS203H5, EESC36H3
Exclusion: GLG207H1

ESS241H1 FGeologic Structures and Maps

III-AELMEBASC
2m/3m/-/0.50

Field observations, description and classification of geological structures: stratigraphic and intrusive contacts, unconformities; relative age determination; folds and fold systems; faults and fault systems; boudinage, foliations and lineations; spherical projections and mechanical principles (stress, strain, rheology). Practical work focuses on reading geological maps, constructing cross-sections, and interpreting both in terms of geological processes and histories.


Exclusion: GLG345H1, EESC37H3
Recommended Preparation: (PHY131H1,PHY132H1)/(PHY151H1,PHY152H1)

ESS331H1 FSedimentation and Stratigraphy

IV-AELMEBASC
2m/3m/-/0.50

Formal principles of stratigraphy, types of stratigraphic unit, methods of dating and correlation (biostratigraphic methods, magnetostratigraphy, radiometric dating). Methods of study in surface and subsurface (outcrop measurement, elementary introduction to wireline logs, seismic methods). The principles of facies analysis; sediment transport - sedimentary structures, the flow regime, and sediment gravity flows. The carbonate factory and carbonate rock classification. Trace fossils. Laboratory exercises in understanding facies mapping, isopachs and isolith maps.


Prerequisite: ESS221H1
Exclusion: GLG360H1, ERS313H5
Recommended Preparation: ESS222H1, ESS330H1

ESS423H1 FMineral Deposits

IV-AELMEBASC
2m/3m/-/0.50

Geology and geochemistry of ore deposits. Origin and interpretation; systematic ore mineralogy, in hand specimen and reflected light microscopy.


Prerequisite: ESS322H1
Exclusion: GLG442H1

JGA305H1 FEnvironmental and Archaeological Geophysics

IV-AELMEBASC
2m/1m/-/0.50

Application of near-surface geophysical methods to investigate environmental and archaeological sites; in particular magnetometry, resistivity, ground-probing radar, and seismic surveys. Course will cover background on the various methods, and allow students to run field surveys and present on case studies.


Prerequisite: ESS241H1 or ANT200Y1 or GGR201H1

JPE395H1 SPhysics of the Earth (Formerly PHY395H1)

IV-AEESCBASEJ, IV-AEESCBASEP,
IV-AEESCBASER, I-AEMINENR
-/-/-/0.50

Designed for students interested in the physics of the Earth and the planets. Study of the Earth as a unified dynamic system; determination of major internal divisions in the planet; development and evolution of the Earth's large scale surface features through plate tectonics; the age and thermal history of the planet; Earth's gravitational field and the concept of isostasy; mantle rheology and convection; Earth tides; geodetic measurement techniques, in particular modern space-based techniques.


Prerequisite: PHY132H1/PHY152H1/PHY180H1/MIE100H1, MAT235Y1/MAT237Y1/MAT291H1/AER210H1, PHY254H1/PHY293H1/MAT244H1/MAT290H1/MAT292H1
Exclusion: PHY359H1, PHY395H1

JPE493H1 FSeismology (Formerly PHY493H1)

IV-AEESCBASEP
-/-/-/0.50

Why do earthquakes occur and how are they related to tectonic motion of the Earth's surface? What is the physics behind the propagation of seismic waves through the Earth, and how can it be used to determine the internal structures of the Earth? This introductory course is aimed at understanding the physics behind seismic wave propagation, as well as asymptotic and numerical solutions to the elastodynamic equation. Travel time and amplitude of seismic waves are discussed based on seismic ray theory, while numerical methods are introduced to obtain accurate solutions to more complex velocity structures. Seismic tomographic methods, including their applications to hydrocarbon reservoir imaging, are also covered.


Prerequisite: JPE395H1, APM346H1/APM351Y1
Exclusion: PHY493H1
Recommended Preparation: ESS345H1

Economics


ECO100Y1 YIntroduction to Economics

I-AEMINBUS
-/-/-/0.50

An introduction to economic analysis and its applications: price determination; the role of competition; international trade and finance; the theory of production and employment; the role of money and the banking system; monetary and fiscal policy. NOTE graphical and quantitative analysis are used extensively.


Exclusion: ECO105Y1
Recommended Preparation: MCV4U (Calculus & Vectors) and MHF4U (Advanced Functions), or equivalent secondary school mathematics credits

Electrical and Computer Engineering


ECE101H1 SSeminar Course: Introduction to Electrical and Computer Engineering

I-AECPEBASC, I-AEELEBASC
1/-/-/0.15

This is a seminar series that will introduce first year students to the wealth of subjects within the field of Electrical and Computer Engineering. Instructors will be drawn from the various research groups within the Department. This course will be offered on a credit/no-credit basis. Credit will not be given to students who attend fewer than 70% of the seminars. Students who receive no credit for the course must re-take it in their 2F session. Students who have not received credit for this course at the end of their 2F session will not be permitted to register in session 2S.



ECE110H1 SElectrical Fundamentals

I-AECPEBASC, I-AEELEBASC,
I-AEENGBASC, I-AEINDBASC,
I-AEMECBASC, I-AEMMSBASC
3/1m/2m/0.50

An overview of the physics of electricity and magnetism: Coulomb’s law, Gauss’ law, Ampere’s law, Faraday’s law. Physics of capacitors, resistors and inductors.  An introduction to circuit analysis: resistive circuits, nodal and mesh analysis, 1st order RC and RL transient response and sinusoidal steady-state analysis.

 



ECE159H1 SFundamentals of Electric Circuits

I-AEESCBASE
3/1.50/1/0.50

Topics include: DC linear circuit elements; DC linear circuit analysis; Kirchhoff’s Laws and superposition; Thevenin and Norton equivalents; nodal analysis; operational amplifier; transient response of linear circuits; sinusoidal steady state analysis; phasors; power in AC circuits; frequency response; and resonance phenomena.

 


Exclusion: ECE110H1 or ECE212H1
Recommended Preparation: MAT194H1 and ESC103H1

ECE201H1 FElectrical and Computer Engineering Seminar

II-AECPEBASC, II-AEELEBASC
1/-/-/0.15

This seminar introduces second year students to the various career pathways within the field of Electrical and Computer Engineering.  Instructors from various areas will talk about third and fourth year ECE courses in weekly seminars to guide students with the selection of upper year courses. The course also offers talks and advice to aid students transitioning into second year, as well as enhance students' skills such as stress management and time management.  This course will be offered on a credit/no credit basis.  Credit will not be given to students who attend fewer than 70% of the seminars.  Students who receive no credit for the course must re-take it in their 3F session.  Students who have not received credit for this course at the end of their 3F session will not be permitted to register for their 3S session.



ECE212H1 FCircuit Analysis

II-AECPEBASC, II-AEELEBASC
3/1.50m/2m/0.50

Nodal and loop analysis and network theorems. Natural and forced response of RL, RC, and RLC circuits. Sinusoidal steady-state analysis. Frequency response; resonance phenomena; poles and zeros; applications of the Laplace transform.



ECE216H1 SSignals and Systems

II-AECPEBASC, II-AEELEBASC
3/1/2/0.50

Fundamental discrete- and continuous-time signals, definition and properties of systems, linearity and time invariance, convolution, impulse response, differential and difference equations, Fourier analysis, sampling and aliasing, applications in communications.



ECE221H1 SElectric and Magnetic Fields

II-AECPEBASC, II-AEELEBASC
3/1m/2m/0.50

The fundamental laws of electromagnetics are covered, including Coulomb's law, Gauss' law, Poisson's and Laplace's equations, the Biot-Savart law, Ampere's law, Faraday's law, and Maxwell's equations. Vector calculus is applied to determine the relationship between the electric and magnetic fields and their sources (charges and currents). The interaction of the fields with material media will be discussed, including resistance, polarization in dielectrics, magnetization in magnetic materials, properties of magnetic materials and boundary conditions. Other topics include: electric and magnetic forces, the electric potential, capacitance and inductance, electric and magnetic energy, magnetic circuits, and boundary-value problems.



ECE231H1 SIntroductory Electronics

II-AECPEBASC, II-AEELEBASC
3/1.50m/2m/0.50

An introduction to electronic circuits using operational amplifiers, diodes, bipolar junction transistors and field-effect transistors.



ECE241H1 FDigital Systems

II-AECPEBASC, II-AEELEBASC
3/3m/-/0.50

Digital logic circuit design with substantial hands-on laboratory work. Algebraic and truth table representation of logic functions and variables. Optimizations of combinational logic, using “don’t cares.” Multi-level logic optimization. Transistor-level design of logic gates; propagation delay and timing of gates and circuits. The Verilog hardware description language. Memory in digital circuits, including latches, clocked flip-flops, and Static Random Access Memory. Set-up and hold times of sequential logic. Finite state machines - design and implementation. Binary number representation, hardware addition and multiplication. Tri-state gates, and multiplexers. There is a major lab component using Field-Programmable Gate Arrays (FPGAs) and associated computer-aided design software.



ECE243H1 SComputer Organization

II-AECPEBASC, II-AEELEBASC
3/3m/-/0.50

Basic computer structure. Design of central processing unit. Hardwired control. Input-output and the use of interrupts. Assembly language programming. Main memory organization and caches. Peripherals and interfacing. System design considerations. The laboratory will consist of experiments involving logic systems and microprocessors and a large open project. Design activity constitutes a major portion of laboratory work.



ECE244H1 FProgramming Fundamentals

II-AECPEBASC, II-AEELEBASC
3/2m/1m/0.50

Provides a foundation in programming using an object-oriented programming language. Topics include: classes and objects, inheritance, exception handling, basic data structures (lists, tree, etc.), big-O complexity analysis, and testing and debugging. The laboratory assignments emphasize the use of object-oriented programming constructs in the design and implementation of reasonably large programs.



ECE253H1 FDigital and Computer Systems

II-AEESCBASE
3/3/-/0.50

Digital system design principles. Logic circuits, logic synthesis. Registers, arithmetic circuits, counters, finite state machines, and programmable logic devices. Verilog hardware description language.  Computer structure, machine language instruction execution and sequencing, addressing techniques. Processors, input/output techniques, and memory hierarchy. The laboratory work consists of exercises involving the design of logic circuits, and microprocessor systems. Modern computer-aided design tools and FPGA technology are used. Design aspects constitute a major portion of laboratory work.


Exclusion: ECE241H1

ECE259H1 SElectromagnetism

II-AEESCBASE
3/-/1/0.50

The fundamental laws of electromagnetics are covered; including Coulomb's law, Gauss' law, Poisson's and Laplace's equations, the Biot-Savart’s law, Ampere's law, Faraday's law, and Maxwell's equations. Vector calculus is applied to determine the relationship between the electric and magnetic fields and their sources (charges and currents). Field-matter interaction is studied, including polarization in dielectric materials and magnetization in magnetic materials. Circuit elements such as the resistor, capacitor and inductor are introduced from an electromagnetic point of view. Other topics include: electric and magnetic forces, the electric potential, capacitance and inductance, electric and magnetic energy, magnetic circuits, boundary-value problems and transmission-lines.


Prerequisite: ECE159H1 and AER210H1
Exclusion: MAT291H1 or ECE221
Recommended Preparation: MAT292H1 and MAT185H1

ECE297H1 SCommunication and Design

II-AECPEBASC, II-AEELEBASC
2/2m/2m/0.50

An introduction to electrical and computer engineering design processes illustrated by the design and implementation of software systems. Creative development with appropriate organizational and reporting and recording activities, both oral and written, is emphasized. The general design cycle and pragmatic strategies used in the creation of small designs and larger systems are presented. These methods are implemented in practical lab work done in teams. Oral skills are developed in seminars and team discussions, by learning to handle questions, and by making formal presentations. Written skills are developed in reports related to the lecture and lab activities.



ECE302H1 F/SProbability and Applications

III,IV-AECPEBASC, III,IV-AEELEBASC
3/-/2m/0.50

Events, sample space, axioms of probability. Discrete and continuous random variables, distribution and density functions. Bernoulli trials, Binomial, geometric, Poisson, exponential and Gaussian distributions.
Expectation, moments, characteristic function and correlation coefficient.  Functions of random variables. Random vectors, joint distributions, transformations. Applications will be chosen from communication theory, estimation and hypothesis testing, predictive analytics and other areas of electrical and computer engineering.


Prerequisite: MAT290H1 and MAT291H1 and ECE216H1
Exclusion: STA286H1

ECE311H1 F/SDynamic Systems and Control

III,IV-AECPEBASC, III,IV-AEELEBASC
3/1.50m/1m/0.50

An introduction to dynamic systems and their control. Differential equation models of mechanical, electrical, and electromechanical systems. State variable form. Linearization of nonlinear models and transfer functions. Use of Laplace transform to solve ordinary differential equations. Conversion of models from state variable form to transfer function representation and vice versa. Block diagrams and their manipulation. Time response: transient analysis and performance measures. Properties of feedback control systems. Steady state tracking: the notion of system type. The concept of stability of feedback systems, Routh-Hurwitz stability criterion. Frequency response and stability in the frequency domain. Root locus. Bode and Nyquist plots and their use in feedback control design.


Prerequisite: MAT290H1 and MAT291H1 and ECE216H1

ECE314H1 FFundamentals of Electrical Energy Systems

III,IV-AECPEBASC, III,IV-AEELEBASC,
I-AEMINENR
3/1.50m/1m/0.50

Introduction to 3-phase systems, single line diagrams and complex power flow. Energy conversion via switch-mode power electronic circuits: DC/DC converters, DC/AC converters. Energy conversions via magnetic devices: Faraday's law for time varying fields, characterization of hysteresis and eddy current losses in magnetic materials, modelling of magnetic circuits, transformer and inductor modelling and design. Introduction to electromechanical energy conversion: Lorentz Force, concepts of energy, co-energy, forces between ferromagnetic materials carrying flux, simple magnetic actuators.


Prerequisite: ECE212H1 and ECE221H1 and ECE231H1
Exclusion: ECE315H1

ECE316H1 F/SCommunication Systems

III,IV-AECPEBASC, III,IV-AEELEBASC,
I-AEMINRAM
3/1.50m/1m/0.50

An introductory course in analog and digital communication systems. Analog and digital signals. Signal representation and Fourier transforms; energy and power spectral densities; bandwidth. Distortionless analog communication; amplitude, frequency and phase modulation systems; frequency division multiplexing. Sampling, quantization and pulse code modulation (PCM). Baseband digital communication; intersymbol interference (ISI); Nyquist’s ISI criterion; eye diagrams. Passband digital communications; amplitude-, phase- and frequency-shift keying; signal constellations. Performance analysis of analog modulation schemes in the presence of noise. Performance analysis of PCM in noise.


Prerequisite: (MAT290H1 and ECE216H1) or (MAT389H1 and ECE355H1)

ECE318H1 SFundamentals of Optics

III,IV-AECPEBASC, III,IV-AEELEBASC,
IV-AEESCBASEP, IV-AEESCBASER,
IV-AEESCBASET
3/1.50m/1m/0.50

Geometric Optics: Spherical surfaces, lenses and mirrors, optical imaging systems, matrix method, and aberrations. Polarization:  Polarizer and polarizations, anisotropic materials, dichroism, birefringence, index ellipsoid, waveplates, optical activity, Faraday effect. Interference: superposition of waves, longitudinal and transverse coherence, Young’s double-slit experiment, Michelson and Fabry-Perot interferometer, thin-films. Diffraction and Fourier Optics: diffraction theory, single and double slits, diffraction gratings, spatial filtering, basic optical signal processing.  (Background preparation in ECE320H1 F - Fields and Waves, or ECE357H1 S - Electromagnetic Fields, is strongly recommended.)


Prerequisite: ECE221H1 or ECE259H1

ECE320H1 FFields and Waves

III,IV-AECPEBASC, III,IV-AEELEBASC
3/1.50m/1m/0.50

Voltage and current waves on a general transmission line, reflections from the load and source, transients on the line, and Smith’s chart. Maxwell’s equations, electric and magnetic fields wave equations, boundary conditions, plane wave propagation, reflection and transmission at boundaries, constitutive relations, dispersion, polarization; Poynting vector; waveguides. 


Prerequisite: ECE221H1

ECE330H1 SQuantum and Semiconductor Physics

III,IV-AECPEBASC, III,IV-AEELEBASC,
I-AEMINNANO
3/-/2m/0.50

The course introduces the principles of quantum physics and uses them to understand the behaviour of semiconductors.  Topics to be covered include wave-particle duality, Schrodinger's equation, energy quantization, quantum mechanical tunnelling, electrons in crystalline semiconductors and other physical concepts that form the basis for nanotechnology, microelectronics, and optoelectronics.


Prerequisite: ECE221H1 and ECE231H1.
Exclusion: MSE235H1.

ECE331H1 FAnalog Electronics

III,IV-AECPEBASC, III,IV-AEELEBASC
3/1.50m/1m/0.50

Transistor amplifiers, including: differential and multistage amplifiers, integrated circuit biasing techniques, output stage design and IC amplifier building blocks. Frequency response of amplifiers at low, medium and high frequencies. Feedback amplifier analysis. Stability and compensation techniques for amplifiers using negative feedback.


Prerequisite: ECE212H1 and ECE231H1

ECE334H1 F/SDigital Electronics

III,IV-AECPEBASC, III,IV-AEELEBASC,
IV-AEESCBASER
3/1.50m/1m/0.50

Digital design techniques for integrated circuits. The emphasis will be on the design of logic gates at the transistor level. A number of different logic families will be described, but CMOS will be emphasized. Review of: device modeling, IC processing, and Spice simulation, simplified layout rules, inverter noise margins, transient response, and power dissipation, traditional CMOS logic design, transmission gates, RC timing approximations, input-output circuits, latches and flipflops, counters and adders, decoders and muxes, dynamic gates, SRAMs, DRAMs, and EEPROMs.


Prerequisite: ECE241H1 and ECE231H1 or ECE253H1 and ECE360H1

ECE335H1 FIntroduction to Electronic Devices

III,IV-AECPEBASC, III,IV-AEELEBASC,
I-AEMINNANO
3/-/2m/0.50

Electrical behaviour of semiconductor structures and devices. Metal-semiconductor contacts; pn junctions, diodes, photodetectors, LED’s; bipolar junction transistors, Ebers-Moll and hybrid-pi models; field effect transistors, MOSFET, JFET/MESFET structures and models; thyristors and semiconductor lasers. 


Prerequisite: MAT291H1 and ECE221H1 and ECE231H1
Exclusion: MSE235H1

ECE342H1 SComputer Hardware

III,IV-AECPEBASC, III,IV-AEELEBASC,
IV-AEESCBASEP
3/3m/-/0.50

Arithmetic circuits, cubical representation of logic functions, digital system design, timing analysis, design of asynchronous circuits, testing of logic circuits.


Prerequisite: ECE241H1 and ECE243H1

ECE344H1 F/SOperating Systems

III,IV-AECPEBASC, III,IV-AEELEBASC,
IV-AEMECBASC
3/3m/-/0.50

Operating system structures, concurrency, synchronization, deadlock, CPU scheduling, memory management, file systems. The laboratory exercises will require implementation of part of an operating system.


Prerequisite: ECE244H1 and ECE243H1
Exclusion: ECE353H1

ECE345H1 F/SAlgorithms and Data Structures

III,IV-AECPEBASC, III,IV-AEELEBASC,
I-AEMINRAM
3/-/2m/0.50

Design and analysis of algorithms and data structures that are essential to engineers in every aspect of the computer hardware and software industry. Recurrences, asymptotics, summations, trees and graphs. Sorting, search trees and balanced search trees, amortized analysis, hash functions, dynamic programming, greedy algorithms, basic graph algorithms, minimum spanning trees, shortest paths, introduction to NP completeness and new trends in algorithms and data structures.


Prerequisite: ECE244H1

ECE349H1 FIntroduction to Energy Systems

III-AEESCBASEJ, III-AEESCBASER,
I-AEMINENR
3/1.50/1/0.50

Established and emerging sources of electrical energy: hydroelectric, thermal, wind, and solar. Three-phase AC systems and complex power. Mechanisms for electrical-electrical energy conversion: power electronic systems for DC-DC conversion, single-phase DC-AC and three-phase DC-AC conversion, transformers for single-phase and three-phase AC-AC conversion. Electro-mechanical energy conversion via the synchronous machine. Fundamentals of AC electrical energy networks: frequency regulation, voltage regulation, and protection.



ECE350H1 SSemiconductor Electronic Devices

IV-AEESCBASEP, III-AEESCBASER,
I-AEMINNANO, III-AEMMSBASC
3/1.50/1/0.50

An explanation of the basic operation, design and limitations of semiconductor electronic devices, such as diodes and transistors.  The topics covered include:  electrons in semiconductors, semiconductors in equilibrium, transport of carriers, p-n diodes, metal-semiconductor contacts, bipolar junction transistors, metal-oxide-semiconductor (MOS) capacitors, and MOS field effect transistors. In addition, optoelectronic devices (e.g. photodiodes, light emitting diodes and lasers), semiconductor heterostructures, nanostructures and transistor scaling will be discussed.



ECE352H1 FComputer Organization

III-AEESCBASER
3/3/-/0.50

A continuation of some of the topics introduced in ECE253F, Digital and Computer Systems. Synchronous and asynchronous sequential circuits, pipelining, integer and floating-point arithmetic, RISC processors.



ECE353H1 SSystems Software

III-AEESCBASER, III-AEESCBASEZ,
I-AEMINRAM
3/3/-/0.50

Operating system structure, processes, threads, synchronization, CPU scheduling, memory management, file systems, input/output, multiple processor systems, virtualization, protection, and security. The laboratory exercises will require implementation of part of an operating system.



ECE354H1 SElectronic Circuits

III-AEESCBASER
3/1.50/0.50/0.50

A course on analog and digital electronic circuits. Topics include single-stage amplifiers, current mirrors, cascode amplifiers and differential pairs. Amplifier frequency response, feedback and stability are also covered. Digital CMOS logic circuits are introduced.



ECE355H1 FSignal Analysis and Communication

IV-AEESCBASEP, III-AEESCBASER,
IV-AEESCBASET, III-AEESCBASEZ
3/-/2/0.50

An introduction to continuous-time and discrete-time signals and systems. Topics include characterization of linear time-invariant systems, Fourier analysis, linear filtering, sampling of continuous-time signals, and modulation techniques for communication systems.



ECE356H1 SLinear Systems and Control

III-AEESCBASER
3/1.50/1/0.50

An introduction to dynamic systems and their control. Differential equation models of physical systems using transfer functions and state space models. Linearization. Initial and input response. Stability theory. Principle of feedback. Internal Model Principle. Frequencey response. Nyquist stability. Loop shaping theory. Computer aided design using MATLAB and Simulink.


Prerequisite: ECE355H1

ECE357H1 SElectromagnetic Fields

IV-AEESCBASEJ, III-AEESCBASEP,
III-AEESCBASER
3/1.50/1/0.50

An introduction to transmission line theory: voltage and current waves, characteristic impedance, reflections from the load and source, transients on the line, Smith’s chart, impedance matching. Fundamentals of electromagnetic theory: Maxwell’s equations, Helmholtz’s theorem, time retarded scalar and vector potentials, gauges, boundary conditions, electric and magnetic fields wave equations and their solutions in lossless and lossy medium. Plane wave propagation, reflection and transmission at boundaries. Constitutive relations and dispersion. Radiating dipole and waveguides.



ECE358H1 SFoundations of Computing

IV-AEESCBASEF, III-AEESCBASER,
I-AEMINRAM
3/-/1/0.50

Fundamentals of algorithm design and computational complexity, including: analysis of algorithms, graph algorithms, greedy algorithms, divide-and-conquer, dynamic programming, network flow, approximation algorithms, the theory of NP-completeness, and various NP-complete problems.



ECE360H1 FElectronics

III-AEESCBASEP, III-AEESCBASER
3/1.50/1/0.50

An introduction to electronics. Basic electronic circuits: introductory frequency-domain analysis, operational amplifiers, diodes, field-effect transistors, bipolar junction transistors, small-signal analysis, single-stage amplifiers.



ECE361H1 F/SComputer Networks I

III,IV-AECPEBASC, III,IV-AEELEBASC,
IV-AEESCBASER
3/1.50m/1m/0.50

Layered network architectures; overview of TCP/IP protocol suite. Introduction to sockets; introduction to application layer protocols. Peer-to-Peer Protocols: ARQ; TCP reliable stream service; flow control. Data Link Controls: Framing; PPP; HDLC. Medium access control and LANs: Aloha; Ethernet; Wireless LANs; Bridges. Packet Switching: Datagram and virtual circuit switching; Shortest path algorithms; Distance vector and link state algorithms.


