2013-2014 Calendar

Curriculum and Programs

ACCREDITATION AND THE ASSOCIATIONS OF PROFESSIONAL ENGINEERS

The practice of engineering is regulated, by statute, in all Canadian provinces and territories. To become a Professional Engineer you must satisfy the requirements of the licensing bodies. These requirements include a degree from an accredited program, successful completion of a professional practice examination in engineering law and ethics, and suitable experience.

All programs listed in this Calendar are accredited and evaluated regularly by the Canadian Engineering Accreditation Board (CEAB) of the Canadian Council of Professional Engineers. Therefore graduation from the Faculty of Applied Science and Engineering may lead to registration as a Professional Engineer in the provincial Associations of Professional Engineers, in accordance with their individual policies.

No student will be permitted to graduate who does not meet these requirements as this would jeopardize accreditation for the program.

Detailed information about the Canadian Council of Professional Engineers can be found at: www.ccpe.ca

GENERAL PROGRAM GUIDELINES

Each program in Engineering and in Engineering Science consists of a technical component and a complementary studies component. The curriculum provides considerable latitude to students in choosing their programs of study. On the following pages the curriculum of each program is set forth in detail. The curriculum for students in First Year (in First and Second Years in Engineering Science) forms a basis in the fundamental subjects prior to subsequent specialization in various Engineering disciplines. Students are able to choose from a range of technical electives in their senior years. In the Fourth Year, all programs contain a thesis or a design project, which provides students with the opportunity to carry out original work in their chosen fields of study.

The curricula, regulations and course information contained in this Calendar are valid for the current academic year only and so, over the course of a student’s attendance in the Faculty, curricula, regulations and course information may change. All such changes will be posted on the Undergraduate Engineering website.

The Faculty reserves the right to withdraw any course for which there is insufficient enrolment or resources, and to limit the enrolment in any course.

Weight Factor

Weight Factors are associated with every course, and are intended to help students determine the relative weight of every course, in terms of time spent in class. Most courses in the Faculty of Applied Science and Engineering are weighted 0.5, but some (full year courses) are weighted at 1.0 and others (quarter courses) are weighted at 0.25. Weight factors for courses outside of the Faculty may vary.

Weight factors are used to calculate what is referred to as the ‘weighted session average’ used in promotions. A regular program normally consists of five courses per session with a total weight of 2.5 credits; with prior approval of the Chair of their Department, full-time students may elect to increase their loads to a maximum of 3.0 credits per session.

To be eligible for any scholarship or award granted solely on academic standing, a student must have completed not less than the normal full load (2.5 credits per term) within the two sessions upon which the award is based. A student whose program in these two sessions contains repeated courses will only be eligible if the aggregate of new courses is equal to or greater than 2.5 credits per term.

COURSE DEFINITIONS

Core Course
A core course is defined as any course in a Program of Study that is expressly required by a department or division in order to fulfill degree requirements.

Electives
Elective courses fall into three categories: Technical Electives; Free Electives; and Complementary Studies Electives. In general, students must not select elective courses that would involve excessive duplication of material covered elsewhere in their programs. As the promotion of engineering students is based on weighted session averages, honours/pass/fail or credit/no-credit courses may not be taken as electives.

Technical Electives
Each program has a selection of Technical Electives, carefully designed to enhance students’ technical knowledge in specific areas. Details regarding technical electives can be found under each program listing.

Free Electives
Some programs require students to take a Free Elective. A Free Elective has few restrictions: any degree credit course listed in the current calendars of the Faculty of Applied Science and Engineering, the Faculty of Arts and Science, and the School of Graduate Studies is acceptable as a Free Elective provided it does not duplicate material covered in courses taken or to be taken.

Complementary Studies
All students are required to take Complementary Studies electives at some point during their program.
   Complementary studies is broadly defined as studies in humanities, social sciences, arts, management, engineering economics and communication that complement the technical content in the curriculum. Language courses may be included within complementary studies provided they are not taken to fulfill an admission requirement.
   Within this context of complementary studies, the Faculty is aware of the heavy responsibility that lies on the shoulders of engineers in our modern technological society, and it strives to educate engineers with a strong sense of responsibility to others. The Faculty therefore requires from students a firm foundation of engineering ethics, familiarity with their heritage and history, and sensitivity to the social context in which they function. To this end, in addition to developing competence in appropriate aspects of mathematics, the physical sciences and design, aspiring engineers must acquire an understanding of the humane aspects of engineering. Therefore, some areas of study under the heading of complementary studies are considered to be essential in the education of an engineer, namely these four elements (described in more detail below):

  1. An introduction to the methodologies and thought process of the humanities and social sciences,
  2. A basic knowledge of engineering economics,
  3. Competence in oral and written communications,
  4. An awareness of the impact of technology on society.

Some of these elements have been incorporated into the set curriculum for each program; others are introduced through the selection of Humanities and Social Science (HSS) and Complementary Studies (CS) electives.We urge students to plan their complementary studies electives in accordance with their career aspirations; however, to ensure eligibility for registration as a professional engineer, HSS/CS electives must fit set definitions as outlined below. Please note that HSS electives are a sub-set of CS electives, so while all HSS electives can count towards CS requirements, not all CS electives can be considered HSS electives. A listing of appropriate HSS and CS electives can be found on the Engineering website, at:
uoft.me/electives

1.  Humanities and Social Sciences (HSS)
Engineers’ colleagues frequently have a background in the humanities and social sciences rather than in the physical or mathematical sciences, so students need to have some understanding of the modes of thought used in these disciplines. The Faculty of Arts and Science offers a very comprehensive selection of such courses. Individual programs have various requirements and opportunities to take Humanities and Social Sciences electives. Subject to conditions imposed by the Faculty of Arts and Science, students may choose any course that does not include: languages, grammar, mathematics (including symbolic logic and probability & inductive logic), economics, technique (e.g. art, music, video production), physical and life sciences (including, but not limited to astronomy, physics, chemistry, biology, zoology, computer science and psychology). A course must be pre-approved as HSS-eligible by the Faculty before a student may enrol.

The HSS courses that are available to students are listed here:  uoft.me/hss
Students seeking a broader choice in their Humanities and Social Sciences electives can obtain more information about appropriate courses and enrolment procedures from the Faculty Registrar’s Office (www.undergrad.engineering.utoronto.ca) or their departmental office. Enrolment may involve submission of a ballot or consultation with the offering department.

2. Engineering Economics
Each program includes at least one required course on engineering economics. These courses provide an opportunity for students to become familiar with the basic tools used to assess the economic viability of proposed engineering projects. The program-required courses are: CHE249H1 F, CME368H1 S, MIE258H1 F, ECE472H1 F/S, CHE374H1 F

3. Oral and Written Communications
Engineers must be able to communicate their ideas effectively to peers, other professionals, and the public at large. Technically sound solutions will often be accepted only after the engineer has convinced the public and governmental agencies that they are also socially acceptable. Consequently, technical communication is essential to Engineering. Each program includes the equivalent of one course on technical communication and takes part in a Language Across the Curriculum program that develops communication skills in core engineering courses. The communication courses and the Language program aim to develop skills in report writing, public speaking and graphical presentation with the goal that students will gain solid experience as technical communicators before graduation.

4. Impact of Technology on Society
The courses APS111H1 F and APS112H1 S Engineering Strategies & Practice I and II are required for all programs except Engineering Science, for which ESC101H1 F and ESC102H1 S, Engineering Science Praxis I and II are required.

Letters of Permission

A Letter of Permission is required for engineering students seeking to take a course from another university. The Letter of Permission will outline the course(s) the student has permission to take, the transfer credit(s) that can be granted, and how they will be applied to the degree (as extra credit, technical elective, HSS/CS, etc).

Students may request any course from a recognized Canadian University, or from an international university that the University of Toronto has an exchange agreement with. Students wishing to take a course from an institution not noted in one of these two categories should note that the course will be closely examined to ensure it is comparable to the academic standards of the University of Toronto. Courses should be academically rigorous and include a written examination, or a significant component of closely supervised work. Online courses will be subject to a special review, to ensure they meet the expectations of the University of Toronto.

 Core courses are not usually approved on a Letter of Permission.

 To receive credit for completing a course on Letter of Permission, the student must achieve at least one full letter grade above a pass at the host institution, or 60% using the University of Toronto grading scale.

 The Letter of Permission request form can be found at the Engineering Undergraduate Admissions Office, located within the Galbraith building at 35 St. George Street, Room 153. This form must be submitted with a copy of the official course description from the host institution’s academic calendar. A non refundable processing fee of $30 per letter of permission will be charged.

 Please note that a Letter of Permission does not apply to courses taken while participating in an official International Exchange.

PRACTICAL EXPERIENCE REQUIREMENT

Every student must complete a minimum of 600 hours of practical work before graduation. The nature of the work should form an integral part of a student’s education and career development. It therefore must contain a good measure of responsibility (e.g., management of programs, systems, equipment, personnel, or finances), sound judgment and effective communication, and be supportive of the professional career of the student after graduation. Work in many facets of industry, government or public service would be acceptable for this requirement.