Prerequisite: STA286H1 or ECE302H1
Corequisite: ECE302H1. (Students must take the co-requisite, ECE302H1 in the same term as ECE361H, OR in a term before taking ECE361H1.)

ECE363H1 SCommunication Systems

III-AEESCBASER, IV-AEESCBASET,
I-AEMINRAM
3/1.50/1/0.50

An introductory course in analog and digital communication systems. Analog and digital signals. Probability and random processes. Energy and power spectral densities; bandwidth. Distortionless analog communication; amplitude, frequency and phase modulation systems; frequency division multiplexing. Sampling, quantization and pulse code modulation (PCM). Baseband digital communication; intersymbol interference (ISI); Nyquist’s ISI criterion; eye diagrams. Passband digital communications; amplitude-, phase- and frequency-shift keying; signal constellations. Performance analysis of analog modulation schemes in the presence of noise. Performance analysis of PCM in noise.


Prerequisite: MAT389H1 and ECE355H1

ECE410H1 FControl Systems

III,IV-AECPEBASC, III,IV-AEELEBASC,
I-AEMINRAM
3/1.50m/1m/0.50

State space analysis of linear systems, the matrix exponential, linearization of nonlinear systems. Structural properties of linear systems: stability, controllability, observability, stabilizability, and detectability. Pole assignment using state feedback, state estimation using observers, full-order and reduced-order observer design, design of feedback compensators using the separation principle, control design for tracking. Control design based on optimization, linear quadratic optimal control, the algebraic Riccati equation. Laboratory experiments include computer-aided design using MATLAB and the control of an inverted pendulum on a cart.


Prerequisite: ECE311H1
Exclusion: ECE557H1

ECE411H1 SReal-Time Computer Control

III,IV-AECPEBASC, III,IV-AEELEBASC,
IV-AEESCBASER, IV-AEESCBASET,
III-AEESCBASEZ, I-AEMINRAM
3/1.50m/1m/0.50

Digital Control analysis and design by state-space methods. Introduction to scheduling of control tasks using fixed-priority protocols. Labs include control design using MATLAB and Simulink, and computer control of the inverted pendulum using a PC with real-time software.


Prerequisite: ECE311H1 or ECE356H1

ECE412H1 SAnalog Signal Processing Circuits

III,IV-AECPEBASC, III,IV-AEELEBASC,
IV-AEESCBASER
3/-/2m/0.50

An overview of analog signal processing in both continuous-time and discrete-time. Analog signal specifications. The design of analog filters including transfer function approximation using Matlab and implementation using active-RC, transconductance-C, and switched-capacitor circuits. Other topics include phase locked loops.


Prerequisite: ECE331H1 or ECE354H1
Exclusion: ECE512H1

ECE413H1 SEnergy Systems and Distributed Generation

III,IV-AECPEBASC, III,IV-AEELEBASC,
III-AEESCBASEJ, IV-AEESCBASER,
I-AEMINENR
3/1.50m/1m/0.50

Three-phase systems; steady-state transmission line model; symmetrical three-phase faults; power system stability; symmetrical components; unsymmetrical faults and fault current calculation; distribution network; equivalent steady-state model of voltage-sourced converter; distributed energy resources (DR); distributed energy storage; interface between DR and power system.


Prerequisite: ECE314H1 or ECE315H1 or ECE349H1 or ECE359H1

ECE417H1 FDigital Communication

III,IV-AECPEBASC, III,IV-AEELEBASC,
IV-AEESCBASER
3/1.50m/1m/0.50

Basic concepts of digital communication. Baseband data transmission, intersymbol interference, Nyquist pulse shaping, equalization, line coding, multi-path fading, diversity. Binary and M-ary modulation schemes, synchronization. Signal space concepts, optimum receivers, coherent and noncoherent detectors. Information theory, source encoding, error control coding, block and convolutional codes.


Prerequisite: ECE302H1 and ECE316H1, or STA286H1

ECE419H1 SDistributed Systems

III,IV-AECPEBASC, III,IV-AEELEBASC,
IV-AEESCBASER
3/1.50m/1m/0.50

Design issues in distributed systems: heterogeneity, security, transparency, concurrency, fault-tolerance; networking principles; request-reply protocol; remote procedure calls; distributed objects; middleware architectures; CORBA; security and authentication protocols; distributed file systems; name services; global states in distributed systems; coordination and agreement; transactions and concurrency control; distributed transactions; replication.


Prerequisite: ECE344H1 or ECE353H1

ECE422H1 SRadio and Microwave Wireless Systems

III,IV-AECPEBASC, III,IV-AEELEBASC,
IV-AEESCBASER
3/1.50m/1m/0.50

Analysis and design of systems employing radio waves, covering both the underlying electromagnetics and the overall system performance aspects such as signal-to-noise ratios. Transmission/reception phenomena include: electromagnetic wave radiation and polarization; elementary and linear dipoles; directivity, gain, efficiency; integrated, phased-array and aperture antennas; beam-steering; Friis transmission formula and link budget. Propagation phenomena include: diffraction and wave propagation over obstacles; multipath propagation; atmospheric and ionospheric effects. Receiver design aspects include: radio receiver architectures, receiver figures of merit, noise in cascaded systems, noise figure, and noise temperature. System examples are: terrestrial communication systems; satellite communications; radar; radiometric receivers; software-defined radio.


Prerequisite: ECE320H1 or ECE357H1

ECE424H1 FMicrowave Circuits

III,IV-AECPEBASC, III,IV-AEELEBASC,
IV-AEESCBASER
3/1.50m/1m/0.50

Losses in conductors and dielectrics; RF and microwave transmission lines; transients on transmission lines; matching networks; planar transmission lines (microstrip, stripline, coplanar waveguide); design with scattering parameters; 3- and 4-port RF devices (power dividers/combiners, couplers, isolators & circulators); coupled lines and devices; microwave active circuits (RF amplifiers, mixers, and receiver front ends); RF and microwave filters. The hands-on laboratories engage students in the design, simulation, fabrication, and test of practical passive and active microwave circuits using industry-standard RF/microwave simulation tools and measurement systems.


Exclusion: ECE524H1

ECE427H1 FPhotonic Devices

III,IV-AECPEBASC, III,IV-AEELEBASC,
IV-AEESCBASEJ, IV-AEESCBASEP,
IV-AEESCBASER, I-AEMINNANO
3/-/2m/0.50

This course introduces concepts for analyzing and designing photonic devices that serve a wide range of applications, such as communications, sensing, and energy harvesting.  Topics to be covered include light propagation in uniform and periodic media; optical waveguides; power splitters and couplers; wavelength filters; interferometers and resonators; amplifiers and lasers; photonic integration.


Prerequisite: ECE318H1 or ECE320H1 or ECE357H1.

ECE430H1 FAnalog Integrated Circuits

III,IV-AECPEBASC, III,IV-AEELEBASC,
IV-AEESCBASER
3/1.50m/1m/0.50

Review of MOSFET semiconductor device equations. Noise in electronic devices. Review of single-stage amplifiers and frequency response, including noise analysis. Basic CMOS op amp. Op amp compensation. Advanced op amp circuits: telescopic and folded-cascode op amps. Fully-differential op amps. Common mode feedback.


Prerequisite: ECE331H1 or ECE354H1
Exclusion: ECE530H1

ECE431H1 FDigital Signal Processing

III,IV-AECPEBASC, III,IV-AEELEBASC,
IV-AEESCBASEP, IV-AEESCBASER,
IV-AEESCBASET, III-AEESCBASEZ,
I-AEMINRAM
3/1.50m/1m/0.50

An introductory course in digital filtering and applications. Introduction to real world signal processing. Review of sampling and quantization of signals. Introduction to the discrete Fourier transform and its properties. The fast Fourier transform. Fourier analysis of signals using the discrete Fourier transform. Structures for discrete-time systems. Design and realization of digital filters: finite and infinite impulse response filters. DSP applications in areas such as communications, multimedia, video coding, human computer interaction and medicine.



ECE437H1 FVLSI Technology

III,IV-AECPEBASC, III,IV-AEELEBASC,
IV-AEESCBASER
3/3/-/0.50

The introduction to VLSI fabrication techniques, integrated circuit designs and advanced semiconductor devices will give a proper perspective of the past, present and future trends in the VLSI industry. Following the evolution of MOS and bipolar devices, digital and analog CMOS, BiCMOS, deep submicron CMOS, SOI-CMOS, RF-CMOS and HV-CMOS technologies will be studied. Special attention will be given to the physical scaling limits such as short channel effects. In addition, CAD tools and design methodology for the development of advanced semiconductor devices and integrated circuits will be introduced in the laboratory environment. These include the simulation of device fabrication, device characteristics, device modeling, circuit layout, design verification. Finally, advanced technology such as GaN HEMTs, graphene devices, carbon nano-tube devices, power devices, heterojunctions, InP and GaSb HBTs will also be studied.


Prerequisite: (ECE331H1 or ECE334H1 or ECE354H1) and (ECE335H1 or ECE350H1)
Exclusion: ECE535H1 and ECE534H1

ECE442H1 FIntroduction to Micro- and Nano-Fabrication Technologies

III,IV-AECPEBASC, III,IV-AEELEBASC,
IV-AEESCBASEP, IV-AEESCBASER,
IV-AEESCBASET, IV-AEMMSBASC
3/2m/1m/0.50

An introduction to the fundamentals of micro- and nano-fabrication processes with emphasis on cleanroom practices. The physical principles of optical lithography, electron-beam lithography, alternative nanolithography techniques, and thin film deposition and metrology methods. The physical and chemical processes of wet and dry etching. Cleanroom concepts and safety protocols. Sequential micro-fabrication processes involved in the manufacture of microelectronic and photonic devices. Imaging and characterization of micro- and nano-structures. Examples of practical existing and emerging micro- and nano-devices. Limited enrollment.

This course is not offered in 2016-17.


Prerequisite: ECE335H1 or ECE350H1

ECE445H1 FNeural Bioelectricity

III,IV-AECPEBASC, III,IV-AEELEBASC,
IV-AEESCBASER, IV-AEESCBASET,
III-AEESCBASEZ, I-AEMINBIO,
I-AEMINRAM
3/1.50m/1m/0.50

Generation, transmission and the significance of bioelectricity in neural networks of the brain. Topics covered include: (i) Basic features of neural systems. (ii) Ionic transport mechanisms in cellular membranes. (iii) Propagation of electricity in neural cables. (iv) Extracellular electric fields. (v) Neural networks, neuroplasticity and biological clocks. (vi) Learning and memory in artificial neural networks. Laboratory experiences include: (a) Biological measurements of body surface potentials (EEG and EMG). (b) Experiments on computer models of generation and propagation of neuronal electrical activities. (c) Investigation of learning in artificial neural networks.



ECE446H1 FSensory Communication

III,IV-AECPEBASC, III,IV-AEELEBASC,
IV-AEESCBASER, IV-AEESCBASET,
I-AEMINBIO
3/1.50m/1m/0.50

Physical acoustics, acoustic measurements, electroacoustic transducers, and physiological acoustics. Speech processing, speech recognition algorithms and signal processing by the auditory system. Engineering aspects of acoustic design. Electrical models of acoustic systems. Noise, noise-induced hearing loss, and noise control. Introduction to vision and other modalities. Musical and psychoacoustics.



ECE448H1 SBiocomputation

III,IV-AECPEBASC, III,IV-AEELEBASC,
IV-AEESCBASET, I-AEMINBIO
3/-/2m/0.50

Modern technologies in the biosciences generate tremendous amounts of biological data ranging from genomic sequences to protein structures to gene expression. Biocomputations are the computer algorithms used to reveal the hidden patterns within this data. Course topics include basic concepts in molecular cell biology, pairwise sequence alignment, multiple sequence alignment, fast alignment algorithms, deep learning approaches, phylogentic prediction, structure-based computational methods, gene finding and annotation.



ECE454H1 FComputer Systems Programming

III,IV-AECPEBASC, III,IV-AEELEBASC,
IV-AEESCBASER
3/3m/-/0.50

Fundamental techniques for programming computer systems, with an emphasis on obtaining good performance. Topics covered include:  how to measure and understand program and execution and behaviour, how to get the most out of an optimizing compiler, how memory is allocated and managed, and how to exploit caches and the memory hierarchy.  Furthermore, current trends in multicore, multithreaded and data parallel hardware, and how to exploit parallelism in their programs will be covered.



ECE461H1 FInternetworking

III,IV-AECPEBASC, III,IV-AEELEBASC,
IV-AEESCBASER
3/1.50m/0.50m/0.50

This course will cover the fundamentals of protocols for packet switching networks with emphasis on Internet type of networks including the following topics: the Internetworking concept and architectural model; data link layer (Ethernet and PPP); service interface; Internet addresses; address resolution protocol; Internet protocol (connectionless datagram delivery); routing IP datagrams; Internet control message protocol (error and control messages); subnet and supernet address extensions; ping program; traceroute program; user datagram protocol; reliable stream transport service (TCP); the socket interface; routing (GGP, EGP, IP, OSPF, HELLO); Internet multicasting; domain name system; applications such as HTTP, electronic mail, and SNMP; Internet security and firewall design; Ipv6, RSVP, flows, and ISIP.


Prerequisite: ECE361H1

ECE462H1 SMultimedia Systems

III,IV-AECPEBASC, III,IV-AEELEBASC,
IV-AEESCBASER
3/2m/-/0.50

Topics in the engineering area of multimedia systems with particular emphasis on the theory, design features, performance, complexity analysis, optimization and application of multimedia engineering technologies. Topics include sound/audio, image and video characterization, compression, source entropy and hybrid coding, transform coding, wavelet-based coding, motion estimation, JPEG coding, digital video coding, MPEG-1/2 coding, content-based processing, and MPEG-7.



ECE463H1 SElectric Drives

III,IV-AECPEBASC, III,IV-AEELEBASC,
III-AEESCBASEJ, IV-AEESCBASER,
I-AEMINENR
3/1.50m/1m/0.50

Electro-mechanical mechanisms for force and torque production in rotating machines. DC machine theory and DC machine dynamics, synchronous machines and their dynamics, stepper motors. Introduction to space vectors and vector control of AC machines.  Steady state and variable speed operation of the induction machine via V/f control.


Prerequisite: (ECE314H1 or ECE315H1) or ECE349H1 or ECE359H1

ECE464H1 SWireless Communication

III,IV-AECPEBASC, III,IV-AEELEBASC,
IV-AEESCBASER
3/1.50m/1m/0.50

The radio medium, radio communication system examples. Link budget: cable losses, propagation loss, antenna gains. Basic concepts of propagation: path loss, multi-path propagation and fading. Raleigh and Rician fading models, Doppler shift, delay spread, coherence time and coherence bandwidth of the channel. Analog modulation schemes and their bandwidths. Digital modulation schemes and their bandwidths and bit rates: BPSK, QPSK, MSK, GMSK. Basic concepts of speech coding. Error correction coding, interleaving, and multiple access frame structure. The physical layer description of the AMPS, IS-54, and GSM cellular systems. The cellular concept: frequency re-use, re-use cluster concept. Channel allocation. Cellular system architecture for AMPS, IS-54, and GSM. Hand-offs and transmitter power control. Cellular traffic, call blocking, concept of Erlangs. Basic ideas in spread spectrum modulation, spreading codes, bit error probability. Orthogonal and non-orthogonal CDMA Basic concepts in CDMA networks.


Prerequisite: ECE302H1 and ECE316H1 and ECE417H1, or STA286H1 and ECE417H1

ECE466H1 SComputer Networks II

III,IV-AECPEBASC, III,IV-AEELEBASC,
IV-AEESCBASER
3/1.50m/1m/0.50

Traffic modeling; network calculus; traffic classification; traffic regulation: shaping, filtering, policing, leaky bucket; queueing systems; scheduling; quality of service: Diffserv and IntServ/RSVP; multi-protocol label switching; call admission control / congestion control; switching; pricing; optical networks.


Prerequisite: ECE361H1

ECE469H1 SOptical Communications and Networks

III,IV-AECPEBASC, III,IV-AEELEBASC,
IV-AEESCBASEP, IV-AEESCBASER
3/1.50m/1m/0.50

This course provides an introduction to optical communication systems and networks at the system and functional level.  Applications range from telecommunication networks (short to long haul) to computing networks (chip-to-chip, on chip communications, optical backplanes).  Basic principles of optical transmission and associated components used for transmission of light and optical networks; system design tools for optical links; multi-service system requirements; optical network design tools (routing and wavelength assignment), network management and survivability.


Exclusion: ECE425H1 or ECE467H1

ECE470H1 F/SRobot Modeling and Control

III,IV-AECPEBASC, III,IV-AEELEBASC,
IV-AEESCBASER, IV-AEESCBASET,
IV-AEESCBASEZ
3/1.50m/1m/0.50

Classification of robot manipulators, kinematic modeling, forward and inverse kinematics, velocity kinematics, path planning, point-to-point trajectory planning, dynamic modeling, Euler-Langrange equations, inverse dynamics, joint control, computed torque control, passivity-based control, feedback linearization.

Not offered in Fall for 2015-16.


Prerequisite: ECE311H1 or ECE356H1
Exclusion: AER525H1

ECE472H1 F/SEngineering Economic Analysis & Entrepreneurship

I-AECERBUS, I-AECERENTR,
III,IV-AECPEBASC, III,IV-AEELEBASC,
I-AEMINBUS
3/-/2m/0.50

The economic evaluation and justification of engineering projects and investment proposals are discussed. Cost concepts; financial and cost accounting; depreciation; the time value of money and compound interest; inflation; capital budgeting; equity, bond and loan financing; income tax and after-tax cash flow in engineering project proposals; measures of economic merit in the public sector; sensitivity and risk analysis. Applications: evaluations of competing engineering project alternatives; replacement analysis; economic life of assets; lease versus buy decisions; break-even and sensitivity analysis. Entrepreneurship and the Canadian business environment will be discussed.



ECE488H1 FEntrepreneurship and Business for Engineers

I-AECERBUS, I-AEMINBUS
3/-/2/0.50

A complete introduction to small business formation, management and wealth creation. Topics include: the nature of the Entrepreneur and the Canadian business environment; business idea search and Business Plan construction; Buying a business, franchising, taking over a family business; Market research and sources of data; Marketing strategies promotion, pricing, advertising, electronic channels and costing; The sales process and management, distribution channels and global marketing; Accounting, financing and analysis, sources of funding, and financial controls; The people dimension: management styles, recruiting and hiring, legal issues in employment and Human Resources; Legal forms of organization and business formation, taxation, intellectual property protection; the e-Business world and how businesses participate; Managing the business: location and equipping the business, suppliers and purchasing, credit, ethical dealing; Exiting the business and succession, selling out. A full Business Plan will be developed by each student and the top submissions will be entered into a Business Plan competition with significant cash prices for the winners. Examples will be drawn from real business situations including practicing entrepreneurs making presentations and class visits during the term. (Identical courses are offered: MSE488H1F, MIE488H1F, CHE488H1S and CIV488H1S.)

*Complementary Studies Elective


Exclusion: APS234 and APS432

ECE496Y1 YDesign Project

IV-AECPEBASC, IV-AEELEBASC
1/-/1/1.00

A full year capstone design project course intended to give students an opportunity to apply their technical knowledge and communication skills. Working in teams under the direct supervision of a faculty member, students develop a design project of their choice from an initial concept to a final working prototype. In the first session, a project proposal is submitted early on, followed by a project requirements specification. A design review meeting is then held to review the proposed design. Lectures given during the first session will develop expertise in various areas related to design and technical communication. In the second session, the teams present their work in a number of ways, including an oral presentation, a poster presentation, a final demonstration at the Design Fair, an individual progress report, and a group final report. Course deliverables are evaluated by both the team’s supervisor and one of several course administrators.


Exclusion: APS490Y1

ECE514H1 FPower Electronics: Converter Topologies

III,IV-AECPEBASC, III,IV-AEELEBASC,
IV-AEESCBASEJ, IV-AEESCBASER,
I-AEMINENR
3/1.50m/1m/0.50

The course focuses on power electronics converters utilized in applications ranging from low-power mobile devices to high-power utility systems.  Basic principles of efficient electrical energy processing through switch-mode energy conversion and main converter groups (ac-dc, dc-dc, dc-ac and ac-ac) will be presented and analyzed.  Hard switching, resonant and quasi-resonant topologies will be covered.  The topics include:  converter components, loss mechanisms and converter efficiency, time-domain analysis (volt-second and capacitor charge balance) and converter modeling, frequency domain and state-plane analysis of converters operating in steady state.


Prerequisite: (ECE314H1 or ECE315H1) or ECE349H1 or ECE359H1

ECE516H1 SIntelligent Image Processing

III,IV-AECPEBASC, III,IV-AEELEBASC,
IV-AEESCBASER, III-AEESCBASEZ,
I-AEMINRAM
3/3m/-/0.50

This course provides the student with the fundamental knowledge needed in the rapidly growing field of Personal Cybernetics, including “Wearable Computing”, “Personal Technologies”, “Human Computer Interaction (HCI)," "Mobile Multimedia," "Augmented Reality," "Mediated Reality," CyborgLogging," and the merging of communications devices such as portable telephones with computational and imaging devices.  The focus is on fundamental aspects and new inventions for human-computer interaction.  Topics to be covered include: mediated reality, Personal Safety Devices, lifelong personal video capture, the Eye Tap principle, collinearity criterion, comparametric equations, photoquantigraphic imaging, lightvector spaces, anti-homomorphic imaging, application of personal imaging to the visual arts, and algebraic projective geometry.



ECE521H1 SInference Algorithms and Machine Learning

III,IV-AECPEBASC, III,IV-AEELEBASC,
IV-AEESCBASEF, IV-AEESCBASER,
III-AEESCBASEZ, I-AEMINRAM
3/-/2m/0.50

Squared error and the Gaussian probability distribution.  Maximum likelihood estimation.  Logistic regression, neural networks, radial basis function networks.  Occam's razor, validation, bagging, Bayesian techniques.  Auto-encoders, principal components analysis, clustering.  The EM algorithm.  Matrix factorization.  Markov models, hidden Markov models, the forward-backward algorithm, the Viterbi algorithm.  Factor graphs, Bayesian networks, variable elimination, the sum-product algorithm, the max-product algorithm.  Learning graphical models.  Applications to image classification, image processing, object tracking, speech recognition, telecommunications and genomics.


Prerequisite: STA286H1 or ECE302H1

ECE532H1 SDigital Systems Design

III,IV-AECPEBASC, III,IV-AEELEBASC,
IV-AEESCBASER, III-AEESCBASEZ,
I-AEMINRAM
3/3m/-/0.50

Advanced digital systems design concepts including project planning, design flows, embedded processors, hardware/software interfacing and interactions, software drivers, embedded operating systems, memory interfaces, system-level timing analysis, clocking and clock domains. A significant design project is undertaken and implemented on an FPGA development board.


Prerequisite: ECE342H1 or ECE352H1

ECE533H1 SPower Electronics: Switch-Mode Power Supplies

III,IV-AECPEBASC, III,IV-AEELEBASC,
IV-AEESCBASEJ, IV-AEESCBASER,
I-AEMINENR
3/1m/1m/0.50

The course covers the analysis, design and implementation of high-efficiency switched-mode power supplies (SMPS) used in modern electronic equipment.  Topics to be covered include: isolated and non-isolated SMPS topologies; steady-state analysis; component datasheets; small-signal modeling and control of non-ideal converters; compensator design; thermal and magnetic circuits; power semiconductor devices; protection and practical implementation issues.  The course includes an experimental design project, where teams design, solder and test a closed-loop dc-dc converter.


Prerequisite: (ECE314H1 or ECE315H1) or ECE349H1 or ECE359H1

ECE537H1 FRandom Processes

III,IV-AECPEBASC, III,IV-AEELEBASC,
IV-AEESCBASER
3/-/2m/0.50

Introduction to the principles and properties of random processes, with applications to communications, control systems, and computer science. Random vectors, random convergence, random processes, specifying random processes, Poisson and Gaussian processes, stationarity, mean square derivatives and integrals, ergodicity, power spectrum, linear systems with stochastic input, mean square estimation, Markov chains, recurrence, absorption, limiting and steady-state distributions, time reversibility, and balance equations.