This experience may be obtained at any time during the program or through the Engineering Summer Internship Program (eSIP) or Professional Experience Year (PEY) Program, but work done before entering the Faculty may also meet the requirement.  Participation in the Professional Experience Year or the Engineering Summer Internship Program automatically satisfies the practical experience requirement, provided that students complete and submit the requisite reports.

Practical experience certificate forms may be obtained from the Registrar’s website and shall be signed by the employer or supervisor. Students should return completed forms to their departmental counsellor’s office. The satisfaction or non-satisfaction of this requirement for graduation will be indicated on the student’s grade report in the fourth year winter session as a grade of CR (Credit) or NCR (No Credit).

The Professional Engineers of Ontario (PEO) may allow pre-graduation experience to count towards 12 months of the four year “engineering experience” required for eligibility for the P.Eng. designation. For further information visit the PEO web site www.peo.on.ca. Please note that the records required by the PEO are separate and distinct from the 600 hours practical experience required for completion of a degree program in the Faculty of Applied Science and Engineering.

Students are required to have completed a total of 600 hours of acceptable practical experience before graduation (normally during their summer vacation periods). Students registered within this program, may elect to enrol and participate in the Engineering Summer Internship Program (eSIP) and the Professional Experience Year (PEY) program. The eSIP program is a paid 4month summer program open to qualified students and serves as an introductory career development program to the PEY. The PEY program requires that qualified students undertake a paid, full-time 12-16 month continuous work period with a participating company.

ENGINEERING SUMMER INTERNSHIP PROGRAM (eSIP) PROGRAM

ENGINEERING SUMMER INTERNSHIP PROGRAM (eSIP)

www.engineeringcareers.utoronto.ca

222 College Street, Suite 106
Telephone: 416-946-3730
Email: career@ecf.utoronto.ca

The Engineering Summer Internship Program (eSIP) is a paid summer co-op program offered through the Engineering Career Centre.  It is available to eligible engineering students in year 2 or 3 of study, including engineering international students. eSIP is more akin to a traditional co-op placement, where students work for four months and thus serves as an introductory career development program for participants. Through formalized and interactive workshops and individual counseling appointments, students are introduced to concepts and tools to prepare them for the workplace.  The majority of applicants are in their year 2 of study, for which eSIP holds particular value in preparing students to be competitive for future opportunities, such as the intensive model of the PEY internship.

PROFESSIONAL EXPERIENCE YEAR (PEY) INTERNSHIP PROGRAM

PROFESSIONAL EXPERIENCE YEAR (PEY) PROGRAM

www.engineeringcareers.utoronto.ca
222 College Street, Suite 106
Telephone: 416-978-3881
Email: pey@ecf.utoronto.ca

The Professional Experience Year (PEY) Internship Program offered through Engineering Career Centre (ECC) allows students to apply their engineering knowledge in a 12-16 month project-based professional internship. The length of the internship offers students sufficient time to become involved in large-scale projects, build relationships with employers, and reach professional milestones. Students who elect to participate in this optional program make industry contacts, gain valuable career skills and significant professional experience before graduation.  The PEY internship program is more than 30 years old and during this time it has earned an outstanding reputation in both academic and industry circles. It offers students an exceptional education, a range of engineering related career paths to choose from, and strong, established industry partnerships. It also provides a strong practical foundation for individuals who are interested in completing graduate studies. Students who participate in the program are enrolled in the nine Engineering programs, as well as Computer Science, Mathematics, Toxicology, Pharmaceutical Chemistry, Commerce, and other Arts & Science programs. Students register for PEY in their 2nd or 3rd year of study and complete their internship during the following academic year. For the current PEY 2012 - 2013 internship year, 740 students are in placements at over 200 companies. Some of our past out of province and international placement locations include:  Alberta, British Columbia, Newfoundland, Belgium, Chile, India, Japan, Taiwan, Switzerland, United States, China, Hong Kong, Finland, Singapore and Indonesia.  The average internship salary for 2012/2013 was $45,000.

ENGINEERING COMMUNICATION PROGRAM

DIRECTOR: Peter Weiss
The intent of the Engineering Communication Program is to integrate the development of communications skills into engineering curriculum through courses offered by the engineering departments and through the Program’s own credit and non-credit courses. It also operates the Engineering Communication Centre to help students with written and oral assignments. While Engineering Communication Centre tutors will not edit or correct documents, they will help in developing ideas and improving communication skills.

THE JEFFREY SKOLL BASC/MBA PROGRAM (SKOLL PROGRAM)

The Jeffrey Skoll Combined BASc/MBA Program allows qualified and selected students of the Faculty of Applied Science and Engineering (APSC) to complete both a BASc and an MBA degree nearlysimultaneously - and in a reduced time.
   The program genesis dates back to the mid-1990’s and clearly followed from the wide recognition that “engineering” and “management” provide an important combination of skills and understanding. The method to address this recognized need - having a combined program between the two cognizant faculties (the Faculty of Applied Science and Engineering and the Rotman School of Management) - is a well understood strategic goal, in particular given the highly competitive employment environment that pervades the market.
   Following an extensive review of the Skoll Program, a number of enhancements have been implemented to improve the overall student experience, provide stronger student services, and allow students to maintain a connection to each faculty as they complete their studies.
The Skoll Program application process remains unchanged:

The following are the current elements of the program:

These program elements allow students to:

PART-TIME STUDIES

All years of the BASc degree in Chemical, Civil, Computer, Electrical, Industrial, Materials, Mechanical and Mineral Engineering may be taken on a part-time basis (maximum of three courses per session).

First-year Students
First-year students who are registered on a full-time basis may request to transfer to part-time studies by the deadline indicated under the “Fall Sessional Dates”. Permission to make this transfer must be obtained from either the Chair, First Year or the Faculty Registrar. Transfers from part-time to full-time studies will normally be permitted only after completion of an entire program year (usually 10 courses).

Upper-year Students
Students who have completed first, second or third year as full-time students may apply to transfer to part-time studies by submitting a Transfer form by the deadline indicated under the “Winter Sessional Dates”.

Academic Program Load
A part-time student may enrol in a maximum of three one-session courses in each of the Fall Session, the Winter Session and the Summer Session with permission of the responsible Division or Department. Once enrolled in the part-time program, a student must complete all the courses for a program year over a minimum of two calendar years before requesting to continue studies on a full-time basis.
For example, a part-time student who requires ten courses to complete First Year may not proceed to Second Year after one year, i.e. the ten courses must be spread over a minimum of two years.
The selection of courses must satisfy the prerequisite and co-requisite structure specified in the course descriptions.
Students admitted with advanced standing who require the equivalent of at least 18 one-session courses to complete the requirements for a degree may register in a part-time program subject to the same conditions as other students. Students who require the equivalent of fewer than 18 one-session courses must attend on a full-time basis.

Promotion Regulations
Part-time students are governed by the promotion regulations described in Chapter 6.

Degree Requirements
To qualify for a degree, a student must complete a full undergraduate program within nine calendar years of first registration, exclusive of mandatory absences from their program.

INTERNATIONAL STUDENT EXCHANGES

Canadian exchanges for University of Toronto students. The Student Exchange Program offers students a variety of opportunities to study at partner institutions while gaining an understanding of different cultures, heritages, values and lifestyles found across borders.

Exchange programs operate under formal agreements between the University of Toronto and partner universities abroad and in Canada. University of Toronto students who participate in exchange programs will pay full-time tuition and compulsory incidental fees to the University of Toronto. Students can then study at one of the University of Toronto’s partner universities without paying tuition fees to the host university.

Please note that many of the universities in countries where English is not the host country’s official language still offer many, if not all, courses in English. Notable examples include universities in Hong Kong, Singapore, and Sweden.

Applications deadlines occur between December and February each year, depending on your program of choice.

EXCHANGE PATHWAYS

When considering going on exchange, one of the first decisions you will have to make is about the type of exchange pathway you will follow.  As an Applied Science and Engineering student, you have two pathways to choose between—the structured exchange pathway or the traditional non-structured exchange pathway.

The structured exchange pathway is pre-arranged between your department and the host institution. You will still have some choice in selecting your courses, but you will be doing so from a pre-approved course list. This option requires less academic planning on your part and simplifies the transfer credit process.

The traditional non-structured exchange pathway is one that you arrange yourself at any of CIE’s partner institutions. In choosing this option, you are able to design the exchange that is right for you. This option requires additional planning and discussion with your department to reduce the academic risk in terms of transfer credits. Many students follow non-structured exchange pathways to pursue minors in Arts & Science disciplines. See "Self-Initiated Minors" for more details.

CIE also offers two- to four-month international summer research opportunities for qualified students.

THE FOLLOWING EXCHANGE PROGRAMS ARE AVAILABLE THROUGH CIE:   

Australia
    Australian National University
    University of Adelaide
    University of Melbourne
    University of New South Wales
    University of Queensland
    University of Sydney
    University of Western Australia


Austria

   University of Graz


Barbados

    University of the West Indies (Cave Hill)


Brazil

   Universidade Estadual Paulista Júlio de Mesquita Filho (UNESP)
University of Sao Paulo

Canada
    McGill University
    University of British Columbia
   

China
    Beihang University
    Chinese University of Hong Kong
    Fudan University
    Hong Kong University of Science & Technology
    Peking University
    Shanghai Jiao Tong University
    Tianjin University
    Tsinghua University
    University of Hong Kong


The Czech Repbulic
    Masaryk University
   

Denmark
    University of Aarhus
   

England
    Herstmonceux Castle (CUSAP)
    King's College, London
    Lancaster University
    Loughborough University
    University College, London
    University of Birmingham
    University of Leeds
    University of Liverpool
    University of Manchester
    University of Nottingham
    University of Sheffield

Estonia
    University of Tartu
 

France
    Lyon 1 (Claude Bernard University)
    Ontario/Rhône-Alpes Program (ORA)


Germany
    DAAD Scholarship Program
    Humboldt University at Berlin
    Ontario/Baden-Würtemberg Program (OBW)
    University of Bonn
    University of Konstanz
    University of Stuttgart
    University of Ulm
    University of Mannheim


India
   India Institute of Technology, Kanpur
   Indian Institute of Technology, Bombay
   Ontario/Maharashtra-Goa Program


Ireland

   Trinity College, Dublin


Israel

   Technion-Israel Institute of Technology   


Italy

   University of Siena
   University of Pavia (civil engineering graduate students)


Jamaica
    University of the West Indies (Mona) 


Japan

    Keio University
    Kyoto University
    Nagoya University
    Nihon University
    Waseda University
    Osaka University
    University of Tokyo

Korea (South)
    Korea University
    Korean Advanced Institute of Science and Technology
    Seoul National University
    Yonsei University


Mexico

   Technical University of Monterrey (NARETI)
   University of Guadalajara (NARETI)


Netherlands
   Delft University of Technology


New Zealand
    University of Auckland
    University of Otago
   

Norway
    University of Oslo
   

Scotland
    University of Edinburgh
    University of Glasgow
    University of Strathclyde


Singapore
    Nanyang Technological University
    National University of Singapore
   

Sweden
    Lund University
    Uppsala University
   

Switzerland
    Swiss Federal Institute of Technology Zurich
   

Taiwan
    National Taiwan University
   

Thailand
   King Mongkut's University of Technology Thonburi

Trinidad and Tobago
    University of the West Indies (St. Augustine)
   

United States of America
   Killam Fellowships Program
   Marquette University (NARETI)
   University of Illinois at Chicago (NARETI)

 

 

 

 

 

 

DEGREE POSt (PROGRAM OF STUDY) CODES

The Faculty uses the following Degree POSt Codes to note which program a student is currently enrolled in.  Options within a program are categorized by a unique degree POSt code.  Full-time and part-time students will fall under one of these codes.  It is possible for students to change their degree POSt code during their time in the faculty.

POST CODE               DEGREE                 PROGRAM
AE NDEG   Non-Degree Special Student
AEENGBASC   Track One - General Engineering
AECHEBASC BASc Chemical Engineering
AECIVBASC BASc Civil Engineering
AECPEBASC BASc Computer Engineering
AEELEBASC BASc Electrical Engineering
AEESCBASE
AEESCBASEA
AEESCBASEB
AEESCBASEF

AEESCBASEI
AEESCBASEJ
AEESCBASEO
AEESCBASEP
AEESCBASER
AEESCBASET
BASc in Eng.Sci
BASc in Eng.Sci
BASc in Eng.Sci
BASc in Eng.Sci

BASc in Eng.Sci
BASc in Eng.Sci
BASc in Eng.Sci
BASc in Eng.Sci
BASc in Eng.Sci
BASc in Eng.Sci
Engineering Science
Engineering Science (Aerospace Engineering Option)
Engineering Science (Biomedical Option)
Engineering Science (Engineering Mathematics, Statistics and Finance)
Engineering Science (Infrastructure Engineering)
Engineering Science (Energy Systems Option)
Engineering Science (Nanoengineering)
Engineering Science (Physics)
Engineering Science (Electrical and Computer)
Engineering Science (Biomedical Systems Option)
AEINDBASC  BASc  Industrial Engineering 
AELMEBASC  BASc  Lassonde Mineral Engineering 
AEMECBASC  BASc  Mechanical Engineering 
AEMMSBASC  BASc  Materials Engineering 
AEMINBIO
AEMINBUS
AEMINENV
AEMINENR
AEMINRAM
  Minor in Biogengineering
Minor in Engineering Business
Minor in Environmental Engineering
Minor in Sustainable Energy
Minor in Robotics and Mechatronics

Minors in the Faculty of Applied Science and Engineering
Certificate Programs in the Faculty of Applied Science and Engineering
First Year
Aerospace Science and Engineering
Chemical Engineering and Applied Chemistry
Civil Engineering
Electrical and Computer Engineering
Engineering Science
Materials Science and Engineering
Mechanical and Industrial Engineering
Mineral Engineering

Minors in the Faculty of Applied Science and Engineering

Manager and Student Counsellor
Sharon Brown 
Cross-Disciplinary Programs Office
44 St. George St. 
416-978-3532
E-mail: cdp@ecf.utoronto.ca
www.minors.engineering.utoronto.ca  

Engineering Minors

Students wishing to pursue an  Engineering minor must take a minimum of six courses.

Completion of an Engineering Minor is subject to the following constraints:

  1. Students must ensure they meet the requirements of their chosen engineering-degree program or Option therein;
  2. Of the 6 (half year) courses required for the minor, one (half year) course can also be a core course in a student’s Program or Option, if applicable;
  3. Either a Thesis or Design course can count for up to two (half year) electives towards the 6 required courses IF the Thesis or Design course is strongly related to the subject area of the minor. This requires approval of the Director of the Minor;
  4. Availability of the courses to complete an engineering minor (including the foundational courses) for timetabling purposes is not guaranteed; the onus is on the student to ensure compatibility with their timetable;
  5. Students must secure approval from their home department before selecting any elective outside their home department.
MINOR IN BIOENGINEERING (AEMINBIO)

The Undergraduate Bioengineering Minor is a collaborative effort across the Faculty of Applied Science and Engineering and is open to Engineering students interested in learning more about biology and its application to engineering. Our definition of bioengineering is broad, reaching to all areas at the interface of engineering and biology. This includes bioprocess engineering, environmental microbiology, biomaterials, tissue engineering, bioelectricity, biomedical imaging, biomechanical engineering, nanotechnology related to medicine and the environment, and engineering design for human interfaces. All undergraduate Engineering students except students in the Engineering Science Biomedical Option are eligible to participate in this minor course of study.

Requirements for the Minor in Bioengineering

 The requirements for a Bioengineering Minor in the Faculty of Applied Science and Engineering are the successful completion of the following courses:

**Denotes courses available to Engineering Science students only

 1. CHE353H1 OR BME205H1**

 2. One of:

 i) CHE354H1 OR BME395H1**, or 
 ii) MIE331H1 OR BME350H1**

3.    Four (4) other electives from the list of Bioengineering designated courses or departmental thesis and design courses subject to the following constraints:


a.  Of the 6 (half year) bioengineering courses required, one (half year) course can also be a core course in a student’s Program, if applicable.
b.  Of the 4 elective courses, at least 2 must be from the Advanced category.
c.  Either a Thesis or Design course can count for up to two (half year) courses towards the 6 required courses IF the Thesis or Design course is strongly related to bioengineering.  This requires approval by the Bioengineering Minor Director.
d.  Some Departments may require students to select their electives from a pre-approved subset.  Please contact your Departmental Advisor for details.

e.  Arts and Science Courses listed below may be considered eligible electives for students taking the Bioengineering Minor (to be counted at a weight of 0.50 only), subject to the student meeting any prerequisite requirements. Students must also seek the approval of their home program to ensure that they meet their degree requirements. In situations where these courses don't meet those of their home program, students can elect to take these as extra courses.