Prerequisite: STA286H1 and ECE355H1 or ECE302H1
Corequisite: ECE355H1 (can be taken at the same time as ECE537H1)

ECE552H1 FComputer Architecture

III,IV-AECPEBASC, III,IV-AEELEBASC,
IV-AEESCBASER
3/1.50m/1m/0.50

Performance analysis and metrics and cost. Instruction set architectures. Instruction-level parallelism: pipelining, superscalar, dynamic scheduling, VLIW processors.  Data-level prallelism:  vector processors, GPUs.  Thread-level parallelism: multiprocessors, multi-core, coherence, simultaneous multi-threading.  Memory hierarchies: caches and virtual memory support.  Simulation tools and methods.  Limited Enrollment.


Prerequisite: ECE243H1 or ECE352H1

ECE557H1 FSystems Control

IV-AEESCBASEA, IV-AEESCBASER,
IV-AEESCBASET, IV-AEESCBASEZ,
I-AEMINRAM
3/1.50/1/0.50

State-space approach to linear system theory. Mathematical background in linear algebra, state space equations vs. transfer functions, solutions of linear ODE’s, state transition matrix, Jordan form, controllability, eigenvalue assignment using state feedback, observability, designing observers, separation principle, Kalman filters, tracking and the regulator problem, linear quadratic optimal control, stability. Laboratories cover the state space control design methodology.


Exclusion: ECE410H1

ECE568H1 F/SComputer Security

III,IV-AECPEBASC, III,IV-AEELEBASC,
IV-AEESCBASER
3/3m/-/0.50

As computers permeate our society, the security of such computing systems is becoming of paramount importance. This course covers principles of computer systems security. To build secure systems, one must understand how attackers operate. This course starts by teaching students how to identify security vulnerabilities and how they can be exploited. Then techniques to create secure systems and defend against such attacks will be discussed. Industry standards for conducting security audits to establish levels of security will be introduced. The course will include an introduction to basic cryptographic techniques as well as hardware used to accelerate cryptographic operations in ATM’s and webservers.


Prerequisite: ECE344H1 or ECE353H1

Engineering Communications Program


APS323H1 FWriting Lab

I-AECERCOM
2/-/2/0.50

This course uses writing in various modes as an exploratory process. Students strengthen their communication skills by exploring different expressive voices, each with a different potential to uncover and communicate ideas. A synthesis of various voices strengthens each of them; hence, by exploring their poetic, story-telling, scientific and analytic voices, students becomes better analytic, scientific or creative writers.


NOTE: This course is only offered in the summer term for 2017-18 academic year.

APS324H1 SEngineering and Social Justice

I-AECERCOM
2/-/2/0.50

This course explores the relationship between engineering and the concepts of social justice to develop the skills needed to take practical action in a complex world. It develops personal responses to ideas of justice, bias and marginalization as these affect Engineers and Engineering in general, domestically as well as globally, in projects as well as in contexts such as the workplace and academic environment. Readings will be drawn from current writers on Engineering and Social Justice and students will rehearse action through theatre techniques developed to enable communities to practice and critique action.


Engineering Science


ESC101H1 FPraxis I

I-AEESCBASE
3/-/2/0.50

Praxis I introduces students to the theory and practice of engineering design and communication. Through an integrated suite of interactive lectures, structured Design Studio activities, and multiple small-team projects, students explore core elements of these disciplines. Emphasis is placed on problem framing, divergent, convergent, and critical thinking, idea generation and selection, modelling and prototyping, efficient and effective teamwork, structuring design activities, constructing credible engineering arguments, and selected additional elements of engineering communication. Praxis I challenges students to explore the theories and principles that underpin engineering design and communication, to develop rigorous, individualized approaches to solving engineering problems, to adopt an outward looking and entrepreneurial engineering perspective, and to take an active role in shaping their future engineering studies.       


Exclusion: APS111H1

ESC102H1 SPraxis II

I-AEESCBASE
3/-/2/0.50

Praxis II follows from Praxis I and challenges students to apply, enhance, and refine their engineering design and communication skills. The design projects in Praxis II are both identified and defined by the students themselves, and focus on issues associated with the City of Toronto, its agencies and services, and its communities and citizens. In the first half of the course students, working in small teams, identify, frame, and document appropriate engineering challenges; in the second half they design, prototype, and present engineering solutions to a subset of those identified challenges. In support of these activities students continue to explore in greater depth the theories, tools, and practices of engineering design and communication. Praxis II culminates in an open showcase where students present their design solutions to representatives from interested governmental and non-governmental agencies, to their project stakeholders, and to the general public.


Prerequisite: ESC101H1
Exclusion: APS112H1

ESC103H1 FEngineering Mathematics and Computation

I-AEESCBASE
2/-/2/0.50

This course is designed to introduce students to mathematics in an engineering context, while exposing students to computational techniques. Topics include: vectors, lines and planes; 3-D visualization; matrices and transformations; matrix inverses, eigenvalues and determinants; solving linear systems; curve fitting and least squares; numerical integration and numerical solutions to differential equations. Course content is complemented with the use of MATLAB computational software.



ESC203H1 FEngineering and Society

II-AEESCBASE, I-AEMINENV
2/-/2/0.50

Through this course, students will examine the interrelations of science, technology, society and the environment (STSE), emphasizing a humanities and social sciences perspective. Students will consider models of ethical and critical thinking in order to develop their own framework for analyzing socio-technical issues. Students will have the opportunity to apply tools learned through persuasive writing and formal debate. Upon completion of the course, students will have an appreciation for the complex interaction between human society and technology, and models for how to analyze and evaluate the social, technological, political, and ethical dimensions of technology.

Humanities and Social Science elective.


Recommended Preparation: ESC102H1

ESC301H1 YEngineering Science Option Seminar

III-AEESCBASEA, III-AEESCBASEF,
III-AEESCBASEI, III-AEESCBASEJ,
III-AEESCBASEP, III-AEESCBASER,
III-AEESCBASET, III-AEESCBASEZ
1/-/-/0.25

The Option seminar supports discipline specific discussions of ethics, professionalism, safety and standards and research in a seminar-based setting. Guest speakers, presentations and other activities will highlight various topics of interest, including the present and future research related to the Option. This course will be offered on a credit/no credit basis and the assessment will be through a combination of written assignments, presentations and tests. Concepts in Engineering Communication will be emphasized to support discussion and the development of the course deliverables.



ESC401H1 STechnology & Society Student Directed Seminar
3/-/1/0.50

Humanities and Social Science elective.

Through this course, students have the opportunity to propose a topic for exploration in the realm of technology and society studies to run as a student-led seminar course. Accepted course topics in any given year will be based on student interest. The student course leader(s) are expected to work with the course coordinator to create a full course plan, including learning objectives, course topics and methods of assessment. All participants are expected to contribute to the learning experience, through presentations, suggestions of readings and subtopics. The student directed seminar provides an opportunity to explore a topic of interest, and gain experience in course planning and delivery in a collaborative learning environment. Suggested topics may include engineering & international development, engineering education & outreach, the politicization of science, gender & technology, or cross-profession collaboration; however, students may propose any topic in the broad realm of technology and society studies. Deadlines for student directed seminar proposals and seminar registration will be publicized by the Division of Engineering Science.



ESC470H1 SEnergy Systems Capstone Design

I-AEESCBASEJ, IV-AEESCBASER
-/-/5/0.50

A half-year capstone design course in which students work in teams to apply the engineering design, technical, and communication skills learned previously, while refining their skills in teamwork and project management. The course focus is on context-appropriate energy systems design and simulation, incorporating generation, transmission and storage of energy from across a range of traditional and alternative energy sources. Students identify, frame, and design solutions to problems that align with that focus, and the resulting designs are assessed on their engineering quality and design credibility. In addition, each student engages in individual critical reflection on their course activities, team performance, and on their growth as an engineering designer across their undergraduate program. Students are supported by a teaching team comprising both design and domain experts.       


Exclusion: APS490Y1

ESC471H1 FEngineering Science Capstone Design

IV-AEESCBASEP
-/-/5/0.50

A half-year capstone design course in which students work in small teams to apply the engineering design, technical, and communication skills learned previously, while refining their skills in teamwork and project management. The course focus is the (re)design and implementation of experiments suitable for the undergraduate classroom or laboratory. Students identify, frame, and design solutions to problems that align with that focus, and the resulting designs are assessed on their engineering quality and design credibility. In addition, each student engages in individual critical reflection on their course activities, team performance, and on their growth as an engineering designer across their undergraduate program. Students are supported by a teaching team comprising both design and domain experts.


Exclusion: APS490Y1

ESC472H1 SElectrical and Computer Capstone Design

IV-AEESCBASER
-/-/5/0.50

A half-year capstone design course in which students work in small teams to apply the engineering design, technical, and communication skills learned previously, while refining their skills in teamwork and project management. The course focus is on innovative, entrepreneurial engineering design, that results in a functional prototype. Students identify, frame, and design solutions to problems that align with that focus, and the resulting designs are assessed on their engineering quality and design credibility. In addition, each student engages in individual critical reflection on their course activities, team performance, and on their growth as an engineering designer across their undergraduate program. Students are supported by a teaching team comprising both design and domain experts.


Exclusion: APS490Y1

ESC490H1 F/SEngineering Science Independent Study
-/-/6/0.50

Independent study courses are student initiated projects, open to Engineering Science students, which allow students to work one-on-one with a division faculty member. The student and supervising faculty member will develop a learning plan for the semester within the first week of term (Limited Enrollment).



ESC499H1 F/SThesis

IV-AEESCBASEA, IV-AEESCBASEI
3/2/-/0.50

Every student in Fourth Year Engineering Science is required to conduct a thesis on an approved subject under the supervision of any faculty member at the University of Toronto. The thesis provides students with an opportunity to conduct, document, and experience engineering related research as an undergraduate student. This course is structured to provide resources to support that process, in particular the documentation of research, through a series of lectures and workshops. While the final thesis document is the main deliverable, students are also required to submit a set of interim deliverables to support ongoing documentation and reflection.


Exclusion: CHE499Y1
Recommended Preparation: Recommended Preparation: ESC301H1

ESC499Y1 YThesis

IV-AEESCBASEA, IV-AEESCBASEF,
I-AEESCBASEJ, IV-AEESCBASEP,
IV-AEESCBASER, IV-AEESCBASET,
IV-AEESCBASEZ
3/2/-/1.00

Every student in Fourth Year Engineering Science is required to conduct a thesis on an approved subject under the supervision of any faculty member at the University of Toronto. The thesis provides students with an opportunity to conduct, document, and experience engineering related research as an undergraduate student. This course is structured to provide resources to support that process, in particular the documentation of research, through a series of lectures and workshops. While the final thesis document is the main deliverable, students are also required to submit a set of interim deliverables to support ongoing documentation and reflection.


Exclusion: CHE499Y1
Recommended Preparation: ESC301H1

Environment


ENV221H1 FMultidisciplinary Perspectives on Environment (formerly ENV222Y1)

I-AEMINENV
-/-/-/0.50

One of two foundation courses for the School’s undergraduate program. Introduces students to ways in which different disciplines contribute to our understanding of environment. Instructors and guest lecturers are drawn from the sciences, social sciences and the humanities and will present subject matter, assumptions, conceptualizations and methodologies of their disciplines.


Exclusion: ENV222Y1/GGR222Y1/JGE221Y1

ENV222H1 SInterdisciplinary Environmental Studies (formerly ENV222Y1)

I-AEMINENV
-/-/-/0.50

Building upon ENV221H1, shows how environmental studies is working to knit different disciplinary perspectives into one interdisciplinary body of knowledge; interplay of science and values in definition and framing of issues; roles of markets, politics and ethics in developing solutions; local to global scale; historical and current timeframes.


Exclusion: ENV222Y1/GGR222H1/GGR222Y1/JGE221Y1/JIE222Y1 Note: GGR222H1 as an exclusion for ENV222H1 does not apply for the Winter 2011 offering of the ENV222H1/GGR222H1 combined course.

ENV333H1 FEcological Worldviews

I-AECERGLOB
-/-/-/0.50

Approaches to environmental concerns are often marked by assumptions that reflect distinct worldviews positing particular understandings of the role of the human with respect to nature. This course explores sundry economic, political, scientific, religious, and moral worldviews pertaining to the environment, including environmental ethics, Gaia, ecofeminism, scientific cosmology, and aboriginal perspectives.


Prerequisite: (ENV221H1,ENV222H1)
Exclusion: INI333H1 (2005-06 academic year and before)

ENV346H1 FTerrestrial Energy Systems

III-AEESCBASEJ
3/-/3/0.50

Various earth systems for energy transformation, storage and transport are explored. Geological, hydrological, biological, cosmological and oceanographic energy systems are considered in the context of the Earth as a dynamic system, including the variation of solar energy received by the planet and the redistribution of this energy through various radiative, latent and sensible heat transfer mechanisms. It considers the energy redistribution role of large-scale atmospheric systems, of warm and cold ocean currents, the role of the polar regions, and the functioning of various hydrological systems. The contribution and influence of tectonic systems on the surface systems is briefly introduced, as well the important role of energy storage processes in physical and biological systems, including the accumulation of fossil fuel reserves.


Prerequisite: MAT135Y1/MAT137Y1/JMB170Y1;BIO120H1/BIO150Y1/CHM136H1/CHM138H1/CHM1135H1/CHM139H1/CHM151Y1/PHY131H1/PHY132H1/PHY151H1/PHY152H1

ENV350H1 FEnergy Policy and Environment

I-AEMINENR, I-AEMINENV
-/-/-/0.50

The course addresses: (1) physical, technological and economic aspects of energy and electricity systems and their associated environmental impacts; (2) current international, Canadian and Ontario energy policy; (3) technological, economic and political factors influencing policy which could significantly reduce environmental impacts of energy use.


Prerequisite: (ENV221H1,ENV222H1) or permission of Academic Associate Director

Forestry


FOR308H1 FDiscovering Wood and its Role in Societal Development

I-AECERRRE, I-AEMINBIO,
I-AEMINBUS, I-AEMINENV
3/-/1/0.50

Humanities and Social Science elective

Trees and their components have been used through the centuries for shelter, heat, entertainment, weapons, sport, furnishings, communication, food and medicines.  This course explores the co-evolution of nature and culture by examining the social and economic impacts that the  forest and its exploitation had in the development of societies throughout the ages.  Focus will be on the cultural history of wood and products derived from it and its influence on developing societies from biblical times to modern day.    The course will examine how wood's versatility and usefulness in varied applications has been discovered by society as needs for survival to austerity develop. The unique properties of woody materials will be examined to expose its ability to meet the varied demands of societies throughout the ages. This course will allow students to explore the place and role of wood derived products in sustainable society.



FOR310H1 SBioenergy from Sustainable Forest Management

IV-AECHEBASC, IV-AEESCBASEJ,
I-AEMINENR
2/-/1/0.50

Socio-economic, technical, political and environmental issues associated with the utilization of forest biomass (e.g., harvesting residues, thinnings, salvage, short rotation woody crops) for a source of renewable energy.


Exclusion: GGR310H1
Recommended Preparation: Completion of at least 6 Science FCEs

FOR421H1 FGreen Urban Infrastructure: Sustainable City Forests

I-AECERRRE, I-AEMINBIO,
I-AEMINENV
2/-/-/0.50

Complementary Studies elective

With over 80% of the world's population now living in cities, tomorrow's forests will be urban. Increasing global recognition of nature deficit disorder and the values of green infrastructure to mitigate broader human impacts gives a new meaning to the term 'urban forestry', coined here at UofT and now recognized widely. Trees in and around the city are key to providing multiple engineered and ecological services that only recently have been brought into the responsible fiscal planning of every municipality around the globe. If managed properly (a key concept), urban forests mitigate climate change and urban heat island effects, act as carbon sinks, air filters, water purifiers, air conditioners, noise dampeners, wildlife and/or biodiversity refuges, and green spaces for the human spirit. Here, we explore the challenges and opportunities of this exciting new applied field at the cross-roads of ecology, engineering and planning to ensure future global sustainability.


Exclusion: FOR416H1

FOR424H1 SInnovation and Manufacturing of Sustainable Materials

I-AECERRRE, IV-AECHEBASC,
IV-AEMECBASC, I-AEMINBIO,
I-AEMINENV, I-AEMINNANO,
IV-AEMMSBASC
2/-/1/0.50

Sustainable materials are a mandate for sustainable  societies. This course will explore the manufacturing, engineering principles and design fundamentals for creating sustainable materials from renewable resources. Special emphasis will be on bioplastics, biofibre, nanobiofibre, biocomposites and nanobiocomposites. Written communication and design skills will be developed through tutorials and assignments.


Exclusion: FOR423H1
Recommended Preparation: Basic knowledge of materials science.

FOR425H1 SBioenergy and Biorefinery Technology

I-AECERRRE, IV-AECHEBASC,
IV-AEESCBASEJ, I-AEMINBIO,
I-AEMINENR
2/-/2/0.50

Technological advances and approaches in deriving biofuels, chemical feedstocks from forest and other biomass resources. Fundamental chemical attributes of biomass, as they affect the fuel value and potential for deriving liquid, solid and gaseous fuels and valuable chemicals for other applications will be explored.


Exclusion: FOR410H1

Geography


GGR216H1 FGlobal Cities

I-AECERGLOB
-/-/-/0.50

Most urban courses taught in the English-speaking world implicitly or explicitly focus on large North American, European, or Australian cities.  While these places are interesting in their own right, studying them as the sole model of urbanization is misleading.  To a great extent, the societies of the westernized, developed world are already highly-urbanized and have been so for decades.  Cities outside of this sphere, by contrast, are generally growing much faster, and experiencing greater social and economic upheaval as a result.  Understanding non-North American urbanization is a vital part of understanding cities in general.  This course is an attempt to introduce students to processes of urbanization that are occurring in places other than North America.   There will be a particular focus on comparing the urban form, economies, and social life in cities around the world.



GGR223H1 SEnvironment, Society and Resources (formerly GGR222H1)

I-AEMINENV
-/-/-/0.50

Focuses on society-environment relations and different approaches to resource governance and management. This includes exploration of the spatial, social, and political economic origins and implications of humans' changing relations to nature. Drawing on debates from environmental governance and political ecology literatures, the course also investigates the ways that different actors and institutions have framed and sought solutions to environmental and resource challenges.


Exclusion: GGR222H1/GGR222Y1/GGR233Y1/JGE221Y1/ENV222Y1/ENV222H1 (if ENV222H1 was taken before 2012-13)

GGR251H1 SGeography of Innovation

I-AEMINBUS
-/-/-/0.50

Explores how new technologies and industries are generated and sustained, or failed to be. Focuses on the dynamics of leading technological sectors such as electronics, automobiles and biotechnology in their geographical and historical contexts. We critically scrutinise the iconic Silicon Valley along with other major innovative regions/nations, and investigate the key role of universities and finance in driving innovation and entrepreneurship.

 

Exclusion: GGR300H1 (2014-15)

GGR252H1 SMarketing Geography

I-AEMINBUS
2/-/1m/0.50

The problem of retail location. The spatial structure of consumer demand and retail facilities. Shopping centres and retail chains. Techniques for site selection and trade area evaluation, location strategies, retail planning.



GGR347H1 FEfficient Use of Energy (formerly JGE347H1)

I-AEMINENR
2/-/1a/0.50

Examines the options available for dramatically reducing our use of primary energy with no reduction in meaningful energy services, through more efficient use of energy at the scale of energy-using devices and of entire energy systems. Topics covered include energy use in buildings, transportation, industry, and agriculture. Offered alternate years from GGR348H1.


Prerequisite: Physics SPH3U
Exclusion: GGR333H1, JGE347H1
Recommended Preparation: 8.0 FCE's including first year Math and/or Physics

GGR348H1 SCarbon-Free Energy (formerly JGE348H1)

I-AEMINENR
2/-/1a/0.50

Examines the options available for providing energy from carbon-free energy sources: solar, wind, biomass, nuclear, and fossil fuels with capture and sequestration of CO2. The hydrogen economy is also discussed. Offered alternate years from GGR347H1.


Prerequisite: Physics SPH3U
Exclusion: GGR333H1, JGE348H1
Recommended Preparation: 8.0 FCE's including first year Math and/or Physics

JGI216H1 SGlobalization and Urban Change

I-AECERGLOB
-/-/-/0.50

Focusing on the impacts that global flows of ideas, culture, people, goods, and capital have on cities throughout the globe, this course explores some of the factors that differentiate the experiences of globalization and urban change in cities at different moments in history and in various geographic locations.


Recommended Preparation: GGR124H1

History and Philosophy of Science

In addition to the courses listed below, the Institute offers the following courses through the Faculty of Arts and Science. These courses are acceptable as Humanities/Social Science Electives in engineering programs: HPS210H1/HPS211H1 Scientific Revolutions, HPS201H1 Origins of Western Technology, HPS202H1  Technology in the Modern World, HPS390/91 History of Mathematics, HPS324H Natural Science and Social Issues.
Details of these courses are available from the IHPST office in Room 316, Old Academic Building, Victoria College 416-978-5397 or www.hps.utoronto.ca. Specific timetable information about Arts and Science courses is published in March, with an updated edition in September.


HPS201H1 FOrigins of Western Technology
2/-/2/0.50

Technology and its place in our culture from Antiquity to the beginnings of the Industrial Revolution. Relations between technology and science, religion, the arts, social institutions, and political beliefs.



HPS202H1 STechnology in the Modern World
2/-/2/0.50

A survey of technical change and its social implications from the Industrial Revolution to the present.


Recommended Preparation: HPS201H1

HPS210H1 FScientific Revolutions I
2/-/1/0.50

Case studies in the history of science from antiquity to 1800, including the revolutionary work of Copernicus, Kepler, Galileo, Descartes, Newton, Linnaeus, Lavoisier, and Herschel. The course is designed to be accessible to science students and non-scientists alike.


Exclusion: HPS200Y1

HPS211H1 SScientific Revolutions II
2/-/1/0.50

Case studies in the history of science from 1800 to 2000, including Volta, Lyell, Darwin, Mendel, Einstein, Schrdinger, Watson, and Crick. The course is designed to be accessible to science students and non-scientists alike


Exclusion: HPS200Y1

HPS280H1 F/SHistory of Science
2/-/1/0.50

Humanities and Social Science elective

This course surveys the development of science from Antiquity to the modern times.  We focus on a number of selected topics, ranging from the mechanical worldview to particle physics, from the classification of species to molecular biology, from the introduction of laboratory to the interaction between war and science.  Our aim is to explore how and why science came to its current form and status by addressing crucial discoveries and conceptual breakthroughs, conditions and standards indispensable to scientific research, and principal mutual influences between science and society.

 



HPS281H1 F/SHistory of Technology and Engineering Pre-Industrial Revolution
2/-/1/0.50

Humanities and Social Science elective

The origins of technology and engineering, from the civilizations of the Ancient World, Greece and Rome, through the Medieval World and the Renaissance. Emphasis on the developments of techniques and machines with an indication of the context in which these occur.  (To be offered in the Winter Session ).



HPS282H1 F/SHistory of Technology and Engineering
2/-/1/0.50

Humanities and Social Science elective

The development of technology and engineering from the Industrial Revolution to the present. An historical overview emphasizing new machines, power sources, materials and processes, as well as communications. Some stress is laid on innovation within historical contexts, the changing relationship between science and technology, and the nature of engineering in history. (HPS281H1 S coordinates with this course, but it is not a pre-requisite.)
 



HPS283H1 SThe Engineer in History

I-AEMINBUS
2/-/1/0.50

Humanities and Social Science elective

The emphasis in this course will be more on the history of engineers as workers, members of professional groups, and managers rather than engineering proper, although obviously engineering cannot be ignored when we talk about engineers’ work.  The aim of the course is to give an understanding of the heritage of engineers as participants in the economy and society.



HPS321H1 SUnderstanding Engineering Practice: From Design to Entrepreneurship

I-AEMINBUS
2m/-/-/0.50

This course seeks to understand the nature of engineering practice, which comprises complex social, intellectual, and technical actions at various stages from design to entrepreneurship.  Building upon the history and social studies of technology, philosophy of engineering, business history, and management science, we introduce ways to analyze such complex actions.


Prerequisite: Three courses with any combination of engineering, natural sciences, medical sciences, or commerce

HPS318H1 FHistory of Medicine I

I-AEMINBIO
-/-/-/0.50

This course explores how medicine was practiced, taught and theorized from ancient Greece to the early modern period. It focuses on the historical development of western medicine in relation to societies, politics and culture, and considers topics such as the creation of medical traditions, the tranmission and communication of medical knowledge, the pluralistic world of healers, the role of religion, magic and natural philosophy, the cultural meaning of disease, and the emergence of institutions such as the hospital.