Minor in Bioengineering

Courses Offered in the FallLect.Lab.Tut.Wgt.
Core Requirement Courses
Biomedical Systems Engineering I: Organ SystemsBME350H1F34-0.50
Engineering BiologyCHE353H1F3-10.50
Introductory Courses
Biomedical Systems Engineering I: Organ SystemsBME350H1F34-0.50
Organic Chemistry and BiochemistryCHE391H1F31.5010.50
Water and Wastewater Treatment ProcessesCIV342H1F31-0.50
General & Human GeneticsHMB265H1F2-10.50
Psychology For EngineersMIE242H1F33-0.50
Industrial Ergonomics and the WorkplaceMIE343H1F33-0.50
MSE440H1F/S/Y---0.00
Discovering Wood and its Role in Societal DevelopmentFOR308H1F3-10.50
Human Physiology IPSL300H1F3-10.50
Courses Offered in the WinterLect.Lab.Tut.Wgt.
Core Requirement Courses
Biomolecules and CellsBME205H1S21.7510.50
Physiological Control SystemsMIE331H1S3110.50
Introductory Courses
Biomedical Engineering Technology and InvestigationBME440H1S24-0.50
Introduction to Genes, Genetics & BiotechnologyHMB201H1S2-10.50
Physiological Control SystemsMIE331H1S3110.50
Biomechanics IMIE439H1S32-0.50
Introduction to Pharmacology and Pharmacokinetic PrinciplesPCL201H1S3-10.50

Minor in Bioengineering (continued)

Minor in Bioengineering (continued)Lect.Lab.Tut.Wgt.
Advanced Courses
BioinformaticsBCH441H1F2-10.50
Biomedical Systems Engineering II: Cells and TissuesBME395H1F3-20.50
Cellular and Molecular Bioengineering IIBME455H1F31.5010.50
Bioprocess EngineeringCHE466H1F30.6610.50
Chemical Properties of PolymersCHE562H1F3-10.50
Neural BioelectricityECE445H1F31.5010.50
Sensory CommunicationECE446H1F31.5010.50
BiocomputationECE448H1F3-20.50
Green Urban Infrastructure: Sustainable City ForestsFOR421H1F2--0.50
Introductory ImmunologyIMM334Y1Y2--0.50
Microbiology I: BacteriaMGY377H1F3--0.50
Engineering Psychology and Human PerformanceMIE448H1F33-0.50
Biotransport PhenomenaMIE520H1F3-10.50
Pharmacodynamic PrinciplesPCL302H1F3--0.50
Minor in Bioengineering (continued)Lect.Lab.Tut.Wgt.
Advanced Courses
Computational Systems BiologyBCB420H1S2-20.50
Regenerative MedicineBME510H1S4--0.50
Medical ImagingBME595H1S2310.50
Cellular and Molecular BiologyCHE354H1S3-20.50
Food EngineeringCHE462H1S3-10.50
Pulp and Paper ProcessesCHE564H1S3-10.50
Biocomposites: Mechanics and BioinspirationCHE475H1S3-10.50
Organic Materials ChemistryCHM446H1S2--0.50
Environmental BiotechnologyCIV541H1S3--0.50
Bioenergy and Biorefinery TechnologyFOR425H1S2-20.50
Innovation and Manufacturing of Sustainable MaterialsFOR424H1S3--0.50
Introductory ImmunologyIMM334Y1Y2--0.50
Healthcare SystemsMIE561H1S3-20.50
Biomaterials and BiocompatibilityMSE352H1S3-10.50
Surgical and Dental Implant DesignMSE442H1S3-10.50
Notes

1.  For those Engineering Science students who transferred into another program, BME105H1/BME205H1 can replace CHE353H1 and is an eligible prerequisite for CHE354H1 and MIE331H1.
2.  If a student takes both CHE354H1 and MIE331H1, one of these courses can be counted as one of the four electives.
3.  BME440H1 and BME455H1 are open to all students in the Faculty of Applied Science and Engineering, except those in Engineering Science, so long as the pre-requisites for each have been met.
4.  BME205H1, BME350H1, BME395H1, BME396H1, BME510H1, CHE391H1 and CHE393H1 are only open to Engineering Science Students.

MINOR IN ENVIRONMENTAL ENGINEERING (AEMINENV)

Students interested in learning more about ecology, sustainable design, risk assessment and environmental impact may be interested in this minor.  Our definition of environmental engineering is broad, reaching to all areas at the interface of engineering and the environment.  This includes ecology and ecological impacts, waste management, water and wastewater treatment, environmental microbiology, water resources engineering, hydrology, preventive engineering, life cycle analysis, design for the environment, and extends to the social and environmental impacts of technology.
All undergraduate Engineering students are eligible to participate in this minor course of study.

Course Requirements for the Minor in Environmental Engineering

The requirements for an Environmental Engineering Minor in the Faculty of Applied Science and Engineering are the successful completion of the following courses.

1.    Two (2) courses from the following:
       (If you take more than 2, the extra course may be able to count as an elective below)

i)  APS301H1
ii) CIV220H1
iii) CIV440H1
iv) CHE467H1

2.    Four (4) other electives from the list of Environmental Engineering designated courses or departmental thesis and design courses subject to the following constraints:

a.  Of the 6 (half year) environmental engineering courses required, one (half year) course can also be a core course in a student’s Program, if applicable.
b.  Of the 4 elective courses, at least 2 must be from the Advanced category.
c.  Either a Thesis or Design course can count for up to two (half year) courses towards the 6 required courses IF the Thesis or Design course is strongly related to environmental engineering.  This requires approval by the Environmental Engineering Minor Director.
d.  Some Departments may require students to select their electives from a pre-approved subset.  Please contact your Departmental Advisor for details.

e.  Arts and Science Courses listed below may be considered eligible electives for students taking the Environmental Engineering Minor, subject to the student meeting any prerequisite requirements. Students must also seek the approval of their home program to ensure that they meet their degree requirements. In situations where these courses don't meet those of their home program, students can elect to take these as extra courses.

Minor in Environmental Engineering

Courses Offered in the FallLect.Lab.Tut.Wgt.
Core Requirement Courses
Technology in Society and the Biosphere IAPS301H1F3-10.50
Environmental EngineeringCHE467H1F3-10.50
Urban Engineering EcologyCIV220H1F3-10.50
Introductory Courses
Environmental EngineeringCHE467H1F3-10.50
Chemistry of Environmental ChangeCHM210H1F2-10.50
Urban Engineering EcologyCIV220H1F3-10.50
Terrestrial Energy SystemsCIV300H1F3-20.50
Building ScienceCIV375H1F3120.50
Energy Policy and EnvironmentENV350H1F---0.50
Discovering Wood and its Role in Societal DevelopmentFOR308H1F3-10.50
Advanced Courses
Bioprocess EngineeringCHE466H1F30.6610.50
Aqueous Process EngineeringCHE565H1F3-10.50
Analytical Environmental ChemistryCHM410H1F24-0.50
Transport PlanningCIV531H1F3-10.50
Groundwater Flow and ContaminationCIV549H1F3-10.50
Water Resources EngineeringCIV550H1F3-20.50
Green Urban Infrastructure: Sustainable City ForestsFOR421H1F2--0.50
Alternative Energy SystemsMIE515H1F3-10.50
Mining Environmental ManagementMIN430H1F3-10.50
Extractive MetallurgyMSE504H1F3-20.50
Courses Offered in the WinterLect.Lab.Tut.Wgt.
Core Requirement Courses
Environmental Impact and Risk AssessmentCIV440H1S3-10.50
Introductory Courses
Environmental ChemistryCHE230H1S3-20.50
Environmental Pathways and Impact AssessmentCHE460H1S3-20.50
Environmental ChemistryCHM310H1S2--0.50
Hydraulics and HydrologyCIV250H1S31.5010.50
Terrestrial Energy SystemsCIV300H1S3-20.50
Environmental Impact and Risk AssessmentCIV440H1S3-10.50
Design for the EnvironmentMIE315H1S3-10.50
Environmental Degradation of MaterialsMSE315H1S3-20.50
Advanced Courses
Technology in Society and the Biosphere IIAPS302H1S3-10.50
Preventive Engineering and Social DevelopmentAPS304H1S3-10.50
Appropriate Technology & Design for Global DevelopmentAPS530H1S3--0.50
Pulp and Paper ProcessesCHE564H1S3-10.50
Topics in Atmospheric ChemistryCHM415H1S2--0.50
Environmental BiotechnologyCIV541H1S3--0.50
Sustainable BuildingsCIV576H1S3-10.50
Infrastructure for Sustainable CitiesCIV577H1S3-10.50
Innovation and Manufacturing of Sustainable MaterialsFOR424H1S3--0.50
MINOR IN SUSTAINABLE ENERGY (AEMINENR)

This minor is for students interested in learning more about energy, its sustainable use, energy demand management, and the public policy context in which energy use and production is regulated.  Our courses reach all areas of energy use, production, distribution, transmission, storage, and development.  This includes energy use and production for transportation, for space cooling and heating demands, and electrical production (from both alternative and conventional sources), energy distribution and storage, and extends to energy conservation, price, greenhouse gas production and control, and aspects of public policy.  Students in the Engineering Science Energy System Option are not allowed to take this minor.

Course Requirements for the Minor in Sustainable Energy

The requirements for a Sustainable Energy Minor in the Faculty of Applied Science and Engineering are the successful completion of the following courses:

1. CIV300H1

2. One of:
i) APS305H1 
ii) ENV350H1

3. Four (4) other electives from the list of Sustainable Energy designated courses or departmental thesis and design courses subject to the following constraints:

a. Of the 6 (half year) sustainable energy courses required, one (half year) course can also be a core course in a student’s Program, if applicable.
b. Of the 4 elective courses, at least 2 must be from the Advanced category.
c. Either a Thesis or Design course can count for up to two (half year) courses towards the 6 required courses IF the Thesis or Design course is strongly related to sustainable energy. This requires approval by the Sustainable Energy Minor Director.
d. Some Departments may require students to select their electives from a pre-approved subset. Please contact your Departmental Advisor for details.
e. Arts and Science Courses listed below may be considered eligible electives for students taking the Sustainable Energy Minor, subject to the student meeting any prerequisite requirements. Students must also seek the approval of their home program to ensure that they meet their degree requirements. In situations where these courses don't meet those of their home program, students can elect to take these as extra courses.