Exclusion: HPS314Y1

HPS319H1 SHistory of Medicine II

I-AEMINBIO
-/-/-/0.50

This course examines the development of medicine from the seventeenth to the twentieth century. It focuses on the historical development of western medicine in relation to societies, politics and culture and considers topics such as changing views of the body, the development of medical institutions such as hospitals, asylums and laboratories, the diversifies world of healing and the place of visual and material culture in the production and dissemination of medical knowledge.


Exclusion: HPS314Y1; HPS315H1

Human Biology


HMB200H1 SIntroduction to Neuroscience

IV-AEESCBASET
2/-/1/0.50

An introductory course that explores the development, physiology and continually changing function of the nervous system as it relates to certain types of human behaviour. Critical analysis of scientific evidence is used to enrich learning.


Prerequisite: (BIO120H1, BIO130H1), PSY100H1
Exclusion: HMB220H1
Recommended Preparation: PSL300H1

HMB265H1 FGeneral & Human Genetics

I-AEMINBIO
2/-/1/0.50

An introduction to classical and modern methods of genetic analysis. Topics include Mendelian genetics, the genetics of human population and disease, genomics, and applications of genetics to human society.

Please note: requests to waive the pre-requisites or co-requisites for this course are not granted.  Students must either take BIO230H1 or BIO255H1 before enrolling in HMB265H1 or be concurrently enrolled in BIO230H1/BIO255H1 while enrolled in HMB265H1.
If you plan on using transfer credits in lieu of the pre/co-requisites, you must email human.biology@utoronto.ca before enrolling in the course to request that your transfer credits be accepted in lieu of the stated pre-/co- requisites.


Prerequisite: BIO120H1, BIO130H1
Corequisite: BIO230H1/ BIO255H1
Exclusion: BIO260H1/ BIO207H5

Immunology


IMM250H1 F/SThe Immune System and Infectious Disease

I-AEMINBIO
-/-/-/0.50

Students will be introduced to the basic concepts of immunity to infectious disease and how breakdown of the immune response can lead to auto-immunityWe will trace the history of current ideas in immunology and the immune response by examining how bacteria and viruses cause disease and the initial discoveries that led to such developments as vaccination. Current topical and newsworthy infectious diseases (HIV, tuberculosis, SARS, avian flu) will be used as examples of how the immune system copes with microbial infections.


Recommended Preparation: BIO120H1, BIO130H1

Innis College


INI304H1 SCritical Thinking and Inquiry in Written Communication

I-AECERCOM
-/-/-/0.50

This seminar in critical reading, analysis, and writing focuses on the nature, the evaluation, and the use and abuse of evidence in the process of formulating and supporting an argument. The case study method will be employed to assess the level of authority, credibility, and objectivity evident in public discourse, official sources, and academic inquiry.


Prerequisite: Completion of 4.0 full-course equivalents.

INI305H1 SWord and Image in Modern Writing

I-AECERCOM
-/-/-/0.50

The rhetorical term Ekphrasis, which refers to writing that is about visual art, is central in the examination of the persuasive power of the conversation or discourse that is produced when the written word attempts the evocation of visual images. Course readings will include ekphrastic texts drawn from several disciplines and genres: journalism, informal essays, poetry, and scholarly writing. 


Prerequisite: Completion of 4.0 full-course equivalents.

INI310H1 FEditing

I-AECERCOM
-/-/-/0.50

A study of professional editorial conventions, focusing on three stages of the editorial process: substantive editing, stylistic editing, and copy editing. As students learn these stages, they enhance their critical thinking, sharpen their language skills, and practise strategies for strengthening their own writing and the writing of others.


Prerequisite: Completion of 4.0 full-course equivalents.

Joint Courses


JRE300H1 F/SFundamentals of Accounting and Finance

I-AECERBUS, I-AEMINBUS
3/-/1/0.50

Complementary Studies elective

This course introduces a brief overview of essential concepts in accounting and corporate finance. The first part of the course covers the fundamentals of accounting. We start by exploring the basic language of accounting and the fundamental concepts of financial reporting. Students learn to read and analyze basic financial statements including the statements of financial position, comprehensive income, changes in equity, and cash flows. We then introduce key management accounting concepts and explore various methods of costing for decision-making. The second part of the course covers the fundamentals of corporate finance.  In the second half, students will learn how to make financial projections and how to value complex investment opportunities.  Following this, students learn various techniques for controlling risk and how to determine the appropriate cost of capital.  Finally, the course considers issues in cash flow management and overviews project valuation as it relates to corporate mergers.



JRE410H1 F/SMarkets and Competitive Strategy

I-AECERBUS, I-AEMINBUS
2/2/-/0.50

Complementary Studies elective

Introduces the basic concepts, frameworks and methodologies useful to managers in crafting and executing entrepreneurial business strategies in technology-based companies. Students gain an understanding of the external, internal, and dynamic environments of a business and the elements of a superior competitive position. Examine challenges related to industry dynamics, such as industry life cycles, disruptive technologies, and strategic change to enhance competitive advantage; designing and delivering customer value, which involves strategic decisions about segmentation, targeting and positioning, and tactical decisions related to product introductions, marketing communications, distribution channels and pricing. Strategic planning and market analysis with topics on innovations and commercialization: intellectual property protection, platform leadership, basic approaches to business start-up, concluding with discussions on entrepreneurship.



JRE420H1 F/SPeople Management and Organizational Behaviour

I-AECERBUS, I-AEMINBUS
3/1/-/0.50

Complementary Studies elective

This module spans three inter-related topics: leadership, people management and organization behaviour.  It provides students with both the theory and practice in how to design, lead and manage organizations. Topics include theories of leadership, strategy, ethics, designing organizations for rapid change and differing cultural environments, communication, job design, managing and motivating people, fostering creativity, and team work.  In addition to traditional lectures, exercises and case studies will be used throughout.


Mathematics


MAT185H1 SLinear Algebra

I-AEESCBASE
3/-/1/0.50

Topics include:  include: linear systems, matrix algebra, Rn as a vector space, a normed space and an inner-product space, linear transformations on Rn, eigenvalues, applications to circuits, mechanics and an introduction to computer methods.

 


Prerequisite: ESC103H1
Exclusion: MAT188H1

MAT186H1 FCalculus I

I-AECHEBASC, I-AECIVBASC,
I-AECPEBASC, I-AEELEBASC,
I-AEENGBASC, I-AEINDBASC,
I-AELMEBASC, I-AEMECBASC,
I-AEMMSBASC
3/-/1/0.50

Topics include: limits and continuity; differentiation; applications of the derivative – related rates problems, curve sketching, optimization problems, L'Hopital's rule; definite and indefinite integrals; the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus; applications of integration in geometry, mechanics and other engineering problems.


Exclusion: APS162H1

MAT187H1 SCalculus II

I-AECHEBASC, I-AECIVBASC,
I-AECPEBASC, I-AEELEBASC,
I-AEENGBASC, I-AEINDBASC,
I-AELMEBASC, I-AEMECBASC,
I-AEMMSBASC
3/-/1/0.50

Topics include: techniques of integration, an introduction to mathematical modeling with differential equations, infinite sequences and series, Taylor series, parametric and polar curves, vector-valued functions, partial differentiation, and application to mechanics and other engineering problems.

 


Prerequisite: APS162H1/MAT186H1
Exclusion: APS163H1/MAT197H1

MAT188H1 FLinear Algebra

I-AECHEBASC, I-AECIVBASC,
I-AECPEBASC, I-AEELEBASC,
I-AEENGBASC, I-AEINDBASC,
I-AELMEBASC, I-AEMECBASC,
I-AEMMSBASC
3/1/1/0.50

This course covers systems of linear equations and Gaussian elimination, applications; vectors in Rn, independent sets and spanning sets; linear transformations, matrices, inverses; subspaces in Rn, basis and dimension; determinants; eigenvalues and diagonalization; systems of differential equations; dot products and orthogonal sets in Rn; projections and the Gram-Schmidt process; diagonalizing symmetric matrices; least squares approximation.  Includes an introduction to numeric computation in a weekly laboratory.

 



MAT194H1 FCalculus I

I-AEESCBASE
3/-/1/0.50

Topics include: theory and applications of differential and integral calculus, limits, basic theorems and elementary functions.


Exclusion: MAT186H1 or APS162H1

MAT195H1 SCalculus II

I-AEESCBASE
3/-/1/0.50

An introduction to differential equations, techniques of integration, improper integrals, sequences, series, Taylor’s theorem, as well as an introduction to functions of several variables and partial derivatives.

 


Prerequisite: MAT194H1
Exclusion: MAT187H1 or APS163H1

MAT231H1 FModelling with Differential and Difference Equations

II-AEINDBASC
3/-/2/0.50

Ordinary differential equations. Equations of first order and first degree. Linear equations of order n. Equations of second order. Systems of simultaneous equations. Difference equations. Linear control. Forecasting. Business dynamics. Throughout the course: formulating and analysing differential or difference equation models for real-world problems.  



MAT234H1 SDifferential Equations

II-AEMECBASC
3/-/1.50/0.50

Ordinary differential equations. Classification. Equations of first order and first degree. Linear equations of order n. Equations of second order. Bessel’s equation. Legendre’s equation. Series solutions. Systems of simultaneous equations. Partial differential equations. Classification of types. The diffusion equation. Laplace’s equation. The wave equation. Solution by separation of variables.



MAT290H1 FAdvanced Engineering Mathematics

II-AECPEBASC, II-AEELEBASC
3/-/2m/0.50

An introduction to complex variables and ordinary differential equations.  Topics include:  Laplace transforms, ordinary higher-order linear differential equations with constant coefficients; transform methods; complex numbers and the complex plane; complex functions; limits and continuity; derivatives and integrals; analytic functions and the Cauchy-Riemann equations; power series as analytic functions; the logarithmic and exponential functions; Cauchy's integral theorem, Laurent series, residues, Cauchy's integral formula, the Laplace transform as an analytic function.  Examples are drawn from electrical systems.



MAT291H1 FCalculus III

II-AECPEBASC, II-AEELEBASC
3/-/2m/0.50

The chain rule for functions of several variables; the gradient. Multiple integrals; change of variables, Jacobians. Line integrals, independance of path, Green's theorem. The gradient, divergence and curl of a vector field. Surface integrals; parametric representations, applications from electromagnetic fields, Gauss' theorem and Stokes' theorem. Maxima and minima, Lagrange multipliers.



MAT292H1 FOrdinary Differential Equations

II-AEESCBASE
3/-/2/0.50

Existence and uniqueness of solution for first-order differential equations, general second-order linear ODEs, homogeneous equations, nonhomogeneous equations, variable coefficients, variation of parameters ODEs in matrix form, Fourier series, Fourier and Laplace transforms, optimization, single-variable functions, interpretation of problems in mathematical terms, multivariable functions, hessians, optimization in the presence of constraints, Lagrange multipliers, introduction to numerical methods, introduction to numerical and computational methods.


Prerequisite: MAT195H1
Exclusion: CHE222H1, CME261H1, CME362H1, MAT290H1, MAT291H1, MAT294H1 or MAT234H1

MAT294H1 FCalculus and Differential Equations

II-AEMMSBASC
3/-/2/0.50

Partial differentiation, grad, div, curl, multiple integrals, line integrals, surface integrals, differential equations, first order differential equations, homogeneous linear differential equations, boundary conditions.  Formulation of various problems relevant to materials and mining engineering - the concepts above are used.



MAT301H1 F/SGroups and Symmetries

IV-AEESCBASEP, IV-AEESCBASER
3/-/-/0.50

Congruences and fields. Permutations and permutation groups. Linear groups. Abstract groups, homomorphisms, subgroups. Symmetry groups of regular polygons and Platonic solids, wallpaper groups. Group actions, class formula. Cosets, Lagrange theorem. Normal subgroups, quotient groups. Classification of finitely generated abelian groups. Emphasis on examples and calculations.


Prerequisite: MAT224H1/MAT247H1, MAT235Y1/MAT237Y1, MAT246H1/CSC236H1/CSC240H1. (These Prerequisites will be waived for students who have MAT257Y1)
Exclusion: MAT347Y1

MAT336H1 SElements of Analysis

III-AEESCBASEF, IV-AEESCBASEP,
IV-AEESCBASER
3/-/-/0.50

This course provides the foundations of analysis and rigorous calculus for students who will take subsequent courses where these mathematical concepts are central of applications, but who have only taken courses with limited proofs. Topics include topology of Rn, implicit and inverse function theorems and rigorous integration theory.


Prerequisite: MAT223H1/MAT240H1, MAT235Y1/MAT237Y1
Exclusion: MAT257Y1, MAT337H1

MAT363H1 SGeometry of Curves and Surfaces

III-AEESCBASEZ, I-AEMINRAM
3/-/-/0.50

Curves and surfaces in 3-spaces. Frenet formulas. Curvature and geodesics. Gauss map. Minimal surfaces. Gauss-Bonnet theorem for surfaces. Surfaces of constant curvature.


Prerequisite: MAT224H1/MAT247H1, MAT237Y1/MAT257Y1 (MAT257Y1 can be taken concurrently)
Exclusion: MAT367H1

MAT367H1 SDifferential Geometry
-/-/-/0.50

Manifolds, partitions of unity, submersions and immersions, vector fields, vector bundles, tangent and cotangent bundles, foliations and Frobenius’ theorem, multillinear algebra, differential forms, Stokes’ theorem, Poincare-Hopf theorem


Prerequisite: MAT257Y1/(MAT224H1, MAT237Y1,MAT246H1,and permission of instructor)
Recommended Preparation: Multivariable calculus (MAT257Y1), Linear algebra (MAT240H1, MAT247H1)

MAT389H1 FComplex Analysis

III-AEESCBASEA, III-AEESCBASEP,
III-AEESCBASER, III-AEESCBASEZ
3/-/1/0.50

Course examines the following: analytic functions, Cauchy-Reimann equations, contour integration, Cauchy’s theorem, Taylor and Laurent series, singularities, residue calculus, conformal mapping, harmonic functions, Dirichlet and Neumann problems and Poisson integral formulas. Course includes studies of linear differential equations in the complex plane, including Bessel and Legendre functions.


Exclusion: MAT290H1

MAT401H1 FPolynomial Equations and Fields

IV-AEESCBASEP
3/-/-/0.50

Commutative rings; quotient rings. Construction of the rationals. Polynomial algebra. Fields and Galois theory: Field extensions, adjunction of roots of a polynomial. Constructibility, trisection of angles, construction of regular polygons. Galois groups of polynomials, in particular cubics, quartics. Insolvability of quintics by radicals.


Prerequisite: MAT301H1
Exclusion: MAT347Y1

MAT402H1 SClassical Geometries

IV-AEESCBASEP
3/-/-/0.50

Euclidean and non-euclidean plane and space geometries. Real and complex projective space. Models of the hyperbolic plane. Connections with the geometry of surfaces.


Prerequisite: MAT301H1/MAT347Y1, MAT235Y1/MAT237Y1/MAT257Y1

Materials Science and Engineering


MSE101H1 F/SIntroduction to Materials Science

I-AECHEBASC, I-AECIVBASC,
I-AEINDBASC, I-AELMEBASC,
I-AEMECBASC, I-AEMMSBASC
3/1/1/0.50

This is an introductory course in materials science examining the fundamentals of atomic structure, the nature of bonding in materials, crystal structure and defects, and phase equilibria. These basic principles provide the foundation for an exploration of structure-property relationships in metals, ceramics, and polymers, with emphasis on mechanical properties. The properties of materials then form the basis for an introduction to materials selection in design.


Prerequisite: OAC/Grade 12 U Chemistry, Physics, and Calculus

MSE160H1 SMolecules and Materials

I-AEESCBASE
3/-/1/0.50

This course will cover both the fundamentals and applications of molecular chemistry as it relates to the properties of materials. Fundamental topics will include: (1) the design of chemical structures and their relationship to optical and electronic properties; (2) the chemistry and physics of covalent and non-covalent bonding; (3) the relationship of atomic bonding to molecular geometry and local symmetry; (4) crystal structures of extended solids; and (5) extension of these principles to electronic structure, elasticity, and vector and tensor descriptions of materials properties. Applications to diverse areas of engineering will be discussed.


Exclusion: MSE101H1 or APS104H1
Recommended Preparation: CIV102H1

MSE202H1 FThermodynamics I

III-AELMEBASC, II-AEMMSBASC
3/-/2/0.50

The three laws of thermodynamics, Heat capacity theory and Debye’s law. Calculations of enthalpy, entropy, and free energy of pure materials and reactions. Reversible and irreversible processes. Gibbs free energy, chemical equilibria, and phase rule. Introduction of Ellingham, Pourbaix, and pre-dominance area diagrams. Treatment of ideal and non-ideal solutions with the introduction of the concept of activity and activity coefficient. Binary and ternary phase diagrams and their applications to materials processing and materials properties. Thermodynamics of electrochemical systems.



MSE217H1 SDiffusion and Kinetics

II-AEMMSBASC
3/-/2/0.50

Diffusion mechanisms in solids, liquids and gases. Role of crystal imperfections in solids on diffusion rates. Fick’s law, steady state and non-steady state diffusion. Homogeneous and heterogeneous reactions. Orders of reactions. Metastable products and partial equilibrium. Theories on reaction kinetics. Rate limiting step in multi-step processes.



MSE219H1 FStructure and Characterization of Materials

II-AEMMSBASC
3/3/1/0.50

Introduction to two and three-dimensional crystallography and crystal structures of solids. Topics include: Pearson and Hermann-Mauguin symbols, reciprocal space, point group and space group symmetry analysis, stereographic projections. Introduction to tensor analysis of crystalline material properties, and symmetry breakdown by imperfections in crystals. Experimental techniques used to interpret structure and chemistry of solids and their defects will be covered theoretically and in the laboratory including: X-ray diffractometry, optical, electron and scanning probe microscopy, and surface/bulk spectroscopies based on optical, X-ray, electron and ion-beam analysis methods.



MSE335H1 SMaterials Physics

III-AEMMSBASC
3/-/1/0.50

Application of solid state physics to describe properties of materials. Thermal properties of solids: lattice vibrations (phonons), heat capacity, thermal conductivity. Electrical properties of metals: simple circuits, resistivity of metals (classical and quantum descriptions), Seebeck, Peltier, and Thomson effects. Electrical properties of semiconductors: band structure and occupancy, conductivity, Hall effect, simple devices. Electrical properties of insulators: polarization, capacitance, optical properties, ferroelectric and piezoelectric materials. Magnetic properties: diamagnetism and paramagnetism, ferromagnetic and ferrimagnetic materials, magnetic domains, B-H curves.



MSE238H1 SEngineering Statistics and Numerical Methods

II-AEMMSBASC
3/-/2/0.50

This course will teach engineering statistics and numerical methods with MATLAB. Topics on statistics will include probability theory, hypothesis testing, discrete and continuous distribution, analysis of variance, sampling distributions, parameter estimation and regression analysis. The topics on numerical methods will include curve fitting and interpolation, numerical differentiation and integration, solution of ordinary and partial differential equations, initial and boundary value problems, finite difference and finite element methods.

 



MSE244H1 FInorganic Materials Chemistry and Processing

II-AEMMSBASC
3/3/1/0.50

Introduction to atomic and molecular structures, acid-base and redox reactions, transition metal complexes, and detailed chemical properties of the main group elements in the periodic table. Examples of industrial practice in metal processing industry and energy generation/storage technologies. Fundamentals of chemical analysis of inorganic compounds, by both classical “wet” volumetric analysis and instrumental methods.



MSE245H1 SOrganic Materials Chemistry and Properties

II-AEMMSBASC
3/3/1/0.50

Introduction to organic chemistry and organic materials. Naming, bonding and shapes of organic molecules. Properties and reactions of organic compounds. Key mechanisms including electrophilic addition, nucleophilic aliphatic substitution, β-elimination reactions and electrophilic aromatic substitution. Syntheses of polymers (step-growth and radical chain growth polymerization) and processing methods. Structure and properties of polymeric materials (amorphous, crystalline, elastomeric). Thermo-transition and visco-elastic properties of polymers. Life-cycle of polymers, mechanisms of degradation and strategies of polymer recycle. Hands-on organic syntheses and separation experiments.



MSE301H1 SMineral Processing

III-AELMEBASC, III-AEMMSBASC
3/1.50/1/0.50

The theory and practice of mineral beneficiation including particle size measurement, comminution, sizing, liquid-solid separation and ore concentration by gravity, magnetic methods and flotation. The course also includes the relevant aspects of mineralogy, surface chemistry and the movement of solid particles in liquid media.


Prerequisite: MIN225H1 or MSE244H1

MSE316H1 FMechanical Behaviour of Materials

III-AEMMSBASC
3/-/1/0.50

The mechanical behaviour of engineering materials including metals, alloys, ceramics and polymeric materials. The following topics will be discussed: macro- and micro-structural response of materials to external loads; load-displacement and stress-strain relationships, processes and mechanisms of elastic, visco-elastic, plastic and creep deformation, crystallographic aspects of plastic flow, effect of defects on mechanical behaviour, strain hardening theory, strengthening mechanisms and mechanical testing.



MSE318H1 SPhase Transformations

III-AEMMSBASC
3/3/1/0.50

Thermodynamics and phase stability. Free energy diagrams. Phase transformations in unary systems: primary crystallization, amorphization, crystallization of amorphous materials, recrystallization. Phase transformations in binary systems: solidification, precipitation from solid solution, binary invariant reactions. Diffusional transformations, nucleation and growth, diffusionless or martensitic transformations. Second order transformations. Spinodal, massive and order-disorder transformations. Influence of phase transformations on microstructure and properties.



MSE332H1 FHeat and Mass Transfer for Materials Processing

III-AEMMSBASC
3/-/2/0.50
Fundamental concepts of heat and mass transfer as applied in materials engineering. Steady state and transient analysis in slabs, cylinders and spheres through solutions of problems in metallurgy and material processing. Similarity between heat and mass transfer. Concepts of momentum, mass and thermal boundary layers. Coupled problems.

MSE343H1 FBiomaterials

I-AEMINBIO, III-AEMMSBASC
2/-/1/0.50

The course will provide an overview of the applications of materials (metals, polymers, ceramics, composites and modified tissue-based materials) for surgical implant fabrication. The important considerations in selection of materials for fabrication of these devices with an introduction to the biological responses expected with implantation will also be discussed. The concept of biocompatibility will be introduced as well as the essential elements of biology related to an understanding of this criterion for biomaterial selection and implant design. 



MSE351H1 SDesign and Simulation of Materials Processes

III-AEMMSBASC
3/2/1/0.50

Various phenomena involved in materials processing and design will be modeled using a software package based on the finite element method. Examples will include aspects of solid state diffusion, structural stress, heat transfer, fluid flow and chemical reactions. The problems will involve unsteady state as well as 3 dimensional systems. Multi-physics phenomena such as heating of an electric component by an electric current, resulting in a change in physical properties affecting thermal properties will also be introduced. The main objective of this course is to introduce students to the use of a commercial software package to solve fairly common but complex physical and chemical phenomena related to the materials industry.



MSE352H1 SBiomaterials and Biocompatibility

III-AEESCBASET, I-AEMINBIO
3/-/1/0.50

The course presents an introduction to the field of biomaterials, covering also the relevant basics in materials science and biology. Topics include the physical and chemical principles of materials science, structure-property relations, biomaterials processing and degradation. Cell/tissue biomaterials interactions will be discussed as determinants of biocompatibility.


Exclusion: MSE452H1

MSE355H1 SMaterials Production

I-AEMINENR, III-AEMMSBASC
2/-/1/0.50

Materials processing requires the use of raw materials and energy resources. Various materials processing methods are analyzed in terms of efficient use of raw materials and energy. The treatment and discharge of effluent streams in an environmentally sound manner are discussed. An introduction to life cycle analysis is also given.



MSE390H1 FCommunications II

III-AEMMSBASC
1/-/1/0.25

The goals of Communication II are to i) gain in-depth knowledge of a specific area of work within a broader field of Materials Science and Engineering ii) read technical materials that will allow you to advance in the field iii) organize, write and present about the ideas of the field at a level of sophistication and clarity appropriate to university and iv) present clear, well-organized technical presentations.



MSE401H1 FMaterials Selection in Design II

IV-AEMECBASC, IV-AEMMSBASC
2/2/1/0.50

The principles necessary for the selection of engineering materials suitable for a given application from the full range of materials available are developed through a series of case studies. Both the material properties and the capabilities of applicable fabrication processes are considered to identify the material and process which best satisfy the design requirements. Extensive use is made of an integrated materials properties and processes database system.