 

Minor in Sustainable Energy

Courses offered in the FallLect.Lab.Tut.Wgt.
Core Requirement Courses
Terrestrial Energy SystemsCIV300H1F3-20.50
Energy Policy and EnvironmentENV350H1F---0.50
Introductory Courses
Technology in Society and the Biosphere IAPS301H1F3-10.50
Defining Energy Futures in India and CanadaAPS310H0F31-0.50
Innovative Technologies and Organizations in Global Energy SystemsAPS510H1F3-10.50
Thermodynamics and Heat TransferCHE260H1F30.5010.50
Engineering ThermodynamicsCHE323H1F3-20.50
Environmental EngineeringCHE467H1F3-10.50
Building ScienceCIV375H1F3120.50
Fundamentals of Electrical Energy SystemsECE314H1F31.5010.50
Introduction to Energy SystemsECE349H1F31.5010.50
Efficient Use of Energy (formerly JGE347H1)GGR347H1F2-10.50
Advanced Courses
Introduction to Fusion EnergyAER507H1F3-10.50
Petroleum ProcessingCHE451H1F3-10.50
Introduction to Nuclear EngineeringCHE566H1F3-10.50
Transport PlanningCIV531H1F3-10.50
Introduction to Lighting SystemsECE510H1F3-20.50
Thermal Energy ConversionMIE411H1F33-0.50
Alternative Energy SystemsMIE515H1F3-10.50
Combustion and FuelsMIE516H1F3-10.50
Extractive MetallurgyMSE504H1F3-20.50
Courses Offered in the WinterLect.Lab.Tut.Wgt.
Core Requirement Courses
Terrestrial Energy SystemsCIV300H1S3-20.50
Energy PolicyAPS305H1S3-10.50
Introductory Courses
Environmental Impact and Risk AssessmentCIV440H1S3-10.50
Bioenergy from Sustainable Forest ManagementFOR310H1S2-10.50
Carbon-Free Energy (formerly JGE348H1)GGR348H1S2-10.50
ThermodynamicsMIE210H1S31.5010.50
Heat and Mass TransferMIE313H1S31.5020.50
Materials Processing and Sustainable DevelopmentMSE355H1S2-10.25
Physics of the EarthPHY395H1S2-10.50
Advanced Courses
Appropriate Technology & Design for Global DevelopmentAPS530H1S3--0.50
Fuel Cells and Electrochemical Conversion DevicesCHE469H1S3-10.50
Nuclear EngineeringCHE568H1S3-10.50
Sustainable BuildingsCIV576H1S3-10.50
Infrastructure for Sustainable CitiesCIV577H1S3-10.50
Energy Systems and Distributed GenerationECE413H1S31.5010.50
Power Electronics: Switch-Mode Power SuppliesECE533H1S3110.50
Bioenergy and Biorefinery TechnologyFOR425H1S2-20.50
Nuclear Reactor Theory and DesignMIE407H1S3-20.50
* Thermal and Machine Design of Nuclear Power ReactorsMIE408H1S3-20.50
Fuel Cell SystemsMIE517H1S3-10.50
Energy Management in Materials ProcessingMSE408H1S3-10.50
Nanotechnology in Alternate Energy SystemsMSE558H1S30.5010.50
MINOR IN ENGINEERING BUSINESS (AEMINBUS)

This minor is for students interested in learning more about the business dimension of engineering, from finance and economics to management and leadership.  Courses reach to areas of wealth production and creation, accounting, research and development, management, economics and entrepreneurship, all within a global context.  Students in the Engineering Science Mathematics, Statistics and Finance Option are not eligible to take this minor.

Course Requirements for the Minor in Engineering Business

The requirements for an Engineering Business Minor in the Faculty of Applied Science and Engineering are the successful completion of the following courses:

1.  Required Departmental Engineering Economics Course
(CHE249H1, CHE374H1, CME368H1, ECE472H1, MIE258H1)

2.  JRE300H1 - (CS Elecitve)

3.  JRE410H1 - (CS Elective)

4.  JRE420H1 - (CS Elective)

5.  Two (2) Course Electives from the list of Engineering Business designated courses.  A Departmental Thesis course may be counted as 1 elective (if an H course) or 2 electives (if a Y course) IF strongly related to Engineering Business.  This requires approval of the Director of the Minor.

Minor in Engineering Business

Courses offered in the FallLect.Lab.Tut.Wgt.
Engineering Economics Course
Engineering Economic AnalysisCHE249H1F3-10.50
Economic Analysis and Decision MakingCHE374H1F3-10.50
Engineering Economics and Decision MakingCME368H1F3-10.50
Engineering Economic Analysis & EntrepreneurshipECE472H1F3-20.50
Engineering Economics and AccountingMIE258H1F3-10.50
Required Courses
Fundamentals of Accounting and FinanceJRE300H1F/S3-10.50
Markets and Competitive StrategyJRE410H1F/S22-0.50
People Management and Organizational BehaviourJRE420H1F/S31-0.50
Elective Courses
Entrepreneurship and Small BusinessAPS234H1F4-10.50
Leadership and Leading for Groups and OrganizationsAPS443H1F2-20.50
Innovative Technologies and Organizations in Global Energy SystemsAPS510H1F3-10.50
Entrepreneurship and Business for EngineersECE488H1F3-20.50
Discovering Wood and its Role in Societal DevelopmentFOR308H1F3-10.50
Technology and ProsperityHPS308H1F2-10.50
Entrepreneurship and Business for EngineersMIE488H1F3-20.50
Entrepreneurship and Business for EngineersMSE488H1F3-20.50
Business Process EngineeringMIE354H1F3110.50
Courses offered in the WinterLect.Lab.Tut.Wgt.
Engineering Economics Course
Engineering Economic Analysis & EntrepreneurshipECE472H1S3-20.50
Required Courses
Fundamentals of Accounting and FinanceJRE300H1F/S3-10.50
Markets and Competitive StrategyJRE410H1F/S22-0.50
People Management and Organizational BehaviourJRE420H1F/S31-0.50
Elective Courses
Entrepreneurship and Business ManagementAPS432H1S4-10.50
Cognitive and Psychological Foundations of Effective LeadershipAPS442H1S3--0.50
Technology, Engineering and Global DevelopmentAPS520H1S3--0.50
Entrepreneurship and Business for EngineersCHE488H1S3-20.50
Entrepreneurship and Business for EngineersCIV488H1S3-20.50
The Spatial Organization of Economic ActivityGGR220H1S2-10.50
New Economic SpacesGGR221H1S2--0.50
Marketing GeographyGGR252H1S2-10.50
The Engineer in HistoryHPS283H1S2-10.50
MINOR IN ROBOTICS AND MECHATRONICS (AEMINRAM)

The Minor in Robotics and Mechatronics is a collaborative effort among The Edward S. Rogers Sr. Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering, the Institute for Aerospace Studies, and the Institute of Biomaterials and Biomedical Engineering. It is open to all students in the Faculty of Applied Science and Engineering who are interested in learning more about robotics and mechatronics. The minor in robotics and mechatronics exposes students to the fundamental paradigms, the enabling technologies, the design, and the applications of robotics and mechatronics. The program is intended to give a comprehensive view to these fields by drawing together relevant courses from all of the engineering departments. The emphasis is on giving the student a systems view rather than a narrowly focused study of one area. Courses examine the areas of sensing and actuation, control and signal processing, computer vision,intelligent algorithms, computation, and system integration. The minor prepares students for careers in industries that have a growing investment in automation, autonomy, and intelligent systems.  It is open to all students in the Faculty of Applied Science and Engineering.

Requirements for the Minor in Robotics and Mechatronics

The requirements for a Robotics and Mechatronics Minor in the Faculty of Applied Science and Engineering are the successful completion of the following courses:

1. One of:
(i) CHE322H1
(ii) ECE311H1
(iii) ECE356H1
(iv) MIE404H1
(v) AER372H1
(vi) BME344H1

2. One of:
(i) AER525H1
(ii) ECE470H1
(iii) MIE422H1
(iv) MIE443H1
(v) MIE444H1

3. Four (4) other electives from the list of robotics and mechatronics-designated courses or a departmental thesis or design course subject to the following contstraints:

a. Of the 6 (half year) courses required, one (half year) course can also be a core course in a student's Program, if applicable.
b. Of the four elective courses, at least two must be from the Advanced category.
c. A thesis course can count for up to two electives (2 HCEs) toward the six required Minor courses if the thesis is strongly related to robotics or mechatronics. This requires approval by the Director of the Minor.
d. Of the six Minor courses required, not all can have the same course prefix.

Introductory Courses

Fall CoursesLect.Lab.Tut.Wgt.
DynamicsAER301H1F3-10.50
Biomedical Systems Engineering I: Organ SystemsBME350H1F34-0.50
Communication SystemsECE316H1F31.5010.50
Algorithms and Data StructuresECE345H1F3-20.50
Kinematics and Dynamics of MachinesMIE301H1F3320.50
Winter CoursesLect.Lab.Tut.Wgt.
Communication SystemsECE316H1S31.5010.50
Algorithms and Data StructuresECE345H1S3-20.50
Systems SoftwareECE353H1S33-0.50
Foundations of ComputingECE358H1S3-10.50
Physiological Control SystemsMIE331H1S3110.50
Mechanical Engineering DesignMIE341H1S3310.50
Analog and Digital Electronics for MechatronicsMIE346H1S31.5010.50

Advanced Courses

Fall CoursesLect.Lab.Tut.Wgt.
Space Systems DesignAER407H1F-3-0.50
Introduction to Artificial IntelligenceCSC384H1F2-10.50
Machine Learning and Data MiningCSC411H1F2-10.50
Human-Computer InteractionCSC428H1F2-10.50
Control SystemsECE410H1F31.5010.50
Digital Signal ProcessingECE431H1F31.5010.50
Neural BioelectricityECE445H1F31.5010.50
Digital Signal ProcessingECE455H1F31.5010.50
Systems ControlECE557H1F31.5010.50
Machine DesignMIE442H1F31.5030.50
* Mechatronics PrinciplesMIE444H1F23-0.50
Minds and MachinesPHL342H1F3--0.50
Winter CoursesLect.Lab.Tut.Wgt.
Data-based Modelling for Prediction and ControlCHE507H1S3-10.50
Introduction to Artificial IntelligenceCSC384H1S2-10.50
Human-Computer InteractionCSC428H1S2-10.50
Real-Time Computer ControlECE411H1S31.5010.50
Digital Signal ProcessingECE431H1S31.5010.50
Intelligent Image ProcessingECE516H1S33-0.50
Digital Systems DesignECE532H1S33-0.50
Geometry of Curves and SurfacesMAT363H1S3--0.50
Microprocessors and Embedded MicrocontrollersMIE438H1S23-0.50
* Mechatronics Systems: Design and IntegrationMIE443H1S3310.50
* MEMS Design and MicrofabricationMIE506H1S31.5010.50
Notes

• Computer Science courses may have limited enrollment.
• Courses requiring special approval must be approved by the undergraduate Associate Chair of the student’s home department.

SELF-INITIATED MINORS

Students may be eligible to receive acknowledgement of an Arts and Science minor upon completion of its associated course requirements within specific disciplines (political science, cinema studies etc.). Information regarding minor requirements for each discipline may be found in the Arts and Science Calendar. A student must complete all requirements within nine calendar years of first registration, exclusive of mandatory absences from their program.

Students are advised that pursuing a self-initiated minor may extend their studies by a term or year in order to complete all program requirements.

Students must obtain documentation from the relevant department within the Faculty of Arts and Science so as to provide the Faculty with evidence that all requirements will have been completed. Successful completion will result in the annotation of the students’ transcripts as to the completion of the minor.

Students may use any of their HSS elective credits, any of their CS elective credits, any Free Electives credits and/or any 2 other courses (2 Half Course Equivalents) towards their Arts and Science Minor. All other courses taken for the Minor designation must be taken as Extra courses.
Students who have IB, AP, GCE, FB or CAPE credits may apply to the Engineering Registrar’s Office to have the Faculty of Arts and Science equivalent courses listed on their transcript as Extra courses; the course equivalencies are those in place at the time of first registration. These credits may be counted towards any Arts and Science degree designation and may be used as pre-requisites for any higher level course in the Faculty of Arts and Science.

Students wishing to pursue a Major or Specialist designation must apply to the Faculty of Arts and Science for admission for a 2nd degree.

Note: In some disciplines, the Faculty of Arts and Science has found it necessary to restrict enrolment in upper-level courses to their own students. Students planning to pursue minors should consultthe department concerned regarding the availability of courses.

Certificate Programs in the Faculty of Applied Science and Engineering

Certificate Programs in the Faculty of Applied Science and Engineering (AECERT)

Successful completion of an Engineering Certificate will be included on transcripts beginning in the 2012 - 2013 academic year.  Note that no course counted for degree credit, can be counted for more than one minor or certificate.

Engineering Business
  The Undergraduate Engineering Business Certificate is a collaborative effort across the Faculty of Applied Science and Engineering and the Rotman School of Management and is open to Engineering students interested in learning more about the business dimension of engineering, from finance and economics to management and leadership.  Courses focus on economics and accounting fundamentals, with a choice between marketing and strategy, management and organizational behaviour, or entrepreneurship.

The requirements of an Engineering Business Certificate in the Faculty of Applied Science and Engineering are the successful completion of the following courses:
  1) Required Departmental Engineering Economics Course (CHE249H1, CHE374H1, CME368H1, ECE472H1, MIE258H1)
  2) Two of: JRE300H1 - Foundations of Accounting and Finance (CS elective) OR
      JRE410H1 - Markets and Competitive Strategy (CS elective) OR
      JRE420H1 - People Management and Organizational Behaviour (CS elective) OR
      CHE488H1/CIV488H1/ECE488H1/MIE488H1/MSE488H1 - Entrepreneurship and Business for Engineers

Note:
Students may only receive credit on thier transcript for one of the Engineering Business Certificate or the Entrepreneurship Certificate, or the Engineering Business Minor.

Entrepreneurship, Innovation and Small Business
  Since the dawn of the industrial revolution, engineers have been amongst the most successful entrepreneurs, and this is especially true in today’s global economy. The enormous growth of the e-Economy has enabled many young people to be successful even earlier than the previous generation did. Wealth creation is a legitimate aspiration today and many of you will be successful in this endeavor. Furthermore, strategic uses of technology in all sorts of businesses make the difference between success and failure for these firms. The “entrepreneurial” spirit together with drive and persistency are requirements for success. Also, to participate effectively in this global economy, large and medium sized corporations are desperately seeking intrapreneurs, entrepreneurial individuals who prefer to work inside a larger firm rather than to start or run their own business.  Owning a business has many advantages. Entrepreneurs can control their own lives, structure their own progress, be accountable for their own success and can see the fruit of their labours in the wealth they create. After all, engineers are the most capable people to be in the forefront of this drive which will depend on the on-line e-Business environment fostered by the Internet and the Web in the new millennium. The development of these talents is addressed in a set of two courses but be forewarned that these courses require a substantial effort on the part of the student and the instructors. They are unusual in that, to be accepted into them, a student has to possess some of the prerequisite personality traits and some unique abilities required to become a successful entrepreneur. 
  Prior to being accepted into APS234H1, a short test is offered to those who believe that they have the drive and talents to start their own business. APS234H1 is available in the Fall semester in any but the first year of study. APS432H1 is offered in the Winter and can be taken in the same or a later year. The courses are sequential and the first is the pre-requisite of the second.

The following are the required certificate courses:
   APS234H1 Entrepreneurship and Small Business
   APS432H1 Entrepreneurship and Business Management
   Required Departmental Engineering Economics Course (CHE249H1, CHE374H1, CME368H1, ECE472H1, MIE258H1)

Note: Students may only receive credit on thier transcript for one of the Engineering Business Certificate or the Entrepreneurship Certificate, or the Engineering Business Minor.

Global Engineering
The Undergraduate Certificate in Global Engineering is open to Engineering students interested in developing their knowledge of global issues and how engineers can influence and improve conditions around the world.  The courses focus on a variety of concepts such as effects of emerging and appropriate technologies in both developed and developing economies, global energy systems, innovative finance techniques, current theories in international development and foreign aid.  All undergraduate Engineering students are eligible to participate in this minor course of study.

The requirements for a Global Engineering Certificate in the Faculty of Applied Science and Engineering are the successful completion of the following courses:
  1) Two of:
       APS510H1 - Technologies and Organizations in Global Energy Systems (CS elective)
       APS520H1 - Technology, Engineering and Global Development (HSS elective, as of 2011-2012)
       APS530H1 - Appropriate Technology and Design for Global Development
  2) One elective from the following courses:
       ANT204H1 - Anthropology of the Contemporary World (HSS elective)
       ENV333H1 - Ecological Worldviews (HSS elective)
       GGR216H1 - Global Cities (HSS elective)
       JGI216H1 - Urbanization & Global Change (HSS elective)

Note: If a student is pursuing both the Global Engineering Certificate and either the Sustainable Energy Minor or the Environmental Engineering Minor, the courses listed above can only be counted towards either the certificate or the minor, not both.