MSE404H1 FExtractive Metallurgy

I-AEMINENR, I-AEMINENV,
IV-AEMMSBASC
3/-/2/0.50

Technologies and unit operations used in the production of light metals, non-ferrous and ferrous metals will be presented and analyzed. Emphasis will be placed on analyzing overall flow-sheets used by selected companies for the purpose of determining how overall process efficiency can be improved and the environmental impact reduced. Methods and technologies used for metals recycling will also be discussed. Examples will be given from the steel, copper, nickel, zinc, aluminum and magnesium industries. The students will be exposed to a series of actual industrial case studies.

 



MSE408H1 SEnergy Management in Materials Processing

I-AEMINENR, IV-AEMMSBASC
3/-/1/0.50

Basic materials processing flowsheets including primary processing and recycling of metals. Materials and energy balances of individual units and of overall process flowsheets. Use of computer software for flowsheet evaluation. Energy sources, transformations, utilization and requirements. Energy loss, recovery and re-use. Life cycle impact of materials processing on energy consumption and environment. Economic and environmental impacts due to the usage of various energy forms.


Prerequisite: MSE202H1 or equivalent

MSE419H1 FFracture and Failure Analysis

I-AECERFORE, IV-AEMMSBASC
3/-/1/0.50

Fracture mechanisms and mechanics of solid materials. Topics include: nature of brittle and ductile fracture, macro-phenomena and micro-mechanisms of failure of various materials, mechanisms of fatigue; crack nucleation and propagation, Griffith theory, stress field at crack tips, stress intensity factor and fracture toughness, crack opening displacement, energy principle and the J-integral, fracture mechanics in fatigue, da/dN curves and their significance. Practical examples of fatigue analysis and fundamentals of non-destructive testing.



MSE421H1 SSolid State Processing and Surface Treatment

IV-AEMMSBASC
3/-/2/0.50

The fundamentals and technologies of mechanical forming (rolling, forging, extrusion, drawing, sheet-metal forming), sintering and powder forming, thermo-mechanical processing and heat treatment are discussed. Various means to enhance surfaces for the purposes of i) improving corrosion and erosion properties, ii) change mechanical, chemical or electric properties, iii) produce a visually more appealing surface are also covered. Techniques include galvanizing, hot dipping, nitriding, vapour deposition, plasma spraying.

Not offered in 2016-17.



MSE430H1 FElectronic Materials

I-AEMINNANO, IV-AEMMSBASC
2/-/1/0.50

Materials parameters and electronic properties of semiconductors are discussed as basic factors in the engineering of semiconductor devices. Materials parameters are related to preparation and processing methods, and thus to the electronic properties. The implications of materials parameters and properties on selected simple devices are discussed.



MSE431H1 SForensic Engineering

I-AECERFORE, IV-AEMMSBASC
3/-/1/0.50

The course provides participants with an understanding of scientific and engineering investigation methods and tools to assess potential sources, causes and solutions for prevention of failure due to natural accidents, fire, high and low speed impacts, design defects, improper selection of materials, manufacturing defects, improper service conditions, inadequate maintenance and human error. The fundamentals of accident reconstruction principles and procedures for origin and cause investigations are demonstrated through a wide range of real world case studies including: medical devices, sports equipment, electronic devices, vehicular collisions, structural collapse, corrosion failures, weld failures, fire investigations and patent infringements. Compliance with industry norms and standards, product liability, sources of liability, proving liability, defense against liability and other legal issues will be demonstrated with mock courtroom trial proceedings involving invited professionals to elucidate the role of an engineer as an expert witness in civil and criminal court proceedings.


Prerequisite: MSE101H1/APS104H1/MSE260H1 or MSE160H1

MSE432H1 SMacromolecular Materials Engineering

IV-AEMECBASC, I-AEMINNANO,
IV-AEMMSBASC
3/-/-/0.50

This broad overview course begins with an introduction to polymer synthesis, followed by discussion of molecular structure, microstructure and material macrostructure of polymers leading to an understanding of polymer properties and performance.  The important processing operations which are used to convert raw polymers into finished products will be discussed and some quantified.  Brief consideration will be given to product design/material selection issues and the environmental implicaitons of polymers. Several leading edge examples from the electronics, transportation and medical industries are introduced during the course.


Exclusion: CHE461H1 and MSE330H1

MSE435H1 SOptical and Photonic Materials

IV-AEMMSBASC
3/1/2/0.50

Optical and photonic materials play a central role in a variety of application fields including telecommunications, metrology, manufacturing, medical surgery, computing, spectroscopy, holography, chemical synthesis, and robotics - to name a few. The properties of light and its interaction with matter lie at the heart of this ever-expanding list of applications.  The syllabus comprises the nature of light, wave motion, lasers, interference, coherence, fibre optics, diffraction, polarized light, photonic crystals, metamaterials, plasmonic materials, and practical design applications. 



MSE438H1 FIntroduction to Computational Materials Design

IV-AEMMSBASC
3/2/1/0.50

This course will provide a broad overview of the modern computational materials design approaches at various length scales. At the atomic scale, we will cover density functional theory, molecular dynamics, and atomistic kinetic Monte-Carlo. Mesoscale simulations of material behavior will involve dislocation dynamics and phase-field models. At the continuum scale, computational fracture mechanics and plasticity modeling will be covered. Finally, students will be exposed to the concepts and case-studies pertaining to multi-scale modeling. Hands-on training will be provided on software such as LAMMPS and Quantum-ESPRESSO.



MSE440H1 FBiomaterial Processing and Properties

IV-AECHEBASC, I-AEMINBIO,
IV-AEMMSBASC
3/-/1/0.50

Currently used biomaterials for formation of surgical implants and dental restorations include selected metals, polymers, ceramics, and composites. The selection and processing of these materials to satisfy biocompatibility and functional requirements for applications in selected areas will be presented. Materials used for forming scaffolds for tissue engineering, and strategies for repair, regeneration and augmentation of degenerated or traumatized tissues will be reviewed with a focus on biocompatibility issues and required functionality for the intended applications.



MSE442H1 SSurgical and Dental Implant Design

IV-AEESCBASET, IV-AEMECBASC,
I-AEMINBIO, IV-AEMMSBASC
3/-/1/0.50

Case studies will be used to illustrate approaches for selection of biomaterials for fabrication of implants for specific applications in medicine and dentistry. Computational modeling for optimizing device design and the necessary post-design validation procedures for ensuring acceptable device performance will be discussed. Methods of manufacture to produce devices of desired form and with required in vivo characteristics will be reviewed. Design and fabrication of devices designed to be either biodegradable or non-biodegradable will be reviewed. The intent of the course is to illustrate the important considerations in material selection and fabrication methods used for producing implants.

Not offered in 2016-17.


Prerequisite: MSE440H1. For EngSci students, MSE352H1 is recommended.

MSE450H1 FPlant Design for Materials Process Industries

IV-AEMMSBASC
2/-/3/0.50

Analysis of plant design factors involved in the processing of materials. Topics considered include the principles of plant design, optimal allocation of resources and costs, minimizing energy requirements for new plant designs, as well as process innovations for existing plants. A case study approach will be used, employing industrial examples. The course material will be reinforced by a plant tour, visit to an engineering office, and guest lectures by industry experts.



MSE451H1 SAdvanced Physical Properties of Structural Nanomaterials

I-AEMINNANO, IV-AEMMSBASC
3/2/1/0.50

This course deals with the physical properties of bulk nanostructured materials. Included are mechanical properties (elastic behavior, tensile and compressive strength, creep, wear and fatigue properties) electrical properties (electrical transport phenomena, electrical resistivity) magnetic properties (paramagnetic, diamagnetic, soft and hard ferromagnetic, superparamagnetic and antiferromagnetic properties), thermodynamic properties (interfacial enthalpy, thermal stability, phase transformations, heat capacity). The considerable differences observed for nanocrystalline solids compared to conventional polycrystalline and amorphous solids will be discussed in terms of the microstructural differences for these materials.

This course is not offered for 2016-17.



MSE455H1 SProcess Simulation and Computer Design

IV-AEMMSBASC
3/-/2/0.50
Various production processes use simulation software to shorten the route from the initial design to finished product. Simulation software provides the designer and practicing engineer with a powerful tool in the tasks of improving and optimizing the industrial processes. Expensive trials can be avoided and the quality of the finished product secured from the beginning of production. First, this course will cover the basics of the process simulation used in industrial setting. Subsequently, the course will focus on industrial process simulation software used extensively in foundry industry worldwide. Essential elements of CAD/CAM techniques will be covered. Numerical simulation of the filling and solidification in castings will be presented. Calculation of foundry processes with multiple production cycles will be analyzed. Another course feature will be the graphical presentation of the results on the screen. Limited enrolment.

MSE458H1 SNanotechnology in Alternate Energy Systems

IV-AEESCBASEJ, I-AEMINENR,
I-AEMINNANO, IV-AEMMSBASC
3/-/2/0.50

The unique surface properties and the ability to surface engineer nanocrystalline structures renders these materials to be ideal candidates for use in corrosion, catalysis and energy conversion devices. This course deals with the fabrication of materials suitable for use as protective coatings, and their specific exploitation in fields of hydrogen technologies (electrolysis, storage, and fuel cells) linked to renewables. These new devices are poised to have major impacts on power generation utilities, the automotive sector, and society at large. The differences in observed electrochemical behavior between amorphous, nanocrystalline and polycrystalline solid materials will be discussed in terms of their surface structure and surface chemistry. A major team design project along with demonstrative laboratory exercises constitutes a major portion of this course. Limited Enrolment.



MSE459H1 FSynthesis of Nanostructured Materials

I-AEMINNANO, III-AEMMSBASC
3/2/-/0.50

Various synthesis techniques to produce nanostructured materials will be introduced. These include methods involving the vapor phase (physical and chemical vapor deposition, organometallic chemical vapor deposition), the liquid phase (rapid solidification, spark erosion), the solid phase, (mechanical attrition, equal channel deformation) as well techniques producing these structures from solution (electrodeposition, electroless processing, precipitation). Secondary processing techniques to produce final products or devices will also be discussed.



MSE461H1 FEngineered Ceramics

IV-AEMMSBASC
3/-/2/0.50

The unique combinations of physical, electrical, magnetic, and thermomechanical properties exhibited by advanced technical ceramics has led to a wide range of applications including automobile exhaust sensors and fuel cells, high speed cutting tool inserts and ball bearings, thermal barrier coatings for turbine engines, and surgical implants. This course examines the crystal and defect structures which determine the electrical and mass transport behaviours and the effects of microstructure on optical, magnetic, dielectric, and thermomechanical properties. The influence of these structure-property relations on the performance of ceramic materials in specific applications such as sensors, solid oxide fuel cells, magnets, and structural components is explored.

Not offered in 2016-17.



MSE462H1 SMaterials Physics II

I-AEMINNANO
2/-/1/0.50

Electron quantum wave theory of solid-state materials will be introduced. Quantum phenomena in various materials systems, in particular nano materials, will be discussed. Electronic properties of materials such as charge transport, dielectric properties, optical properties, magnetic properties, and thermal properties will be discussed using appropriate quantum theory. Materials systems to be studied may include metals, semiconductors, organics, polymers, and insulators.



MSE488H1 FEntrepreneurship and Business for Engineers

I-AECERBUS, I-AEMINBUS
3/-/2/0.50

A complete introduction to small business formation, management and wealth creation. Topics include: the nature of the Entrepreneur and the Canadian business environment; business idea search and Business Plan construction; Buying a business, franchising, taking over a family business; Market research and sources of data; Marketing strategies promotion, pricing, advertising, electronic channels and costing; The sales process and management, distribution channels and global marketing; Accounting, financing and analysis, sources of funding, and financial controls; The people dimension: management styles, recruiting and hiring, legal issues in employment and Human Resources; Legal forms of organization and business formation, taxation, intellectual property protection; the e-Business world and how businesses participate; Managing the business: location and equipping the business, suppliers and purchasing, credit, ethical dealing; Exiting the business and succession, selling out. A full Business Plan will be developed by each student and the top submissions will be entered into a Business Plan competition with significant cash prizes for the winners. Examples will be drawn from real business situations including practicing entrepreneurs making presentations and class visits during the term. (Identical courses are offered: ECE488H1F, MIE488H1F, CHE488H1S and CIV488H1S.)

*Complementary Studies Elective


Exclusion: APS234 and APS432

MSE490H1 FProfessional Ethics and Practice

IV-AEMMSBASC
2/-/-/0.25

The various roles of a practicing engineer in industry and society will be presented through a series of seminars. The lecturers will include practicing engineers from local companies and consulting firms and representatives from professional and technical societies.



MSE498Y1 YDesign and Research Project

IV-AEMMSBASC
3/6/2/1.00

The students, alone or preferably organized in small groups, select a project involving original research and design work which is normally closely related to the current work of a staff member, and in close collaboration with an external partner (e.g. local industry, hospital, government lab). The students conceive and carry out a research plan under the supervision of the academic staff member usually with an external liaison person as a resource person. The project must contain a significant design component. The project work may be carried out in the department, at the external site, or both locations. The final grade will be based on interim and final written reports, oral presentations at the end of each term and a final poster presentation.


Prerequisite: permission of the Department
Exclusion: CHM499Y1

MSE222H1 SMechanics of Solid Materials

II-AEMMSBASC
3/1.50/1.50/0.50

Principles of stress and strains; Axial loading; Torsion; Shear forces and bending moments; Stresses in Beams; Plane stresses and strains; Pressure vessels; Deflection of beams; Introduction to Finite Element Analysis



MSE298Y1 YCommunications

II-AEMMSBASC
1/-/1/0.50

In the first term, students will advance their knowledge of work-related opportunities in Materials Science Engineering and communicate this knowledge in oral and written forms to their instructors and peers. Students will work in teams of three or four on most assignments. In the second term, students will individually research a self-selected state-of-the-art topic in Materials Science Engineering. Students will write a short report on their research topics and then conclude the term by presenting their research in poster form to their peers and instructors.



MSE302H1 FThermodynamics II

III-AEMMSBASC
3/2/1/0.50

Introduction to statistical thermodynamics. The concept of chemical potential and its application in solution thermodynamics. Solution models. Equilibrium in multi-component, multi-phase systems. Thermodynamics of surfaces and interfaces. Applied thermodynamics with examples of industrial applications. Computational thermodynamics.



MSE398Y1 YMaterials Manufacturing and Design Laboratory

III-AEMMSBASC
1/4/-/0.50

This full year laboratory and design course will give students and overview of the methods and approaches used to process engineering materials from primary production to product design.  The course includes individual laboratory exercises (both experimental and computational) as well as a group design project.  The purpose of the course is to tie together the disparate themes being taught in parallel through third (of thermodynamics, heat and mass transport, phase transformations etc.) into a single vision of how we approach the design of, with, and for materials.


Mechanical and Industrial Engineering


MIE100H1 SDynamics

I-AECPEBASC, I-AEELEBASC,
I-AEENGBASC, I-AEINDBASC,
I-AEMECBASC
3/-/2/0.50

This course on Newtonian mechanics considers the interactions which influence 2-D, curvilinear motion. These interactions are described in terms of the concepts of force, work, momentum and energy. Initially the focus is on the kinematics and kinetics of particles. Then, the kinematics and kinetics of systems of particles and solid bodies are examined. Finally, simple harmonic motion is discussed. The occurrence of dynamic motion in natural systems, such as planetary motion, is emphasized. Applications to engineered systems are also introduced.


Exclusion: APS161H1

MIE191H1 SSeminar Course: Introduction to Mechanical and Industrial Engineering

I-AEINDBASC, I-AEMECBASC
1/-/-/0.15

This is a seminar series that will preview the core fields in Mechanical and Industrial Engineering. Each seminar will be given by a professional in one of the major areas in MIE. The format will vary and may include application examples, challenges, case studies, career opportunities, etc. The purpose of the seminar series is to provide first year students with some understanding of the various options within the Department to enable them to make educated choices for second year. This course will be offered on a credit/no credit basis. Students who receive no credit for this course must re-take it in their 2S session. Students who have not received credit for this course at the end of their 2S session will not be permitted to register in session 3F.



MIE201H1 SEssays in Technology and Culture
2/-/1/0.50

Humanities and Social Science elective

This course explores the relationship between changing technologies and cultural representations and teaches a methodology that bridges the world of the artist and the world of the engineer. It enables engineers to explore how the analysis of art has been used in the discussion of the social impacts of technological innovation and to use these methods as they develop new skills in essayistic argument and increase critical vocabulary.



MIE210H1 SThermodynamics

II-AEMECBASC
3/1.50/1/0.50

This is a basic course in engineering thermodynamics. Topics covered include: properties and behaviour of pure substances; equation of states for ideal and real gases; compressibility factor; first and second laws of thermodynamics; control mass and control volume analyses; applications of first and second laws of thermodynamics to closed systems, open systems and simple thermal cycles.


Prerequisite: MAT186H1

MIE221H1 SManufacturing Engineering

II-AEMECBASC
3/2/1/0.50

Production Fundamentals: Metal casting; metal forming - rolling, forging, extrusion and drawing, and sheet-metal forming; plastic/ceramic/glass forming; metal removal - turning, drilling/ boring/reaming, milling, and grinding; non-traditional machining - ECM, EDM and laser cutting; welding; surface treatment; metrology. Environmental issues in manufacturing processes, recycling of materials. Automation Fundamentals: Automation in material processing and handling - NC, robotics and automatically-guided vehicles; flexible manufacturing - group technology, cellular manufacturing and FMS; and computer-aided design - geometric modelling, computer graphics, concurrent engineering and rapid prototyping. 

Instruction and assessment of communication centered around course deliverables that will form part of an ongoing design portfolio.



MIE222H1 SMechanics of Solids I

II-AEMECBASC
3/1.50/1.50/0.50
Design of mechanical joints. Elasto-plastic torsion of circular sections. Elasto-plastic bending of beams. Residual stresses, shearing stresses in beams, analysis of plane stress and plant strain problems. Pressure vessels, design of members of strength criteria, deflection of beams. Statistically indeterminate problems.

MIE230H1 FEngineering Analysis

II-AEMECBASC
3/-/2/0.50

Introduction to complex analysis. Multivariate integration with application to calculation of volumes, centroids and moments. Vector calculus. Divergence, curl and gradient operators. Green’s theorem. Gauss’ theorem. Stokes’ theorem. Integral transforms. Laplace transforms and Fourier series, integral and transform.


Prerequisite: MAT186H1, MAT187H1

MIE231H1 FProbability and Statistics with Engineering Applications

II-AEMECBASC
3/2/2/0.50

Use of data in engineering decision processes. Elements of probability theory. Discrete and continuous random variables. Standard distributions: binomial, Poisson, hypergeometric, exponential, normal etc. Expectation and variance. Random sampling and parameter estimation. Confidence intervals. Hypothesis testing. Goodness-of-fit tests. Regression and correlation. Statistical Process Control and quality assurance. Engineering applications in manufacturing, instrumentation and process control.



MIE236H1 FProbability

II-AEINDBASC
3/-/2/0.50

Introduction to probability (the role of probability, exploratory data analysis and basic graphical methods). Sample space and events, Venn diagram. Definitions of probability. Axiomatic definition and basic rules. Conditional probability and Bayes' rule. Concept of random variables. Discrete, continuous, and joint distributions. Probability mass functions, density function, cumulative distribution function. Expectation, variance, and covariance. Important discrete and continuous distributions. Multivariate normal distribution. Functions of random variables. Moment Generating functions. Central limit theorem, laws of large numbers, Markov and Chebyshev's inequalities, types of convergence. Fundamental sampling distributions, Chi-square, t, and F distributions. One sample estimation and hypothesis testing.



MIE237H1 SStatistics

II-AEINDBASC
3/1/2/0.50

Two sample estimation and hypothesis testing. Least squares estimation. Simple linear regression and correlation. Multiple linear regression. Linear models. Model building and model assessment. Design and analysis of single and multi factor experiments. Analysis of variance. Randomization and blocking. Fixed and random effects models. Multiple comparisons. Sample size calculations.


Prerequisite: MIE231H1/MIE236H1 or equivalent

MIE240H1 SHuman Centred Systems Design

II-AEINDBASC
3/-/2/0.50

Introduction to principles, methods, and tools for the analysis, design and evaluation of human-centred systems. Consideration of impacts of human physical, physiological, perceptual, and cognitive factors on the design and use of engineered systems. Basic concepts of anthropometrics, work-related hazards, shiftwork, workload, human error and reliability, and human factors standards. The human-centred systems design process, including task analysis, user requirements generation, prototyping, and usability evaluation. Design of work/rest schedules, procedures, displays and controls, and training systems; design for error prevention and human-computer interaction; design for aging populations. 


Prerequisite: MIE242H1 recommended

MIE242H1 FPsychology For Engineers

II-AEINDBASC, I-AEMINBIO
3/3/-/0.50

Introduction to neuroanatomy and processes that are core to perception, cognition, language, decision making, and action. Use of experiments to test hypotheses concerning brain activities and computations. Conducting and reporting experimental research, use of elementary statistics, and satisfaction of research ethics requirements.



MIE243H1 FMechanical Engineering Design

II-AEMECBASC, I-AEMINRAM,
III-AEMMSBASC
3/2/2/0.50

Introduction to basic mechanical parts and mechanisms: gears, cams, bearings, linkages, actuators and motors, chain and belt drives, brakes and clutches, hydraulics and pneumatics. Tutorials on engineering drawing, sketching, and CAD/CAM in SolidWorks: views and drawing types, 2D sketching, 3D modeling and engineering drawing generation, modeling of assembly and motion analysis/animation. Conceptual design examples and mechanical engineering design process, including selection and applications of mechanisms. Dissection and reverse engineering of selected mechanical devices, mechanisms, and subsystems. Competitive group design project including technical report and 3D printing. 

Instruction and assessment of communication centered around course deliverables that will form part of an ongoing design portfolio.



MIE250H1 FFundamentals of Object Oriented Programming

II-AEINDBASC
2/3/-/0.50

Introduction to object-oriented programming using the Java programming language with heavy emphasis on practical application; variable types; console and file input/output; arithmetic; logical expressions; control structures; arrays; modularity; functions; classes and objects; access modifiers; inheritance; polymorphism; design and implementation of programs relevant to industrial engineering needs according to strict specifications.


Prerequisite: APS105H1/APS106H1 or equivalent

MIE253H1 SData Modelling

II-AEINDBASC
3/2/-/0.50

This course provides an understanding of the principles and techniques of information modelling and data management, covering both relational theory and SQL database systems (DBMS), as well as entity-relation conceptual modelling. The course also familiarizes the student with analytical applications (OLAP) and provides an introduction to XML data modelling. The laboratory focuses on database application development using SQL DBMS, OLAP queries and entity-relation data modelling.


Prerequisite: MIE250H1

MIE258H1 FEngineering Economics and Accounting

I-AECERBUS, I-AECERENTR,
II-AEINDBASC, III-AEMECBASC,
I-AEMINBUS, III-AEMMSBASC
3/-/1/0.50

Engineering economic and accounting concepts needed in the design of engineering systems: time value of money, evaluation of cash flows, cost and managerial accounting concepts, defining alternatives, acceptance criteria, replacement analysis, depreciation and income tax, sensitivity and decision analysis, buy or lease, make or buy, production functions and relationship to cost functions. Introduction to financial engineering: fixed income securities, optimal portfolios, mean-variance optimization, portfolio theory, capital asset pricing model (CAPM) and derivatives (options, basic properties, risk management).


Prerequisite: MIE231H1 / MIE236H1 or equivalent
Exclusion: ECE472H1

MIE262H1 SOperations Research I: Deterministic OR

II-AEINDBASC
3/2/1/0.50

Introduction to deterministic operations research. Formulations of mathematical models to improve decision making; linear and integer programming; the simplex method; the revised simplex method; branch-and-bound methods; sensitivity analysis; duality; network models; network simplex method; Dijkstra's algorithm; basic graph theory; and deterministic dynamic programming. 


Prerequisite: MAT186H1, MAT188H1

MIE263H1 SOperations Research II: Stochastic OR

II-AEINDBASC
3/-/2/0.50

Modeling and analysis of systems subject to uncertainty using probabilistic methods.  Introduction to decision analysis.  Derivation and application of Bernoulli and Poisson processes, Markov chains, and queuing models.  Stochastic optimization and extensions.   Applications to engineering, games of chance, health care, and management.


Prerequisite: MIE231H1 or MIE236H1

MIE270H1 FMaterials Science

II-AEMECBASC
3/0.75/1.50/0.50

Electrical, thermal, magnetic, optical properties of materials; Corrosion and degradation of materials; Phase transformation and strengthening mechanisms; Failure analysis and testing; Fatigue, creep, impact; Composite materials, special purpose materials.