Preventive Engineering and Social Development
The Certificate in Preventive Engineering and Social Development is designed to help future engineers become as socially and environmentally literate as they are technically competent by enabling them to anticipate the consequences of their design and decision-making and to apply this knowledge in a negative-feedback mode to prevent or greatly reduce undesired and harmful effects on human life, society and the biosphere. The results of such a preventive orientation are, almost always, much more cost-effective than their conventional counterparts. Studies of the career paths of engineers show that they quickly move into administrative and managerial functions for which a broader perspective is required. An understanding of how technology interacts with human life, society and the biosphere (the ecology of technology) is essential to complement their understanding of how the inputs of materials, labour, knowledge and capital are converted to desired outputs (the economy of technology).

The requirements for the elective sequence are: APS301H1, APS302H1 and APS304H1.  
 Students who successfully complete these three courses are eligible for the Certificate. For further information, please refer to the description of the Centre for Technology and Social Development in  this Calendar. Students should register for this elective sequence when they begin the third course.

Mineral Resources
The Lassonde Institute of Mining is an interdisciplinary research institute within the University of Toronto created to be at the forefront of leading edge research in the whole spectrum of mining activities, ranging from mineral resource identification, through mine planning and excavation, to extraction and processing. There is a real demand for qualified professionals in all engineering sectors (electrical, mechanical, materials, chemical, civil, environmental, etc.) to be integrated into the mining sectors. The proposed Mineral Resources Certificate aims to provide an exposure to the mineral resources sector of interested candidates. It further aims to bring closer together Lassonde Mineral Engineering students with other students and provides a window to state of the art research in mining.
Students in all disciplines except the Lassonde Mineral Engineering Program are eligible to participate in this Certificate.

Note:  All three courses are technical courses, not CS or HSS.  Students may take these as either a Free Elective or as a Technical Elective with the approval of their home department.

Students will receive the Mineral Resources Certificate upon completion of the following three courses as outlined below:
1)    MIN225H1 F - Introduction to the Resource Industries
2)    MIN250H1 S - Surface Mining 
3)    MIN351H1 S - Underground Mining

Special Consideration: Some students undertake significant experiences, such as internships, and arguably learn more about mineral resource engineering during those placements than in a typical course. On a case-by-case basis, the LMEP office will permit such placements to replace a course in fulfilling the requirements of the Mineral Resources Certificate. In all cases when such an exception is to be made, a major report documenting the student’s activities, duties, learnings, and reflections during the placement will be required. The final decision for the acceptability of this experience requirement will be made through the LMEP Programs Office.

Nuclear Engineering
Nuclear energy constitutes an important component of the energy mix in most national energy strategies, and its proportion will likely increase in response to growing challenges related to fossil-driven climate change. Modular nuclear systems power space craft and remote sites on earth. Future nuclear power systems will address current concerns regarding safety and the environment, and significant breakthroughs are likely in fusion technology.  This certificate provides recognition for an interdisciplinary focus on nuclear systems.

The requirements for a Nuclear Engineering Certificate in the Faculty of Applied Science and Engineering are the successful completion of the following courses:

1) CHE566H1 F     Introduction to Nuclear Engineering
2) Two of:   MIE407H1 S     Nuclear Reactor Theory and Design   
MIE408H1 S     Thermal and Mechanical Design of Nuclear Power Reactors
CHE568H1 S     Nuclear Plant Engineering
AER507H1 F     Introduction to Fusion Energy

Note: If a student is pursuing both the Nuclear Engineering Certificate and the Sustainable Energy Minor, the courses listed above can only be counted towards either the certificate or the minor, not both.

Program and Course Approvals
Students must obtain the approval of their department for their course selection and, in selecting elective courses, and must also conform to any enrolment requirements set by the department offering the course.

First Year

CHAIR, FIRST YEAR
Senior Lecturer Micah Stickel, B.A.Sc., M.A.Sc., Ph.D.
 
ASSISTANT REGISTRAR, FIRST YEAR
Leslie Grife, B.A. (Hons)

STUDENT SUCCESS SPECIALIST
Curtis Norman, B.A. (Hons), M.Ed.

FIRST YEAR ADVISOR
Darcy McKenzie, B.A. (Hons), M.Ed.

FIRST YEAR ASSISTANT
Vanessa Andres, B.A. (Hons), M.I.

Room 170, Galbraith Building
416-978-4625, firstyear@ecf.utoronto.ca
www.firstyear.engineering.utoronto.ca

   The first-year Engineering curriculum is designed for students continuing in one of the following programs in second year: Chemical, Civil, Computer, Electrical, Industrial, Materials, Mechanical or Mineral Engineering. Students are admitted to one of these programs or TrackOne on entering first year. This guarantees a place in a program in subsequent years, subject to maintenance of satisfactory standing. Students who complete first year with a clear record in one of the above programs may request to transfer to another program (see Academic Regulations for details). Students in TrackOne or who wish to transfer at the end of first year must submit their requests to the First Year Office no later than the deadline as listed in the Sessional Dates. 
   The academic year consists of two sessions, Fall (September through December) and Winter (January through April). Students typically take five courses per session. Timetables, detailing which courses students will take in each session, will be provided to students in August.  The first-year curriculum is shown in each program section, with the TrackOne General Engineering first-year curriculum shown below:

TrackOne- GENERAL FIRST YEAR ENGINEERING COURSE (AEENGBASC)

TrackOne is the general First Year curriculum of the Faculty.  Students admitted to this program transfer to one of eight Engineering Programs, including Chemical, Civil, Computer, Electrical, Industrial, Mechanical, Mineral, or Materials Science Engineering, after the successful completion of the First Year curriculum, as listed below.

FIRST YEAR - TrackOne

Fall Session - Year 1Lect.Lab.Tut.Wgt.
Computer FundamentalsAPS105H1F3210.50
Engineering Strategies & Practice IAPS111H1F3110.50
Ethics in EngineeringAPS150H1F--10.05
MechanicsCIV100H1F3-20.50
Linear AlgebraMAT188H1F3-10.50
Calculus AMAT196H1F3-10.50
Winter Session - Year 1Lect.Lab.Tut.Wgt.
Introduction to Materials and ChemistryAPS104H1S30.5010.50
Engineering Strategies & Practice IIAPS112H1S32-0.50
Introduction to EngineeringAPS191H1S1--0.15
Electrical FundamentalsECE110H1S3120.50
Calculus BMAT197H1S3-10.50
DynamicsMIE100H1S3-20.50
T-PROGRAM IN FIRST YEAR

The T-Program enables students in First Year who have been placed on probation after the Fall Session to immediately repeat a maximum of three courses and defer up to three Winter Session courses to the Summer Session (May and June).  Full-time students must carry five courses during the Winter Session.
These five Fall Session courses are offered again in the Winter Session. Normally they are only open to T-Program students and to other students required to immediately repeat the course.
   APS105  Computer Fundamentals                                MAT186  Calculus I    
   APS111  Engineering Strategies & Practice I              MAT188   Linear Algebra
   CIV100   Mechanics

Students who must repeat MSE101 or CHE112 will enrol in one of the sections offered in the Winter Session, if scheduling permits.

The courses offered in the Summer Session are:
   APS106  Fundamentals of Computer Programming      MAT187  Calculus II
   APS112 Engineering Strategies & Practice II              MIE100 Dynamics
   ECE110  Electrical Fundamentals                                 MSE101 Materials Science
         
Courses to be dropped from the Winter Session and courses to be taken in the Summer Session will depend on the student’s program of study and will be decided by the First Year Office.
For details regarding the T-Program Promotional Regulations, please see the Academic Regulations portion of the calendar.

Aerospace Science and Engineering

UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAM IN AEROSPACE SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING

The University of Toronto offers a comprehensive program of study in Aerospace Science and Engineering at both the undergraduate and graduate levels. The undergraduate program is offered through the Division of Engineering Science, while the graduate program is offered at the University of Toronto Institute for Aerospace Studies (UTIAS).  All Engineering Science students follow a common curriculum during the first two years, with emphasis on mathematics, science, and engineering fundamentals. The final two years in the Aerospace Option focus on aeronautics and space engineering, with courses delivered primarily by faculty from UTIAS.
 The undergraduate aerospace curriculum reflects the diverse and dynamic activities associated with the aerospace industry in Canada and abroad. Students are exposed to courses associated with aeronautical and space sciences and engineering, and also gain practical experience in laboratory and design courses. Capstone design courses in fourth year include Space Systems Design, where student teams design hardware associated with a space mission, such as a Hubble telescope repair mission, or a Europa landing probe. Engineers from MDA Space Missions play a major role in the delivery of this course. In the Aircraft Design course, student teams design and build model aircraft with various configurations, which are then flown in a fly-off competition at the end of the term.
 The aerospace field has progressed extensively since the record-setting flights by F.W. Baldwin and J.A.D. McCurdy - both University of Toronto engineering graduates - during the early 1900s. It has evolved into a multi-disciplinary activity that finds itself at the cutting edge of high technology research and development. Consequently, the field is rich with technological and engineering challenges in diverse areas such as hypersonic aerodynamics, multi-disciplinary optimization, and space exploration. Students at the fourth year level will have opportunities to select courses and work on thesis projects related to the many specialized areas of active research at UTIAS.
 While the undergraduate program prepares students for immediate entry into a professional engineering career, many students continue to the graduate level in order to enhance their qualifications and employment opportunities.
 For further information regarding undergraduate aerospace studies please refer to the Engineering Science program in this Calendar, the website www.engsci.utoronto.ca or contact the Engineering Science Administrative Office at 416-978-2903.