MIE301H1 FKinematics and Dynamics of Machines

III-AEMECBASC, I-AEMINRAM
3/3/2/0.50

Classifications of mechanisms, velocity, acceleration and force analysis, graphical and computer-oriented methods, balancing, flywheels, gears, geartrains, cams. Introduction to Lagrangian Dynamics: Lagrange’s equations of motion, Hamilton’s equations, Hamilton’s principle. 

Instruction and assessment of communication centered around course deliverables that will form part of an ongoing design portfolio.


Prerequisite: MIE100H1

MIE303H1 FMechanical and Thermal Energy Conversion Processes

III-AEESCBASEJ, III-AEMMSBASC
3/1.50/1/0.50

Engineering applications of thermodynamics in the analysis and design of heat engines and other thermal energy conversion processes within an environmental framework; Steam power plants, gas cycles in internal combustion engines, gas turbines and jet engines. Fossil fuel combustion, Alternative fuel combustions, fusion processes and introduction to advanced systems of fuel cells.



MIE312H1 FFluid Mechanics I

III-AEMECBASC
3/1/1/0.50

Fluid statics, pressure measurement, forces on surfaces. Kinematics of flow, velocity field, streamlines. Conservation of mass. Fluid dynamics, momentum analysis, Euler and Bernoulli equations. Energy and head lines. Laminar flow. Flow at high Reynolds numbers, turbulence, the Moody diagram. External flows. Boundary layers. Lift and drag. Flow separation.


Prerequisite: MIE100H1, MAT234H1, MIE210H1

MIE313H1 SHeat and Mass Transfer

III-AEMECBASC, I-AEMINENR
3/1.50/2/0.50

Exact and numerical analysis of steady and transient conduction in solids. Solutions of one-dimensional and multidimensional systems. Principles of convection and solutions under laminar and turbulent flow over flat plates and inside and over pipes. Free convection. Thermal radiation between multiple black and grey surfaces. Analysis of open-ended design problems for improving thermal transport in commercial products.


Prerequisite: MAT234H1, MIE210H1, MIE230H1, MIE312H1 or equivalent

MIE315H1 SDesign for the Environment

IV-AEESCBASEJ, III-AEMECBASC,
I-AEMINENV
3/-/1/0.50

Life Cycle Assessment for the measurement of environmental impacts of existing products and processes. Design for Environment principles for the reduction of environmental impacts in new product and process designs. Functional, economic, and societal analysis taught for use in a major team-written project to compare and contrast two product or process alternatives for a client. 

Instruction and assessment of communication centered around course deliverables that will form part of an ongoing design portfolio.



MIE320H1 SMechanics of Solids II

III-AEMECBASC, III-AEMMSBASC
3/1.50/2/0.50

Three-dimensional stress transformation, strain energy, energy methods, finite element method, asymmetric and curved beams, superposition of beam solutions, beams on elastic foundations, buckling, fracture mechanics, yield criteria, stress concentration, plane stress and strain.


Prerequisite: MIE222H1

MIE331H1 SPhysiological Control Systems

IV-AECHEBASC, IV-AECIVBASC,
III,IV-AECPEBASC, III,IV-AEELEBASC,
III-AEMECBASC, I-AEMINBIO,
III-AEMINBME, I-AEMINRAM,
III-AEMMSBASC
3/1/1/0.50

The purpose of this course is to provide undergraduate engineering students with an introduction to physiological concepts and selected physiological control systems present in the human body. Due to the scope and complexity of this field, this course will not cover all physiological control systems but rather a selected few such as the neuromuscular, cardiovascular, and endocrine control systems. This course will also provide an introduction to the structures and mechanisms responsible for the proper functioning of these systems. This course will combine linear control theory, physiology, and neuroscience with the objective of explaining how these complex systems operate in a healthy human body. The first part of the course will provide an introduction into physiology and give an overview of the main physiological systems. The second part of the course will focus on the endocrine system and its subsystems, including glucose regulation, thyroid metabolic hormones, and the menstrual cycle. The third part of the course will include discussion on the cardiovascular system and related aspects such as cardiac output, venous return, control of blood flow by the tissues, and nervous regulation of circulation. The fourth and final section of the course will focus on the central nervous system, the musculoskeletal system, proprioception, kinaesthetic, and control of voluntary motion.


Prerequisite: CHE353H1

MIE334H1 SNumerical Methods I

III-AEMECBASC
3/-/1.50/0.50

This introductory course to numerical methods includes the following topics: polynomial interpolation, numerical integration, solution of linear systems of equations, least squares fitting, solution of nonlinear equations, numerical differentiation, solution of ordinary differential equations, and solution of partial differential equations. Tutorial assignments using MATLAB will focus on engineering applications relevant to the background of students taking the course.



MIE335H1 SAlgorithms & Numerical Methods

III-AEINDBASC
3/1/1/0.50

Algorithmic analysis, big-O asymptotic analysis; numerical linear algebra, solution techniques for linear and non-linear systems of equations; matrix factorization, LU and Cholesky factorization, factorization in the revised simplex method; Newton’s method, Gale-Shapley method, greedy methods for combinatorial optimization, branch-and-bound search methods; graph theory and graph theoretic algorithms; design and implementation of algorithms to optimize mathematical models.


Prerequisite: MIE262H1

MIE342H1 FCircuits with Applications to Mechanical Engineering Systems

III-AEMECBASC
3/1.50/1/0.50

This course presents analysis of complex circuits and application of circuit principles to design circuits for mechanical engineering systems. Discussions will centre around circuits and instrumentation. In-depth discussions will be given on a number of topics: (1) Mechatronics design applications of circuit principles; (2) Network theorems, node-voltage, mesh-current method, Thévenin equivalents; (3) Operational amplifier circuits; (4) 1st and 2nd order circuits; (5) Laplace transform, frequency response; (6) Passive and active filter design (low- and high-pass filters, bandpass and bandreject filters); (7) Interface/readout circuits for mechanical engineering systems, sensors, instrumentation; (8) Inductance, transformers, DC/AC machines; (9) Digital circuit and data sampling
introduction.


Prerequisite: MAT186H1 and MAT187H1
Recommended Preparation: ECE110H1 or ECE159H1

MIE343H1 FIndustrial Ergonomics and the Workplace

III-AEINDBASC, IV-AEMECBASC,
I-AEMINBIO
3/3/-/0.50

The Biology of Work: anatomical and physiological factors underlying the design of equipment and work places. Biomechanical factors governing physical workload and motor performance. Circadian rhythms and shift work. Measurement and specification of heat, light, and sound with respect to design of the work environment.


Prerequisite: MIE231H1/MIE236H1 or equivalent

MIE344H1 FErgonomic Design of Information Systems

III-AEINDBASC
3/3/-/0.50

The goal of this course is to provide an understanding of how humans and machines can be integrated with information systems. The focus will be on the design of human-machine interfaces, and on the analysis of the impact of computers on people. The course will also include coverage of usability engineering and rapid prototyping design, analysis of user mental models and their compatibility with design models, and quantitative modelling of human-computer interaction.


Prerequisite: MIE240H1 or permission of the instructor

MIE345H1 SCase Studies in Human Factors and Ergonomics

III-AEINDBASC
3/-/2/0.50

A detailed analysis will be made of several cases in which human factors methods have been applied to improve the efficiency with which human-machine systems operate. Examples will be chosen both from the area of basic ergonomics and from high technology. Emphasis will be placed on the practical use of material learned in earlier human factors courses.


Prerequisite: MIE240H1

MIE346H1 SAnalog and Digital Electronics for Mechatronics

III-AEMECBASC, I-AEMINRAM
3/1.50/1/0.50

A study of the fundamental behaviour of the major semiconductor devices (diodes, bipolar junction transistors and field effect transistors). Development of analysis and design methods for basic analog and digital electronic circuits and devices using analytical, computer and laboratory tools. Application of electronic circuits to instrumentation and mechatronic systems.


Prerequisite: MIE230H1, MAT234H1, MIE342H1

MIE350H1 FDesign and Analysis of Information Systems

III-AEINDBASC
3/1/1/0.50

Provides students with an understanding of the mothods of information system analysis and design. These include methods for determining and documenting an organization's structure (FDD), activities, behaviours and information flows (DFDs, decision tables and trees, network diagrams, etc); model acquisition (data repositories), verification and validation. Methods such as SADT, RAD and prototyping will be covered. Students will acquire a working knowledge of various frameworks for analysis (e.g., information technology categories, system and application classifications, decision types, data vs information). Throughout the course, emphasis is placed on the importance of systems thinking and organizational culture in the analysis and design process. In the laboratory, students will use a CASE-based computer program (Visible Analyst) for the analysis and design of information systems for selected organizations. Students will be asked to work in teams to create a web-based information site  and to document and present their development progress through the use of a structured project log.


Prerequisite: MIE253H1

MIE354H1 FBusiness Process Engineering

III-AEINDBASC, I-AEMINBUS
3/2/-/0.50

This course focuses on understanding multiple perspectives for grouping, assessing, designing and implementing appropriately integrated and distributed information systems to support enterprise objectives. The emphasis is on understanding how Business Process Management techniques and tools can contribute to align an organization’s business and information technology perspectives, as well as the characteristics of application and system types and the implications for their design, operation and support of information needs, including those associated with different platforms and technology infrastructure e.g., legacy systems, client/server, the Internet and World Wide Web including the emergence of a web-service-based service oriented architecture. Students will work in the laboratory to develop business processes that can be specified and executed by information systems supporting BPEL, a widely supported standard for describing web-service-based business process.


Prerequisite: MIE253H1 or permission of the instructor

MIE358H1 FEngineering Economics and Accounting

I-AECERBUS, I-AECERENTR
3/-/1/0.50

Engineering economic and accounting concepts needed in the design of engineering systems: time value of money, evaluation of cash flows, cost and managerial accounting concepts, defining alternatives, acceptance criteria, replacement analysis, depreciation and income tax, sensitivity and decision analysis, buy or lease, make or buy, production functions and relationship to cost functions. Introduction to financial engineering: fixed income securities, optimal portfolios, mean-variance optimization, portfolio theory, capital asset pricing model (CAPM) and derivatives (options, basic properties, risk management).


Prerequisite: MIE231H1 / MIE236H1 or equivalent
Exclusion: ECE472H1

MIE360H1 FSystems Modelling and Simulation

IV-AEESCBASEF, III-AEINDBASC,
IV-AEMECBASC
3/2/1/0.50

Principles for developing, testing and using discrete event simulation models for system performance improvement.  Simulation languages, generating random variables, verifying and validating simulation models. Statistical methods for analyzing simulation model outputs, and comparing alternative system designs.  Fitting input distributions, including goodness of fit tests. Role of optimization in simulation studies.


Prerequisite: MIE231H1/MIE236H1 or equivalent

MIE363H1 SResource and Production Modelling

III-AEINDBASC
3/-/2/0.50

This course focuses on features of production/service systems and methods of modelling their operation; the material flow, information flow and control systems. Topics include demand forecasting, inventory management, supply chain management, capacity planning, and lot size planning. Emphasis will be placed on the modelling aspects of operations management, as well as the application of analytical methods in the design of production/service systems. Students will be asked to address open-ended design problems in various activities of the course.


Prerequisite: MIE231H1 / MIE236H1, and MIE262H1 or equivalent

MIE364H1 SQuality Control and Improvement

I-AECERFORE, III-AEINDBASC,
III-AEMMSBASC
3/1/2/0.50

In manufacturing and service industries alike, quality is viewed as an important strategic tool for increasing competitiveness. Continuous quality improvement is a key factor leading to a company’s success. With more emphasis on quality, the cost and the product cycle time are reduced and the communication between producer and customer is improved. The course focuses on the following topics: introduction to quality engineering, TQM, quality standards, supplier-producer relations and quality certification, costs of quality, statistical process control for long and short production runs, process capability analysis and acceptance sampling, quality certification, six sigma quality, quality improvement using designed experiments and an overview of the Taguchi Methods.


Prerequisite: MIE236H1 or equivalent

MIE365H1 FOperations Research III: Advanced OR

IV-AEESCBASEF, III-AEINDBASC
3/2/1/0.50

Design of operations research models to solve a variety of open-ended problems. Linear programming extensions are presented: goal programming, column generation, Dantzig-Wolfe decomposition, and interior point solution methods.  Non-linear programming solution methods are developed: optimality conditions, quadratic programming and bi-level programming. Solutions to advanced stochastic models: stochastic programming, 2-person and n-person game theory, and Markov Decision Processes.


Prerequisite: MIE262H1, MIE263H1

MIE367H1 SCases in Operations Research

IV-AEESCBASEF, III-AEINDBASC
3/-/2/0.50

This course focuses on the integration of the results from earlier operations research courses and an assessment of the different methods with regard to typical applications. The course is taught using the case method. Students are expected to analyze cases based on real applications on their own, in small groups and during lecture sessions, and solve them using commercial software packages.


Prerequisite: MIE263H1

MIE375H1 FFinancial Engineering

III-AEESCBASEF
3/-/1/0.50

This course provides a background in the fundamental areas in financial engineering including relevant concepts from financial economics. Major topics include interest rate theory, fixed income securities, bond portfolio construction term structure of interest rates, mean-variance optimization theory, the Capital Asset Pricing Model (CAPM), arbitrage pricing theory (APT), forwards and futures, and introduction to option pricing and structured finance.



MIE376H1 SMathematical Programming (Optimization)

III-AEESCBASEF
3/2/1/0.50

This course deals with the formulation of optimization models for the design and operation of systems that produce goods and services, and the solution of such problems with mathematical programming methods, including linear programming: the simplex method, sensitivity analysis, duality, the revised simplex, column generation, Dantzig-Wolfe decomposition and linear programming with recourse; minimum cost network flows; dynamic programming; integer programming; non-linear programming models.



MIE377H1 SFinancial Optimization Models

III-AEESCBASEF
3/1/1/0.50

This course deals with the formulation of optimization models for the design and selection of an optimal investment portfolio. Topics include Risk Management, Mean Variance Analysis, Models for Fixed Income, Scenario Optimization, Dynamic Portfolio Optimization with Stochastic Programming, Index Funds, Designing Financial Products, and Scenario Generation. These concepts are also applied to International Asset Allocation, Corporate Bond Portfolios and Insurance Policies with Guarantees.



MIE402H1 SVibrations

IV-AEMECBASC
3/1/2/0.50

Fundamental concepts of vibration of mechanical systems. Free vibration single degree of freedom systems. Various types of damping. Forced vibrations. Vibration measuring instruments. Steady state and transient vibrations. Vibration of multi-degree of freedom systems. Vibration isolation. Modal analysis. Lagrange equations and Hamilton’s principle. Vibration of continuous systems. Special topics.


Prerequisite: MAT186H1, MAT187H1, MAT188H1, MIE100H1, MIE222H1

MIE404H1 FControl Systems I

IV-AEMECBASC
3/3/2/0.50

Analysis of stability, transient and steady state characteristics of dynamic systems.  Characteristics of linear feedback systems.  Design of control laws using the root locus method, frequency response methods and state space methods.  Digital control systems.  Application examples.



MIE407H1 FNuclear Reactor Theory and Design

I-AECERNUC, IV-AEESCBASEJ,
IV-AEMECBASC, I-AEMINENR
3/-/2/0.50

This course covers the basic principles of the neutronic design and analysis of nuclear fission reactors with a focus on Generation IV nuclear systems. Topics include radioactivity, neutron interactions with matter, neutron diffusion and moderation, the fission chain reaction, the critical reactor equation, reactivity effects and reactor kinetics. Multigroup neutron diffusion calculations are demonstrated using fast-spectrum reactor designs.


Prerequisite: MIE230H1 or equivalent
Recommended Preparation: CHE566H1

MIE408H1 S* Thermal and Machine Design of Nuclear Power Reactors

I-AECERNUC, IV-AEESCBASEJ,
IV-AEMECBASC, I-AEMINENR
3/-/2/0.50

This course covers the basic principles of the thermo-mechanical design and analysis of nuclear power reactors. Topics include reactor heat generation and removal, nuclear materials, diffusion of heat in fuel elements, thermal and mechanical stresses in fuel and reactor components, single-phase and two-phase fluid mechanics and heat transport in nuclear reactors, and core thermo-mechanical design.


Prerequisite: MIE407H1/MIE222H1, MIE312H1, MIE313H1 or equivalents
Recommended Preparation: CHE566H1

MIE311H1 SThermal Energy Conversion

III-AEMECBASC, I-AEMINENR
3/3/-/0.50

Engineering applications of thermodynamics in the analysis and design of heat engines and other thermal energy conversion processes within an environmental framework. Steam power plants, gas cycles in internal combustion engines, gas turbines and jet engines. Refrigeration, psychrometry and air conditioning. Fossil fuel combustion and advanced systems includes fuel cells.


Prerequisite: MIE210H1, MIE313H1

MIE414H1 F* Applied Fluid Mechanics

IV-AEMECBASC
3/3/1/0.50

This course builds upon the material introduced in Fluid Mechanics I and connects it to a wide range of modern technical applications of fluid flow. Applications include the design of pipe and microfluidic networks, transient flow phenomena, compressible flow and shocks, characteristics of pumps, open channel flow and an overview of flow measurement techniques. Lectures are complemented by laboratory experiments on topics such as centrifugal pumps, flow transients and fluid flow in microfluidic chips.


Prerequisite: MIE312H1

MIE422H1 FAutomated Manufacturing

III-AEESCBASEZ, IV-AEMECBASC
2/3/-/0.50

Introduction to Computer Integrated Manufactuing. Definitions, terminology. Organization of manufacturing systems. Introduction to NC machines. Introduction to robotics. Types of robot motion. Robot kinematics. Jacobians, singularities. Robot motion trajectories. Interpolation, spline fits. Robot joint control. Flexible manufacturing systems, justification. Robot cell design. Group technology. Design of group technology cell. Programmable logic controllers. Limited enrolment.


Prerequisite: MIE221H1 or equivalent

MIE433H1 SWaves and their applications in Non-Destructive Testing and Imaging

IV-AEMECBASC
3/-/-/0.50

The course is designed for students who are interested in more advanced studies of applying wave principles to engineering applications in the field of non-destructive testing (NDT) and imaging (NDI). Topics will cover: Review of principles and characteristics of sound and ultrasonic waves; thermal waves; optical (light) waves; photons: light waves behaving as particles; black body radiation, continuous wave and pulsed lasers.  The course will focus on NDT and NDI applications in component inspection and medical diagnostics using ultrasonics, laser photothermal radiometry, thermography and dynamic infrared imaging.



MIE438H1 SMicroprocessors and Embedded Microcontrollers

III-AEESCBASEZ, IV-AEMECBASC,
I-AEMINRAM
2/3/-/0.50

Review (number systems, CPU architecture, instruction sets and subroutines); Interfacing Memory; Interfacing Techniques; Transistors and TTL/CMOS Logic; Mechanical Switches & LED Displays; Interfacing Analog, A/D & D/A Conversions; Stepper Motors & DC Motors; RISC Technology and Embedded Processors; DAS Systems; Embedded Microcontroller System Design; CPU-based Control.


Exclusion: ECE243H1, ECE352H1

MIE439H1 SBiomechanics I

IV-AEESCBASET, III-AEESCBASEZ,
IV-AEMECBASC, I-AEMINBIO,
III-AEMINBME
3/2/-/0.50

Introduction to the application of the principles of mechanical engineering - principally solid mechanics, fluid mechanics, and dynamics - to living systems. Topics include cellular mechanics, blood rheology, circulatory mechanics, respiratory mechanics, skeletal mechanics, and locomotion. Applications of these topics to biomimetic and biomechanical design are emphasized through a major, integrative group project.



MIE440H1 F* Design of Innovative Products

IV-AEESCBASET, IV-AEINDBASC,
IV-AEMECBASC
2/2/1/0.50

Recently developed methods applied at different stages of the design process include: Identification of unmet/underserved user needs through a modified definition of lead users (those who experience needs in advance of the mainstream population) including identifying/studying lead users, identifying which lead-user needs are relevant to the general population; Roles of function and affordance in successful products; Obstacles of fixation and cognitive bias to creativity; Concept generation methods including TRIZ/TIPS (Theory of Inventive Problem Solving, use of unrelated stimuli and analogy (e.g., from biology); Configuration design methods including design for transformation, design for assembly and end-of-life, e.g., reuse, repair and recycling. Hands-on experience of these topics in lectures, tutorials, and labs support successful application of the methods for the course project, as well as future design activities.



MIE441H1 S* Design Optimization

IV-AEMECBASC
3/2/-/0.50

Problem definition and formulation for optimization, optimization models, and selected algorithms in optimization.  Design for Tolerancing, Design for Manufcaturing, and Design for Assembly.  State of the are Computer Aided Design packages are introduced with case studies.  Emphasis is placed on gaining practical skills by solving realistic design problems.


Prerequisite: MIE341H1, MIE222H1 or equivalents

MIE442H1 FMachine Design

I-AECERFORE, IV-AEESCBASEJ,
IV-AEMECBASC, I-AEMINRAM
3/1.50/3/0.50

Introduction to the fundamental elements of mechanical design including the selection of engineering materials, load determination and failure analysis under static, impact, vibration and cyclic loads. Surface failure and fatigue under contact loads, lubrication and wear.  Consideration is given to the characteristics and selection of machine elements such as bearings, shafts, power screws and couplings.


Prerequisite: MIE320H1

MIE443H1 S* Mechatronics Systems: Design and Integration

IV-AEESCBASEZ, IV-AEMECBASC,
I-AEMINRAM
2/5/-/0.50

The course aims to raise practical design awareness, provide pertinent project engineering methodology, and generate a know-how core in integration of complex automation. This course has mainly practical content, and is integral and useful in the training and education of those students who plan to be employed in areas related to intelligent automation, as well as to the breadth of knowledge of all others. Although emphasis will be on robotic-based automation (mechatronics), the learning will be useful in all domains of system integration. This course will introduce students to the basics of integration, methodology of design, tools, and team project work. The course will be monitored based on projects from a selected list of topics. The lectures will be in format of tutorials as preparation and discussions on project related issues. A main goal is to bring the methods, means and spirit of the industrial design world to the class room. Emphasis will be on understanding the elements of integration, methodology and approaches, and will involve numerous case studies. Specifically the course will provide a practical step-by-step approach to integration: specifications, conceptual design, analysis, modeling, synthesis, simulation and bread-boarding, prototyping, integration, verification, installation and testing. Issues of project management, market, and economics will be addressed as well. Limited Enrolment.


Prerequisite: MIE346H1

MIE444H1 F* Mechatronics Principles

III-AEESCBASEZ, IV-AEMECBASC,
I-AEMINRAM
2/3/-/0.50

This course provides students with the tools to design, model, analyze and control mechatronic systems (e.g. smart systems comprising electronic, mechanical, fluid and thermal components). This is done through the synergic combination of tools from mechanical and electrical engineering, computer science and information technology to design systems with built-in intelligence. The class provides techniques for the modeling of various system components into a unified approach and tools for the simulation of the performance of these systems. The class also presents the procedures and an analysis of the various components needed to design and control a mechatronic system including sensing, actuating, and I/O interfacing components.


Prerequisite: MIE342H1, MIE346H1

MIE451H1 FDecision Support Systems

IV-AEINDBASC
3/1/1/0.50

This course provides students with an understanding of the role of a decision support system in an organization, its components, and the theories and techniques used to construct them. The course will cover basic technologies for information analysis, knowledge-based problem solving methods such as heuristic search, automated deduction, constraint satisfaction, and natural language understanding.


Prerequisite: MIE253H1, MIE350H1

MIE457H1 SKnowledge Modelling and Management

IV-AEESCBASEF, IV-AEINDBASC
3/1/1/0.50

This course explores both the modelling of knowledge and its management within and among organizations. Knowledge modelling will focus on knowledge types and their semantic representation. It will review emerging representations for knowledge on the World Wide Web (e.g., schemas, RDF). Knowledge management will explore the acquisition, indexing, distribution and evolution of knowledge within and among organizations. Emerging Knowledge Management System software will be used in the laboratory.


Prerequisite: MIE253H1, MIE350H1

MIE459H1 SOrganization Design

IV-AEINDBASC
4/-/-/0.50

Study of work systems design in new and existing organizations. Consideration will be given to sociotechnical systems design methodology, division of labour, change management, teams, incentives, project management, safety culture, automation, equity and union-management relations.


Prerequisite: APS111/112 or Praxis, MIE258 or an equivalent engineering economics course

MIE463H1 FIntegrated System Design

IV-AEINDBASC
3/-/2/0.50

Integrated System Design is a capstone course that integrates the various perspectives of an integrated system taught in third year, including: Optimization, Quality, Management, Information, and Economics. The course approaches systems design from a Business Process perspective. Beginning with the Business Processes, it explores the concept of Business Process Re-engineering. It extends the concept of business processes to incorporate perspectives such as cost, quality, time, behaviour, etc. The second part of the course focuses on business process design tools. Namely, software tools to both design, simulate and analyse business processes. The third part of the course explores the application of process design to various domains. Guest speakers are used to provide domain background.


Prerequisite: Fourth-year, Industrial Engineering standing

MIE465H1 SAnalytics in Action

IV-AEESCBASEF, III-AEINDBASC
3/2/-/0.50

This course showcases the impact of analytics focusing on real world examples and case studies.  Particular focus on decision analytics, where data and models are combined to ultimately improve decision-making.  Methods include: linear and logistic regression, classification and regression trees, clustering, linear and integer optimization. Application areas include: healthcare, business, sports, manufacturing, finance, transportation, public sector.



MIE469H1 SReliability and Maintainability Engineering

I-AECERFORE, IV-AEESCBASEF,
III-AEINDBASC, IV-AEMECBASC
3/-/2/0.50

An introduction to the life-cycle costing concept for equipment acquisition, operation, and replacement decision-making. Designing for reliability and determination of optimal maintenance and replacement policies for both capital equipment and components. Topics include: identification of an items failure distribution and reliability function, reliability of series, parallel, and redundant systems design configurations, time-to-repair and maintainability function, age and block replacement policies for components, the economic life model for capital equipment, provisioning of spare parts.


Prerequisite: MIE231H1 / MIE236H1 or equivalent, MIE258H1

MIE479H1 FEngineering Mathematics, Statistics and Finance Capstone Design

IV-AEESCBASEF
-/-/5/0.50

This will be a group project oriented course that focuses on the development of tools for solving a practical financial engineering problem.  In particular, a decision support system will be developed that integrates both the mathematical and statistical modeling techniques learned in the option along with relevant computing technologies.  Problems that contain a real-time economic decision making component will be emphasized, but does not necessarily or explicitly involve financial markets.  An important goal of the capstone is the articulation of the requirements to non-specialists as an exercise in communication with non-technical members of an organization.



MIE488H1 FEntrepreneurship and Business for Engineers

I-AECERBUS, I-AEMINBUS
3/-/2/0.50

A complete introduction to small business formation, management and wealth creation. Topics include: the nature of the Entrepreneur and the Canadian business environment; business idea search and Business Plan construction; Buying a business, franchising, taking over a family business; Market research and sources of data; Marketing strategies promotion, pricing, advertising, electronic channels and costing; The sales process and management, distribution channels and global marketing; Accounting, financing and analysis, sources of funding, and financial controls; The people dimension: management styles, recruiting and hiring, legal issues in employment and Human Resources; Legal forms of organization and business formation, taxation, intellectual property protection; the e-Business world and how businesses participate; Managing the business: location and equipping the business, suppliers and purchasing, credit, ethical dealing; Exiting the business and succession, selling out. A full Business Plan will be developed by each student and the top submissions will be entered into a Business Plan competition with significant cash prices for the winners. Examples will be drawn from real business situations including practicing entrepreneurs making presentations and class visits during the term. (Identical courses are offered: ECE488H1F, MSE488H1F, CHE488H1S and CIV488H1S.)

*Complementary Studies Elective


Exclusion: APS234 and APS432

MIE490Y1 YCapstone Design

IV-AEINDBASC
-/-/4/1.00

An experience in engineering practice through a significant design project whereby student teams meet specific client needs through a creative, iterative, and open-ended design process. The project must include:
• The application of disciplinary knowledge and skills to conduct engineering analysis and design,
• The demonstration of engineering judgment in integrating economic, health, safety, environmental, social or other pertinent interdisciplinary factors,
• Elements of teamwork, project management and client interaction, and
• A demonstration of proof of the design concept.


Exclusion: APS490Y1

MIE491Y1 YCapstone Design

IV-AEMECBASC
-/-/4/1.00

An experience in engineering practice through a significant design project whereby students teams meet specific client needs or the requirements of a recognized design competition through a creative, iterative, and open-ended design process.  The project must include:


Exclusion: APS490Y1

MIE498H1 F/SResearch Thesis

IV-AEINDBASC, IV-AEMECBASC
-/-/4/0.50

An opportunity to conduct independent research under the supervision of a faculty member in MIE. Admission to the course requires the approval of a project proposal by the Undergraduate office. The proposal must: 1) Explain how the research project builds upon one or more aspects of engineering science introduced in the student's academic program, 2) provide an estimate of a level of effort not less than 130  productive hours of work per term, 3) specify a deliverable in each term to be submitted by the last day of lectures, 4) be signed by the supervisor, and 5) be received by the Undergraduate Office one week prior to the last add day.

Note:  Approval to register for the fourth-year thesis course must be obtained from the Associate Chair – Undergraduate and is normally restricted to students with an overall average of at least B in their second and third years. 


Prerequisite: Approval to register for the fourth-year thesis course must be obtained from the Associate Chair – Undergraduate and is normally restricted to students with an overall average of at least B in their second and third years.
Exclusion: MIE498Y

MIE498Y1 YResearch Thesis

IV-AEINDBASC, IV-AEMECBASC
-/-/4/1.00

An opportunity to conduct independent research under the supervision of a faculty member in MIE. Admission to the course requires the approval of a project proposal by the Undergraduate office. The proposal must: 1) Explain how the research project builds upon one or more aspects of engineering science introduced in the student's academic program, 2) provide an estimate of a level of effort not less than 130 productive hours of work per term, 3) specify a deliverable in each term to be submitted by the last day of lectures, 4) be signed by the supervisor, and 5) be received by the Undergraduate Office one week prior to the last add day.


Note: Approval to register for the fourth-year thesis course must be obtained from the Associate Chair – Undergraduate and is normally restricted to students with an overall average of at least B in their second and third years.


Prerequisite: Approval to register for the fourth-year thesis course must be obtained from the Associate Chair – Undergraduate and is normally restricted to students with an overall average of at least B in their second and third years.
Exclusion: MIE498H

MIE504H1 SApplied Computational Fluid Dynamics

IV-AEMECBASC
3/-/-/0.50

The course is designed for Students with no or little Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) knowledge who want to learn CFD application to solve engineering problems. The course will provide a general perspective to the CFD and its application to fluid flow and heat transfer and it will teach the use of some of the popular CFD packages and provides them with the necessary tool to use CFD in specific applications.  Students will also learn basics of CFD and will use that basic knowledge to learn Fluent Ansys CFD software.  Most CFD packages have a variety of modules to deal with a specific type of flow.  Students will be introduced to different modules and their specific applications.    They will then be able to utilize the CFD package to simulate any particular problem.  Ansys software will be the commercial package that will be used in this course.  Ansys Fluent is the most common commercial CFD code available and most of the engineering companies use this code for their research & development and product analysis.


Prerequisite: MIE230H1, MAT234H1, MIE334H1

MIE505H1 SMicro/Nano Robotics

III-AEESCBASEZ, IV-AEMECBASC,
I-AEMINRAM
3/3/-/0.50

This course will cover the design, modeling, fabrication, and control of miniature robot and micro/nano-manipulation systems for graduate and upper level undergraduate students. Micro and Nano robotics is an interdisciplinary field which draws on aspects of microfabrication, robotics, medicine and materials science. 

In addition to basic background material, the course includes case studies of current micro/nano-systems, challenges and future trends, and potential applications.  The course will focus on a team design project involving novel theoretical and/or experimental concepts for micro/nano-robotic systems with a team of students.  Throughout the course, discussions and lab tours will be organized on selected topics.



MIE506H1 S* MEMS Design and Microfabrication

IV-AEESCBASET, IV-AEMECBASC,
I-AEMINNANO, I-AEMINRAM
3/1.50/1/0.50

This course will present the fundamental basis of microelectromechanical systems (MEMS). Topics will include: micromachining/microfabrication techniques, micro sensing and actuation principles and design, MEMS modeling and simulation, and device characterization and packaging. Students will be required to complete a MEMS design term project, including design modeling, simulation, microfabrication process design, and photolithographic mask layout.


Prerequisite: MIE222H1, MIE342H1

MIE515H1 FAlternative Energy Systems

IV-AECHEBASC, IV-AEESCBASEI,
IV-AEESCBASEJ, IV-AEMECBASC,
I-AEMINENR, I-AEMINENV
3/-/1/0.50

This course covers the basic principles, current technologies and applications of selected alternative energy systems. Specific topics include solar thermal systems, solar photovoltaic systems, wind, wave, and tidal energy,  energy storage, and grid connections issues.  Limited enrolment.


Prerequisite: MIE210H1,MIE312H1 and MIE313H1 (or equivalent courses).

MIE516H1 FCombustion and Fuels

IV-AECHEBASC, IV-AEESCBASEJ,
IV-AEMECBASC, I-AEMINENR
3/-/1/0.50

Introduction to combustion theory. Chemical equilibrium and the products of combustion. Combustion kinetics and types of combustion. Pollutant formation. Design of combustion systems for gaseous, liquid and solid fuels. The use of alternative fuels (hydrogen, biofuels, etc.) and their effect on combustion systems.



MIE517H1 SFuel Cell Systems

IV-AECHEBASC, IV-AEESCBASEJ,
IV-AEMECBASC, I-AEMINENR,
I-AEMINNANO
3/-/1/0.50

Thermodynamics and electrochemistry of fuel cell operation and testing; understanding of polarization curves and impedance spectroscopy; common fuel cell types, materials, components, and auxiliary systems; high and low temperature fuel cells and their applications in transportation and stationary power generation, including co-generation and combined heat and power systems; engineering system requirements resulting from basic fuel cell properties and characteristics.



MIE519H1 F* Advanced Manufacturing Technologies

IV-AEINDBASC, IV-AEMECBASC
3/-/-/0.50

This course is designed to provide an integrated multidisciplinary approach to Advanced Manufacturing Engineering, and provide a strong foundation including fundamentals and applications of advanced manufacturing AM. Topics include: additive manufacturing, 3D printing, micro and nanomanufacturing, intelligent manufacturing, Advanced Materials, lean manufacturing, AM in machine design and product development, process control technologies.  New applications of AM in sectors such as automotive, aerospace, biomedical, electronic, food processing.    



MIE520H1 FBiotransport Phenomena

IV-AEESCBASET, IV-AEMECBASC,
I-AEMINBIO
3/-/1/0.50

Application of conservation relations and momentum balances, dimensional analysis and scaling, mass transfer, heat transfer, and fluid flow to biological systems, including: transport in the circulation, transport in porous media and tissues, transvascular transport, transport of gases between blood and tissues, and transport in organs and organisms.


Prerequisite: MIE312H1 /AER210H1 /equivalent

MIE523H1 FEngineering Psychology and Human Performance

IV-AEINDBASC, IV-AEMECBASC,
I-AEMINBIO
3/3/-/0.50

An examination of the relation between behavioural science and the design of human-machine systems, with special attention to advanced control room design. Human limitations on perception, attention, memory and decision making, and the design of displays and intelligent machines to supplement them. The human operator in process control and the supervisory control of automated and robotic systems. Laboratory exercises to introduce techniques of evaluating human performance.


Prerequisite: MIE231H1/MIE236H1/STA286H1 or equivalent required; MIE237H1 or equivalent recommended

MIE540H1 SProduct Design

IV-AEMECBASC, I-AEMINBUS
3/-/1/0.50

This course takes a 360° perspective on product design: beginning at the market need, evolving this need into a concept, and optimizing the concept. Students will gain an understanding of the steps involved and the tools utilized in developing new products. The course will integrate both business and engineering concepts seamlessly through examples, case studies and a final project. Some of the business concepts covered include: identifying customer needs, project management and the economics of product design. The engineering design tools include: developing product specifications, concept generation, concept selection, FAST diagrams, orthogonal arrays, full and fractional factorials, noises, interactions, tolerance analysis and latitude studies. Specific emphasis will be placed on robust and tunable technology for product optimization and generating product families. Critical Parameters will be developed using the Voice of the Customer (VOC), FAST diagrams and a House of Quality (HOQ).


Prerequisite: MIE231H1/MIE236H1 or equivalent.

MIE542H1 SHuman Factors Integration

IV-AEINDBASC
3/-/2/0.50

The integration of human factors into engineering projects.  Human factors integration (HFI) process and systems constraints, HFI tools, and HFI best practices.  Modelling, economics, and communication of HFI problems.  Examples of HFI drawn from energy, healthcare, military, and software systems.  Application of HFI theory and methods to a capstone design project, including HFI problem specification, concept generation, and selection through an iterative and open-ended design process.


Prerequisite: MIE240H1/ MIE1411H1/ equivalent or permission from the instructor.

MIE550H1 SAdvanced Momentum, Heat and Mass Transfer

IV-AEMECBASC
3/-/-/0.50

This course observes: conservation of mass, momentum, energy and species; diffusive momentum, heat and mass transfer; dimensionless equations and numbers; laminar boundary layers; drag, heat transfer and mass transfer coefficients; transport analogies; simultaneous heat and mass transfer; as well as evaporative cooling, droplet evaporation and diffusion flames.


Prerequisite: MIE313H1

MIE561H1 SHealthcare Systems

IV-AEINDBASC, I-AEMINBIO
3/-/2/0.50

MIE 561 is a “cap-stone” course. Its purpose is to give students an opportunity to integrate the Industrial Engineering tools learned in previous courses by applying them to real world problems. While the specific focus of the case studies used to illustrate the application of Industrial Engineering will be the Canadian health care system, the approach to problem solving adopted in this course will be applicable to any setting. This course will provide a framework for identifying and resolving problems in a complex, unstructured decision-making environment. It will give students the opportunity to apply a problem identification framework through real world case studies. The case studies will involve people from the health care industry bringing current practical problems to the class. Students work in small groups preparing a feasibility study discussing potential approaches. Although the course is directed at Industrial Engineering fourth year and graduate students, it does not assume specific previous knowledge, and the course is open to students in other disciplines.



MIE562H1 FScheduling

IV-AEESCBASEF, IV-AEINDBASC
3/-/2/0.50

This course takes a practical approach to scheduling problems and solution techniques, motivating the different mathematical definitions of scheduling with real world scheduling systems and problems. Topics covered include: job shop scheduling, timetabling, project scheduling, and the variety of solution approaches including constraint programming, local search, heuristics, and dispatch rules. Also covered will be information engineering aspects of building scheduling systems for real world problems.


Prerequisite: MIE262H1

MIE563H1 FEngineering Analysis II

IV-AEMECBASC
3/-/2/0.50

This course explores exact solution techniques for common engineering Partial Differential Equations (PDEs), such as separation of variables, superposition, eigenfunctions, orthogonal functions, complex functions. Other topics include: derivation of common engineering PDEs, introduction to methods of weighted residuals for deriving finite element formulations and limitations of exact solutions relative to approximate solutions.


Prerequisite: MIE230H1, MAT234H1, MIE334H1

MIE566H1 FDecision Analysis

IV-AEESCBASEF, IV-AEINDBASC
3/-/2/0.50

The purpose of this course is to provide a working knowledge of methods of analysis of problem and of decision making in the face of uncertainty. Topics include decision trees, subjective probability assessment, multi-attribute utility approaches, goal programming, Analytic Hierarchy Process and the psychology of decision making.


Prerequisite: MIE231H1 / MIE236H1 or equivalent

MIE304H1 SIntroduction to Quality Control

IV-AECHEBASC, III-AEMECBASC
3/1/2/0.50

Introduction to quality engineering. Quality standards and certification. TQM. Modeling processes with simulation. Making inferences about product quality from real or simulation output data. Introduction to statistical process control. Control charts for variables and attributes. Process capability analysis. Lot Acceptance Sampling.


Prerequisite: MIE231 or equivalent

MIE366H1 FElectronics for Robots

III-AEESCBASEZ
3/1.50/2/0.50

The course provides an introduction to circuit analysis and design for mechatronics applications. The focus is on building a working knowledge of: (1) op-amp circuits, (2) step response, steady-state response, and frequency response, (3) passive and active filter design, and (4) applications of the above to mechatronics systems, including sensors and instrumentation. The course will continue with a study of the fundamental behaviour and specific applications of the major semiconductor devices, including (5) diodes and (6) field effect transistors. Additional ‘design assignments’ will require students to design real-world viable circuits for mechatronics applications, and laboratory experiments will present additional applications for all circuits being studied.



MIE507H1 SHeating, Ventilating, and Air Conditioning (HVAC) Fundamentals

IV-AEMECBASC, I-AEMINENR
3/-/2/0.50

Introduction to the fundamentals of HVAC system operation and the relationship between these systems, building occupants and the building envelope.  Fundamentals of psychrometrics, heat transfer and refrigeration; determination of heating and cooling loads driven by occupant requirements and the building envelope;  heating and cooling equipment types and HVAC system configurations;  controls and maintenance issues that influence performance; evaluation of various HVAC systems with respect to energy and indoor environmental quality performance.



MIE508H1 FFluids of Biological Systems

IV-AEMECBASC, I-AEMINBIO
3/-/1/0.50

This course will teach students how to apply fundamental fluid mechanics to the study of biological systems. The course is divided into three modules, with the focus of the first two modules on the human circulatory and respiratory systems, respectively. Topics covered will include blood rheology, blood flow in the heart, arteries, veins and microcirculation, the mechanical properties of the heart as a pump; air flow in the lungs and airways, mass transfer across the walls of these systems, the fluid mechanics of the liquid-air interface of the alveoli, and artificial mechanical systems and devices for clinical aid. The third and final module will cover a range of other fluid problems in modern biology. 


Mineral Engineering


MIN225H1 FIntroduction to the Resource Industries

I-AECERMINR, II-AELMEBASC
3/2/1/0.50

This course introduces the global resource industries in three parts. In Module 1, students learn about mineral resources in the economy, the origin of ore deposits, mineral exploration and processing techniques, land ownership and environmental issues. Engineering applications are emphasized. Exploration and development topics are investigated. Module 2 presents an introduction to modern mining engineering. The basics of both surface (open pit) and sub-surface mining is covered. Module 3 presents an introduction on the processing of mineral resources into metals. The course helps to develop communication skills through student presentations on current issues in the industry and through training in technical communications by faculty from the Engineering Communications Program. Training for AutoCad and an extensive communications module are provided in the laboratory section. Students will participate in a field trip to an operating mine.
*Only students enrolled in the Lassonde Mineral Engineering program are eligible to participate in the 2nd year field trip.



MIN250H1 SSurface Mining

I-AECERMINR, II-AELMEBASC
3/-/1/0.50

Operational aspects of open pit mine design and mine planning. Topics will include: open pit design and pit optimization; long term and short term planning considerations; materials handling; equipment selection and optimization; industrial minerals production; mine safety and mine regulations; mining and the environment; mine personnel organization; ethics and professional issues. Pit dewatering, the location and stability of waste dumps and an examination of equipment cost and production statistics are also included.



MIN301H1 SMineral Reserve and Mineral Resource Estimation

III-AELMEBASC
3/-/1/0.50

Introduction to Mineral Resource and Mineral Reserve Estimation is an advanced level course that focuses on the stages of a mineral resource and mineral reserve estimation program from assembling the database through to reporting under industry guidelines. Major course topics include: statistical analysis of sampling data, geologic interpretation and deposit models; mineral resources estimation approaches and methods, mineral reserve estimation, classification of resources and reserves, and reporting under regulatory standards and industry guidelines for professional practice.



MIN320H1 SExplosives and Fragmentation in Mining

III-AELMEBASC
3/-/1/0.50

Efficient drilling and blasting is important to successful mining in rock formations. This course studies the planning, design, and economics of rock blasting for a full range of surface and underground, mining and construction projects. Emphasis will be on optimization of fragmentation using blast geometry and those variables available to the field engineer. This course covers the selection of modern industrial explosives, their history, physical properties, and safe handling, including an introduction to the theory of detonation, and rock response. Safety procedures in storage and transportation will be studied along with the monitoring and control of blast side effects. A field trip is associated with this course.



MIN351H1 SUnderground Mining

I-AECERMINR, III-AELMEBASC
3/-/1/0.50

Operational aspects of underground mine design and mine planning. Topics will include: underground mining methods for hard and soft rock; shaft sinking, hoisting and materials handling; equipment selection and optimization; mine safety and mine regulations; mine personnel organization; ethics and professional issues. Development and production costs associated with mining are an inherent aspect of this course.


Exclusion: MIN350H1

MIN400H1 FGeology Field Camp for Engineers

IV-AELMEBASC
-/-/-/0.50

At Geology Field Camp, students will learn to incorporate geological observations into their engineering data sets.  The course will focus on the recognition of rock types in the field, mapping of geological structures related to mineralization of potential economic importance, and field measurement techniques for obtaining rock engineering data. Students will learn how to make geological observations that are of critical importance to their success as mineral engineers, and to foster a sense of excitement and curiosity about the rocks that form the physical environment within which they will work as professionals.  The course will be taught in the Sudbury region where there are several operating mines, numerous excellent field exposures of rocks related to the formation of the impact-related Sudbury structure, inexpensive accommodations, as well as unrelated older rock sequences typical of Archean greenstone belts where much of Canada's mineral exploration takes place.  Students attend the two week Geology Field Camp prior to the start of Fourth Year Fall Session.


Prerequisite: GLG207H1, GLG345H1, MIN429H1

MIN429H1 FEngineering Rock Mechanics

IV-AECIVBASC, III-AELMEBASC
3/1/1/0.50

This course introduces students to the fundamental concepts of rock mechanics and their application to rock engineering. The following rock mechanics topics are covered: stress and strain; in situ stress; intact rock strength; discontinuity geometry, strength and stiffness; rock mass behavious; anisotropy, heterogeneity and the size effect; rock mass classifcation schemes. Rock engineering topics include: rock excavation; rock stabilisation; instability mechanisms in foundationas and slopes; rock slope design methods; underground openings in discontinuous and continuous rocks; rock-support interaction; synopsis of numerical methods.  Associated laboratory sessions involve stress measurement, core logging, compressive strength determination and index testing.


Exclusion: CIV529H1.

MIN430H1 SMining Environmental Management

IV-AECIVBASC, III-AELMEBASC,
I-AEMINENV
3/-/1/0.50

This course provides an overview of the major aspects of mining environmental management from exploration, through design and development of the property, into operation, and final closure implementation. An applied approach is taken utilizing case studies and examples where possible. Participation and discussion is an integral part of the course. Topics include sustainable development, environmental impacts, designing for mitigation, environmental management systems and reclamation.



MIN450H1 FMineral Economics

IV-AELMEBASC
3/-/1/0.50

Course covers the evaluation of mineral projects, mining operations, and mining companies. Topics will include: discounted cash flow techniques including net present value (NPV), internal rate of return (IRR), net asset value (NAV); feasibility studies and due diligence reports; reserves and resources, data sources; metal prices and markets; cash flow modeling including revenue calculations, capital and operating costs, taxes, depreciation, inflation; risk and risk assessment, discount rates, red flags, checklists; financing. Guest lectures will provide industry insights into financing, fund raising, consulting, project control, and evaluation. There are two assignments: review of an annual report; due diligence report and net asset value calculation.


Prerequisite: CIV368H1/CME368H1

MIN466H1 FMineral Project Design I

IV-AELMEBASC
2/2/1/0.50

Mineral Project Design is a two-part capstone course that draws on all course materials developed in the first three years of the Mineral Engineering Curriculum. The course will culminate in the design of a mining or civil rock engineering project. In the first half of the course (F) students perform individual detailed case history analyses. Additional instruction in technical aspects of communication is provided during both semesters (preparing and writing technical reports, industry research and analysis, presentation skills, as well as other technical elements as required). These skills will form a foundation for students to use in industry. Critical non-technical aspects of rock engineering projects will also be examined, and guest speakers will present on specialized topics such as: cultural and social effects of rock engineering projects on communities and the environment; economic planning and impact; ethical considerations; aboriginal land claims, etc.. The social license to operate will be emphasized. Students will receive a final grade at the end of each term course, but both courses must be taken in sequence. (MIN 467H1 S cannot be taken without successful completion of MIN 466H1 F)


Prerequisite: MIN429H1, MIN350H1

MIN467H1 SMineral Project Design II

IV-AELMEBASC
1/4/1/0.50

Mineral Project Design is a two-part capstone course that draws on all course materials developed in the first three years of the Mineral Engineering Curriculum. Part II (S) focuses on the design of a mining or civil rock engineering project. Students will be grouped into teams and provided with one or more data sets and a design problem to solve. The end product is a major engineering design report and oral presentation (including several interim reports and presentations). Technical aspects will serve to examine a “cradle to grave” view of a project, from initial planning through to final closure and site remediation. The course will include an intensive two-day Professional Supervisors Short Course. Topics include: Discovering a commonality among supervisors and their key role in maintaining standards. The importance of sharing information and expectations about costs, production goals and business objectives are explored in the context of motivation. The necessity of successful communication skills and techniques are discussed and demonstrated to achieve behaviours on the job, producing consistent results. A reliable methodology for handling difficult situations is provided. The fundamental rationale for safety and loss control is presented as well as a relevant perspective on management structure. A workable code of conduct that is a guide to professional behaviour is developed. Students will receive a final grade at the end of each term course, but both courses must be taken in sequence (MIN 467H1 S cannot be taken without successful completion of MIN 466H1 F)


Prerequisite: MIN466H1

MIN470H1 SVentilation and Occupational Health

IV-AECIVBASC, IV-AELMEBASC
3/-/1/0.50

Hydraulics of air flow through underground openings is studied leading to mine ventilation design calculations and ventilation network analysis. Related topics discussed in the course include: statutory regulations and engineering design criteria; application and selection of ventilation fans; auxiliary fan design; air conditioning (heating and cooling); dust and fume control; ventilation economics. Health hazards related to mine gasses, dust and radiation along with relevant statutory requirements are reviewed. Air quality and quantity measurement and survey techniques are presented.


Prerequisite: CIV270H1/CME270H1

MIN511H1 FIntegrated Mine Waste Engineering

IV-AECIVBASC, IV-AELMEBASC,
I-AEMINENV
3/-/1/0.50

The engineering design of conventional mine waste management systems, including tailings ponds, rock dumps, and underground mine backfill systems, is considered first.  Emerging trends in integrated mine waste management systems, including paste stacking and "paste rock" on surface, and cemented paste backfill forunderground mining will then be covered. Engineering case studies will be used throughout, and each case study will be evaluated in terms of how the mine waste systems used contribute to the economic and environmental sustainability of the mining operation.


Prerequisite: CME321H1

MIN540H1 SBorehole Geophysics for Engineers and Geoscientists

IV-AECIVBASC
3/-/1/0.50

The process of wireline logging of boreholes for mineral, hydrocarbon and groundwater exploration, geotechnical and environmental studies involve a number of measurement devices, or sondes.  Some of these are passive measurement devices; others exert some influence over the rock formation being traversed.  Their measurements are transmitted to the surface by means of wire line.  Logging applications include the identification of geological environment, reservoir fluid contact location, fracture detection, estimate of hydrocarbon or water in place, determination of water salinity, reservoir pressure determination, porosity/pore size distribution determination, and reservoir fluid movement monitoring.



MIN565H1 SDesign and Support of Underground Mine Excavations

IV-AELMEBASC
3/-/1/0.50

Geomechanical issues concerning the design of underground openings in hard rock are covered in the course: ground support [i.e. rock mass reinforcement] design, the dimensioning and sequencing of underground excavations and rock pillar design in hard rock applications. A review of modern concepts concerning rock and rock mass failure modes with application to support design is given. Both static and dynamic [rockburst] support design issues are addresses. Lastly instrumentation and monitoring techniques and backfill design and behaviour are also covered. Design issues are illustrated through the use of numerous field case studies .


Prerequisite: MIN429H1/CIV529H1

CME499H1 F/SIndividual Project

IV-AECIVBASC, IV-AELMEBASC
-/-/3/0.50
Individual Projects are arranged between the student and a supervising faculty member. The individual project can have either a design project focus or a research focus. If the focus is on design then the design project can be either motivated by the CIV498H1 Group Design Project and MIN466 Mineral Project Design experience, or it can be entirely new. The student’s work must culminate in a final design report or a thesis, as well as an oral presentation. The grading of both the final written submission as well as the oral presentation is carried out by the supervising faculty member.  The Individual Project may be undertaken only once, either in the Fall (F) or Winter (S) Session (0.5 weight), or as a full year (Y) course (1.0 weight). 

Molecular Genetics and Microbiology


MGY377H1 FMicrobiology I: Bacteria

I-AEMINBIO
3/-/-/0.50

An in depth study of bacteria including their structure, their biology, their ability to adapt, and their effects on human health. Provides a foundation for advanced studies in bacterial physiology, bacterial genetics, molecular pathogenesis of disease, immunology, and environmental studies.


Prerequisite: BCH210H1/BCH242Y1; BIO120H1, BIO230H1
Exclusion: BIO370Y5 (UTM)

Pharmacology and Toxicology


PCL201H1 SIntroduction to Pharmacology and Pharmacokinetic Principles

I-AEMINBIO
3/-/1a/0.50

A general introduction to the principles of pharmacology and pharmacokinetics. Topics include chemical (drug) absorption, distribution, biotransformation, elimination; the calculation of dosages and pharmacokinetic parameters, variability in drug response, adverse drug reactions and special interest topics.


Corequisite: Recommended Co-requisites: BIO230H1/(BIO240H1, BIO241H1), CHM247H1/CHM249H1, PSL300H1/PSL301H1

PCL302H1 FPharmacodynamic Principles

I-AEMINBIO
3/-/-/0.50

Topics include biological action of drugs on membranes, enzymes, receptors, neural and hormonal systems, transmission and modulation.


Prerequisite: BIO230H1/(BIO240H1, BIO241H1), CHM247H1/CHM249H1, (PSL300H1, PSL301H1)/PSL302Y1

Philosophy


PHL281H1 SBioethics (formerly PHL281Y1)

I-AEMINBIO
-/-/-/0.50

An introduction to the study of moral and legal problems in medical practice and in biomedical research; the development of health policy. Topics include: concepts of health and disease, patient rights, informed consent, allocation of scarce resources, euthanasia, abortion, genetic and reproductive technologies, human research, and mental health.


Exclusion: PHL281Y1

PHL295H1 FBusiness Ethics

I-AEMINBUS
-/-/-/0.50

Philosophical issues in ethics, social theory, and theories of human nature insofar as they bear on contemporary conduct of business. Issues include: Does business have moral responsibilities? Can social costs and benefits be calculated? Does modern business life determine human nature or the other way around? Do political ideas and institutions such as democracy have a role within business?



PHL342H1 FMinds and Machines
3/-/-/0.50

Topics include: philosophical foundations of artificial intelligence theory; the computational theory of the mind; functionalism vs. reductionism; the problems of meaning in the philosophy of mind.


Prerequisite: 7.5 courses (in any field) with at least 1.5 in philosophy/COG250Y1

Physics


PHY180H1 FClassical Mechanics

I-AEESCBASE
3/1.50/1/0.50

Mechanics forms the basic background for the understanding of physics. This course on Classical, or Newtonian mechanics, considers the interactions which influence motion. These interactions are described in terms of the concepts of force, momentum and energy. Initially the focus is on the mechanics of a single particle, considering its motion in a particular frame of reference, and transformations between reference frames. Then the dynamics of systems of particles is examined.


Corequisite: MAT194H1
Exclusion: MIE100H1

PHY293H1 FWaves and Modern Physics

II-AEESCBASE
3/1/1/0.50

The first half of the semester will give an introduction to the basic ideas of classical oscillations and waves. Topics include simple harmonic motion, forced and damped harmonic motion, coupled oscillations, normal modes, the wave equation, travelling waves and reflection and transmission at interfaces.  The second half of the semester will first give an introduction to Einstein's special relativity, including evidence for the frame-independence of the speed of light, time dilation, length contraction, causality, and the relativistic connection between energy and momentum.  Then we will follow the historical development of quantum mechanics with the photo-electric and Compton effects, the Bohr atom, wave-particle duality, leading to Schrödinger's equation and wave functions with a discussion of their general properties and probabilistic interpretation.


Corequisite: MAT292H1
Exclusion: MIE333H1
Recommended Preparation: MAT195H1

PHY294H1 SQuantum and Thermal Physics

II-AEESCBASE
3/1/1/0.50

The first half of the semester will continue with the development of quantum mechanics. Topics will include Shrödinger's wave mechanics, tunneling, bound states in potential wells, the quantum oscillator, and atomic spectra.  The second half of the semester will give an introduction to the basic ideas of classical statistical mechanics and radiation, with applications to experimental physics.  Topics will include Boltzmann's interpretation of entropy, Maxwell-Boltzman statistics, energy equipartition, the perfect gas laws, and blackbody radiation.


Prerequisite: PHY293H1
Exclusion: MIE333H1
Recommended Preparation: MAT292H1

PHY327H1 F/SAdvanced Physics Laboratory

III-AEESCBASEP
-/6/-/0.50

Experiments in this course are designed to form a bridge to current experimental research. A wide range of experiments are available using contemporary techniques and equipment. In addition to the standard set of experiments a limited number of research projects are also available. Many of the experiments can be carried out with a focus on instrumentation.



PHY354H1 SClassical Mechanics

III-AEESCBASEP
2/-/1/0.50

Symmetry and conservation laws, stability and instability, generalized coordinates, Hamilton's principle, Hamilton's equations, phase space, Liouville's theorem, canonical transformations, Poisson brackets, Noether's theorem.


Prerequisite: MAT244H1/MAT267H1, PHY254H1
Exclusion: PHY351H1

PHY356H1 FQuantum Mechanics I

III-AEESCBASEP, IV-AEESCBASER
2/-/1/0.50

The general structure of wave mechanics; eigenfunctions and eigenvalues; operators; orbital angular momentum; spherical harmonics; central potential; separation of variables; hydrogen atom; Dirac notation; operator methods; harmonic oscillator and spin.


Prerequisite: MAT223H1/MAT240H1, PHY250H1, PHY256H1/(CHM222H1,CHM223H1)/CHM225Y1, (PHY256H1 recommended)
Corequisite: MAT244H1
Exclusion: CHM326H1, PHY355H1

PHY357H1 SNuclear and Particle Physics

IV-AEESCBASEP
2/-/1/0.50

The subatomic particles; nuclei, baryons and mesons, quarks, leptons and bosons; the structure of nuclei and hadronic matter; symmetries and conservation laws; fundamental forces and interactions, electromagnetic, weak, and strong; a selection of other topics: CP violation, nuclear models, standard model, proton decay, supergravity, nuclear and particle astrophysics. This course is not a prerequisite for any PHY400-level course.


Prerequisite: PHY356H1

PHY358H1 SAtoms, Molecules and Solids

IV-AEESCBASEP, I-AEMINNANO
2/-/1/0.50

Quantum theory of atoms, molecules, and solids; variational principle and perturbation theory; hydrogen and helium atoms; exchange and correlation energies; multielectron atoms; simple molecules; bonding and antibonding orbitals; rotation and vibration of molecules; crystal binding; electron in a periodic potential; reciprocal lattice; Bloch's theorem; nearly-free electron model; Kronig-Penney model; energy bands; metals, semiconductors, and insulators; Fermi surfaces. This course is not a prerequisite for any PHY400-level course.


Prerequisite: PHY356H1

PHY392H1 SPhysics of Climate

IV-AEESCBASEP
2/-/-/0.50

This course provides an introduction to climate physics and the earth-atmosphere-ocean system.  Topics include solar and terrestrial radiation; global energy balance; radiation laws; radiative transfer; atmospheric structure; convection; the meridional structure of the atmosphere; the general circulation of the atmosphere; the ocean and its circulation; and climate variability.


Prerequisite: PHY231H1/PHY250H1, MAT235Y1/MAT237Y1/MAT257Y1
Exclusion: PHY315H1

PHY407H1 FComputational Physics

IV-AEESCBASEP
1/3/-/0.50

This is an introduction to scientific computing in physics. Students will be introduced to computational techniques used in a range of physics research areas.  By considering selected physics topics, students will learn computational methods for function analysis, ODEs, PDEs, eigenvalue problems, non-linear equations and Monte Carlo techniques. A physicist's "computational survival toolkit" will also be developed to introduce students to topics such as command line programming, bash scripting, debugging, solution visualization, computational efficiency and accuracy. The course is based on python and will involve working on a set of computational labs throughout the semester as well as a final project.


Prerequisite: PHY224H1/PHY254H1
Corequisite: Any PHY300-level lecture course in Physics. PHY407H1 may be taken in third or fourth year
Exclusion: PHY307H1

PHY408H1 STime Series Analysis

IV-AEESCBASEP
1/2/-/0.50

The analysis of digital sequences; filters; the Fourier Transform; windows; truncation effects; aliasing; auto and cross-correlation; stochastic processes, power spectra; least squares filtering; application to real data series and experimental design.


Prerequisite: PHY407H1/PHY224H1/PHY250H1/PHY254H1/PHY324H1. PHY408H1 may be taken in third or fourth year
Corequisite: Any third-year lecture course in Physics
Exclusion: PHY308H1

PHY427H1 F/SAdvanced Physics Laboratory

IV-AEESCBASEP, I-AEMINNANO
-/6/-/0.50

Experiments in this course are designed to form a bridge to current experimental research. A wide range of experiments are available using contemporary techniques and equipment. In addition to the standard set of experiments, a limited number of research projects may be available. This laboratory is a continuation of PHY327.


Prerequisite: PHY327H1

PHY428H1 F/SAdvanced Practical Physics II

IV-AEESCBASEP
-/6/-/0.50

This course is a continuation of PHY426H1, but students have more freedom to progressively focus on specific areas of physics, do extended experiments, projects, or computational modules.


Prerequisite: PHY426H1

PHY429H1 F/SAdvanced Practical Physics III

IV-AEESCBASEP
-/6/-/0.50

This course is a continuation of PHY428H1, but students have more freedom to progressively focus on specific areas of physics, do extended experiments, projects, or computational modules.


Prerequisite: PHY428H1

PHY450H1 SRelativistic Electrodynamics

IV-AEESCBASEP, I-AEMINNANO
2m/-/1m/0.50

The course illustrates, using classical electromagnetism, how symmetry principles and scaling arguments combine to determine the basic laws of physics. It is shown that the electromagnetic action (from which follow the equations of motion) is uniquely fixed by the principles of special relativity, gauge invariance, and locality. Additional topics include motion of relativistic particles in external electric and magnetic fields, radiation from point charges, and the breakdown of classical electromagnetism.


Prerequisite: PHY350H1
Exclusion: PHY353H1

PHY452H1 SStatistical Mechanics

IV-AEESCBASEP, I-AEMINNANO
2/-/-/0.50

Classical and quantum statistical mechanics of noninteracting systems; the statistical basis of thermodynamics; ensembles, partition function; thermodynamic equilibrium; stability and fluctuations; formulation of quantum statistics; theory of simple gases; ideal Bose and Fermi systems.


Prerequisite: PHY252H1, PHY256H1
Exclusion: PHY480H1

PHY454H1 SContinuum Mechanics

IV-AEESCBASEP
2/-/1/0.50

The theory of continuous matter, including solid and fluid mechanics.Topics include the continuum approximation, dimensional analysis, stress, strain, the Euler and Navier-Stokes equations, vorticity, waves, instabilities, convection and turbulence.


Prerequisite: PHY254H1, MAT235Y1/MAT237Y1/MAT257Y1, APM346H1/APM351Y1
Exclusion: PHY459H1

PHY456H1 FQuantum Mechanics II

IV-AEESCBASEP, IV-AEESCBASER,
I-AEMINNANO
2/-/1/0.50

Quantum dynamics in Heisenberg and Schrdinger pictures; WKB approximation; variational method; time-independent perturbation theory; spin; addition of angular momentum; time-dependent perturbation theory; scattering.


Prerequisite: PHY356H1
Exclusion: PHY457H1

PHY460H1 SNonlinear Physics

IV-AEESCBASEP
2/-/-/0.50

The theory of nonlinear dynamical systems with applications to many areas of physics. Topics include stability, bifurcations, chaos, universality, maps, strange attractors and fractals. Geometric, analytical and computational methods will be developed.


Prerequisite: PHY354H1

PHY483H1 FRelativity Theory I

IV-AEESCBASEP
2/-/-/0.50

Basis of Einstein's theory: differential geometry, tensor analysis, gravitational physics leading to General Relativity. Theory starting from solutions of Schwarzschild, Kerr, etc.


Prerequisite: PHY350H1, PHY354H1

PHY484H1 SRelativity Theory II

IV-AEESCBASEP
2/-/-/0.50

Applications of General Relativity to Astrophysics and Cosmology. Introduction to black holes, large-scale structure of the universe.


Prerequisite: PHY483H1
Recommended Preparation: APM346H1/APM351Y1

PHY485H1 FLaser Physics

IV-AEESCBASEP, I-AEMINNANO
2/-/-/0.50

This course, which is intended to be an introduction to research in optical sciences, covers the statistics of optical fields and the physics of lasers. Topics include the principles of laser action, laser cavities, properties of laser radiation and its propagation, the diffraction of light, and spatial and temporal coherence.


Prerequisite: PHY350H1, PHY356H1, PHY385H1/ECE318

PHY487H1 FCondensed Matter Physics

IV-AEESCBASEP, IV-AEESCBASER,
I-AEMINNANO
2/-/-/0.50

Introduction to the concepts used in the modern treatment of solids. The student is assumed to be familiar with elementary quantum mechanics. Topics include: crystal structure, the reciprocal lattice, crystal binding, the free electron model, electrons in periodic potential, lattice vibrations, electrons and holes, semiconductors, metals.


Prerequisite: PHY356H1, PHY252H1, PHY250H1

PHY489H1 FIntroduction to High Energy Physics

IV-AEESCBASEP
2/-/-/0.50

This course introduces the basics of fundamental particles and the strong, weak and electromagnetic forces that govern their interactions in the Standard Model of particle physics. Topics include relativistic kinematics, conservation laws, particle decays and scattering processes, with an emphasis on the techniques used for calculating experimental observables.


Prerequisite: PHY354H1, PHY356H1

PHY492H1 FAdvanced Atmospheric Physics

IV-AEESCBASEA, IV-AEESCBASEP
2/-/-/0.50

A preparatory course for research in experimental and theoretical atmospheric physics. Content will vary from year to year. Themes may include techniques for remote sensing of the Earth's atmosphere and surface; theoretical atmosphere-ocean dynamics; the physics of clouds, precipitation, and convection in the Earth's atmosphere.


Exclusion: PHY498H1

PHY495H1 FResearch Topic in Geophysics

IV-AEESCBASEP
2/-/-/0.50

A research project done in consultation with an individual staff member on a geophysics-related topic leading to a detailed written report and oral presentation.  The course will also involve weekly lectures where the student will be introduced to various geophysical research methods and current research topics in geophysics. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.


Corequisite: PHY395H1/PHY493H1/PHY494H1

Physiology


PSL300H1 FHuman Physiology I

I-AEMINBIO
3/-/1m/0.50

Principles of neurophysiology, endocrinology and reproductive physiology for students enroled in Life Science programs.


Exclusion: PSL201Y1, PSL302Y1
Recommended Preparation: BIO130H1/BIO150Y1; CHM138H1/CHM151Y1; and 1 FCE from any of the following: MAT135H1, MAT136H1, MAT135Y1, MAT137Y1, MAT157Y1, PHY131H1, PHY132H, PHY151H1, PHY152H1

Political Science


POL201Y1 YPolitics of Development: Issues and Controversies

I-AECERGLOB
2m/-/1m/0.50

A survey of the developmental challenges facing societies in Latin America, the Caribbean, Asia and Africa, and the efficacy of various development strategies and policies in meeting these challenges.


Prerequisite: 1.0 POL credit/4.0 full course equivalents
Exclusion: POLB90H3/POLB91H3

POL208Y1 YIntroduction to International Relations

I-AECERGLOB
2m/-/1m/0.50

The course analyzes the impact of the individual, the nation-state, and the international and transnational systems on international conflict and conflict resolution, and examines the major problems the international community confronts in a rapidly changing international environment.


Prerequisite: 1.0 POL credit /4.0 full course equivalents
Exclusion: POLB80H3/POLB81H3
Recommended Preparation: Prior reading or study of modern history

Robotics


ROB301H1 FIntroduction to Robotics

III-AEESCBASEZ
3/1.50/1/0.50

The course is intended to provide an introduction and a very interdisciplinary experience to robotics.  The structure of the course is modular and reflects the perception-control-action paradigm of robotics.  The course, however, aims for breadth, covering an introduction to the key aspects of general robotic systems, rather than depth, which is available in later more advanced courses.  Applications addressed include robotics in space, autonomous terrestrial exploration, biomedical applications such as surgery and assistive robots, and personal robotics.  The course culminates in a hardware project centered on robot integration.


Recommended Preparation: AER201H1

ROB310H1 FMathematics for Robotics

III-AEESCBASEA, III-AEESCBASEZ
3/-/1/0.50

The course addresses advanced mathematical concepts particularly relevant for robotics. The mathematical tools covered in this course are fundamental for understanding, analyzing, and designing robotics algorithms that solve tasks such as robot path planning, robot vision, robot control and robot learning. Topics include complex analysis, optimization techniques, signals and filtering, advanced probability theory, and numerical methods. Concepts will be studied in a mathematically rigorous way but will be motivated with robotics examples throughout the course.


Recommended Preparation: ESC103H1, MAT185H1, STA286H1 and MAT292H1

ROB501H1 FComputer Vision for Robotics

IV-AEESCBASEZ
3/-/1/0.50

An introduction to aspects of computer vision specifically relevant to robotics applications. Topics include the geometry of image formation, basic image processing operations, camera models and calibration methods, image feature detection and matching, stereo vision, structure from motion and 3D reconstruction. Discussion of moving object identification and tracking as time permits.


Exclusion: CSC420H1
Recommended Preparation: CSC263H1

Statistics


STA286H1 SProbability and Statistics

II-AEESCBASE
3/-/1/0.50

A course in probability and statistics for Engineering Science students focusing on building solid probabilistic and statistical foundations. Topics include: sample space, events, definitions of probability, conditional probability, Bayes' theorem, important classes of discrete and continuous random variables and  their distributions, joint, conditional, and marginal distributions,  expectation, moment generating and characteristic functions, transformations of random variables, central limit theorem and  approximations. Graphical methods, quantile plots, point and interval estimation of population parameters, method of maximum likelihood. Hypotheses testing, simple and multiple regression, correlation analysis, and introduction to Bayesian statistics. Minitab software is used to solve some assignment problems in the course.


Exclusion: CHE223H1, CME263H1, MSE238H1, MIE236H1, MIE237H1, MIE231H1 or STA257H1

STA302H1 FMethods of Data Analysis I

III-AEESCBASEF
3/-/-/0.50

Introduction to data analysis with a focus on regression. Initial Examination of data. Correlation. Simple and multiple regression models using least squares. Inference for regression parameters, confidence and prediction intervals. Diagnostics and remedial measures. Interactions and dummy variables. Variable selection. Least squares estimation and inference for non-linear regression.


Prerequisite: STA248H1/STA255H1/STA261H1/ECO227Y1

STA347H1 FProbability

III-AEESCBASEF
3/-/-/0.50

An overview of probability from a non-measure theoretic point of view. Random variables/vectors; independence, conditional expectation/probability and consequences. Various types of convergence leading to proofs of the major theorems in basic probability. An introduction to simple stochastic processes such as Poisson and branching processes.


Prerequisite: STA247H1/STA255H1/STA257H1/ECO227Y1,MAT223H1/MAT240H1; MAT235Y1/MAT237Y1/MAT257Y1 (Note: STA257H1 and MAT237Y1/MAT257Y1; (MAT223H1, MAT224H1)/MAT240H1 are very strongly recommended)

STA410H1 FStatistical Computation

IV-AEESCBASEF
3/-/-/0.50

Programming in an interactive statistical environment. Generating random variates and evaluating statistical methods by simulation. Algorithms for linear models, maximum likelihood estimation, and Bayesian inference. Statistical algorithms such as the Kalman filter and the EM algorithm. Graphical display of data.


Prerequisite: STA302H1, CSC108H1/CSC120H1/CSC121H1/CSC148H1

STA447H1 SStochastic Processes (formerly STA348H1)

IV-AEESCBASEF
3/-/-/0.50

Discrete and continuous time processes with an emphasis on Markov, Gaussian and renewal processes. Martingales and further limit theorems. A variety of applications taken from some of the following areas are discussed in the context of stochastic modeling: Information Theory, Quantum Mechanics, Statistical Analyses of Stochastic Processes, Population Growth Models, Reliability, Queuing Models, Stochastic Calculus, Simulation (Monte Carlo Methods).


Prerequisite: STA347H1