GRADUATE PROGRAM IN AEROSPACE SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING

UTIAS offers graduate programs leading to research intensive M.A.Sc., and Ph.D. degrees and a professionally oriented M.Eng. degree. Graduate research areas include aircraft flight systems and control, flight simulation, computational fluid dynamics, combustion and propulsion, aerodynamic shape optimization, experimental fluid dynamics, flow control, structural mechanics, advanced composite materials, multidisciplinary optimization of aircraft, multifunctional systems, spacecraft dynamics and control, autonomous space robotics, microsatellites, space mechatronics, plasma-materials interactions and materials for fusion reactors. Details of entrance regulations and courses of study are given in the calendar of the School of Graduate Studies and on the website www.utias.utoronto.ca.
 It should be noted that a student who has graduated in another branch of engineering, mathematics, physics or chemistry, and wishes to pursue graduate work at the Institute for Aerospace Studies, may be admitted to the graduate program. In that case the courses leading to the M.A.Sc. or M.Eng. degree will be arranged on an individual basis to make up for deficiencies in undergraduate training.

Chemical Engineering and Applied Chemistry

UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAM IN CHEMICAL ENGINEERING (AECHEBASC)

Undergraduate Student Counsellor
Ms Jane Park
Room 216A, Wallberg Building, 416-978-5336
Email: ugrad.chemeng@utoronto.ca

Chemical Engineering is that primary engineering discipline based on the fundamental sciences of chemistry, physics, biochemistry and mathematics, in which processes are conceived, designed and operated to effect compositional changes in materials of all kinds.  Chemical engineers play an important role in the development of a healthier environment and safer and healthier industrial workplaces. They develop new industrial processes that are more energy-efficient and environmentally friendly and create products that improve the quality of life. They are responsible for improvements in technologies and in evaluating and controlling hazards.  In addition to the basic sciences, chemical engineers use a well-defined body of knowledge in the application of the conservation laws which determine mass flow and energy relations; thermodynamics and kinetics which determine whether reactions are feasible and the rate at which they occur; and the chemical engineering rate laws which determine limits to the transfer of heat, mass and momentum. Graduating chemical engineers are skilled problem solvers.  A strong background in applied chemistry furnishes the chemical engineer with the knowledge to participate in the broadest range of engineering activities, and indeed to pursue other professional careers in management, medicine, law, teaching and government. Instruction in important aspects of economic analysis is also included.  In the Fall Session of Fourth Year, students participate in small teams in either the design of a chemical plant. 4th year students may undertake an individual full year research project. This project, the culmination of which is a thesis, serves in many cases as an introduction to research, and provides an opportunity to apply the principles developed during the first three years of the program to problems of engineering interest. A thesis project may, for example, concern an experimental laboratory investigation, the design of a process, or a computer study of a complex chemical system.

The Technical Elective subjects available in the Third and Fourth Years cover a wide range of fundamental and application areas of Chemical Engineering and Applied Chemistry. By choosing electives from a restricted list, it is possible for students to complete the requirements for an Engineering Minor. A minor signifies that a student has gained an enhanced understanding of a specific field of study. For more information on the various Minors, please see the sections of the Calendar relating to these programs

First Year Chemical Engineering

Fall Session - Year 1Lect.Lab.Tut.Wgt.
Engineering Strategies & Practice IAPS111H1F3110.50
Ethics in EngineeringAPS150H1F--10.05
Physical ChemistryCHE112H1F3110.50
MechanicsCIV100H1F3-20.50
Calculus IMAT186H1F3-10.50
Linear AlgebraMAT188H1F3-10.50
Winter Session - Year 1Lect.Lab.Tut.Wgt.
Fundamentals of Computer ProgrammingAPS106H1S3210.50
Engineering Strategies & Practice IIAPS112H1S32-0.50
Concepts in Chemical EngineeringCHE113H1S3130.50
Calculus IIMAT187H1S3-10.50
Introduction to Materials ScienceMSE101H1S3310.50

Second Year Chemical Engineering

Fall Session - Year 2Lect.Lab.Tut.Wgt.
Applied Chemistry III - LaboratoryCHE204H1Y-6-0.50
Process EngineeringCHE208H1F3-20.50
Fluid MechanicsCHE211H1F3-20.50
Applied Chemistry I - Inorganic ChemistryCHE220H1F3-10.50
Calculus and Numerical MethodsCHE221H1F3220.50
Engineering Economic AnalysisCHE249H1F3-10.50
Seminar Course: Communications Portfolio ICHE297Y1Y--0.250.00
CommunicationCHE298H1F--20.25
Winter Session - Year 2Lect.Lab.Tut.Wgt.
Applied Chemistry III - LaboratoryCHE204H1Y-6-0.50
Heat and Mass TransferCHE210H1S3-20.50
Applied Chemistry II - Organic ChemistryCHE213H1S3-10.50
Applied Differential EquationsCHE222H1S3-20.50
StatisticsCHE223H1S3-10.50
Environmental ChemistryCHE230H1S3-20.50
Seminar Course: Communications Portfolio ICHE297Y1Y--0.250.00

Practical Experience Requirement

 

PROFESSIONAL EXPERIENCE YEAR

Students registered within this program, and all other undergraduate programs within the Faculty of Applied Science and Engineering, may elect to enroll and participate in the Professional Experience Year (PEY) program. The PEY program requires that qualified students undertake a paid, full-time 12-16 month continuous work period with a cooperating industry. Details are described in the beginning of this chapter. For more information, consult the Professional Experience Year Office, 45 Willcocks Street 2nd Floor early in session 2F or 3F.

Third Year Chemical Engineering

Fall Session - Year 3Lect.Lab.Tut.Wgt.
Engineering ThermodynamicsCHE323H1F3-20.50
Process DesignCHE324H1F3420.75
Thermodynamics and Kinetics LaboratoryCHE326H1F-4-0.25
Reaction KineticsCHE332H1F3-20.50
Technical ElectiveF 0.50
Complementary Studies/Humanities and Social Sciences ElectiveF 0.50
Winter Session - Year 3Lect.Lab.Tut.Wgt.
Separation ProcessesCHE311H1S3420.75
Process Dynamics and ControlCHE322H1S30.2520.50
Chemical Reaction EngineeringCHE333H1S3-20.50
Team Strategies for Engineering DesignCHE334H1S1-20.25
and one of:
Technical ElectiveS 0.50
Complementary Studies/Humanities and Social Sciences ElectiveS 0.50

1 In years 3 and 4, two of the four Complementary Studies/Humanities and Social Sciences elective courses must be from the Humanities and Social Sciences category. Students may take their Complementary Studies/Humanities and Social Sciences electives in any order in years 3 and 4.

Fourth Year Chemical Engineering

Fall Session - Year 4Lect.Lab.Tut.Wgt.
Engineering MaterialsCHE341H1F3-10.50
Chemical Plant DesignCHE430Y1F2-61.00
Complementary Studies/Humanities and Social Sciences Elective2F 0.50
and one of:
ThesisCHE499Y1Y-7-1.00
Technical Elective1F 0.50
Winter Session - Year 4Lect.Lab.Tut.Wgt.
Professional PracticeCHE403H1S2--0.00
Technical Elective1S 0.50
Technical Elective1S 0.50
Free ElectiveS 0.50
Complementary Studies/Humanities and Social Sciences Elective2S 0.50
and one of:
ThesisCHE499Y1Y-7-1.00
Technical Elective1S 0.50

1 See below for the list of eligible technical electives.
2 In years 3 and 4, two of the four Complementary Studies/Humanities and Social Sciences elective courses must be from the Humanities and Social Sciences category. Students may take their Complementary Studies/Humanities and Social Sciences electives in any order in years 3 and 4.
3In years 3 and 4, students must complete a total of 5 Technical Electives (or 3 Technical Electives plus CHE499Y1), one free elective and 4 HSS/CS electives
4 Some programs require students to take a Free Elective. A Free Elective has few restrictions: any degree credit course listed in the current calendars of the Faculty of Applied Science and Engineering, the Faculty of Arts and Science, and the School of Graduate Studies is acceptable as a Free Elective provided it does not duplicate material covered in courses taken or to be taken.

THESIS

CHE499Y1Y Thesis
Full-year (Fall and Winter Sessions) thesis requires approval of the department and research project supervisor.

TECHNICAL ELECTIVES

Students are required to select their technical electives from the list of approved courses below.  Technical Electives outside the group of courses below must first be approved by the Chemical Engineering UG Coordinator.

Students wishing to pursue an Engineering Minor should take their core courses as technical electives in terms 3F and 3S. The organization of the minors and the sets of eligible electives are presented below.

Technical Electives

Fall Session - Year 4Lect.Lab.Tut.Wgt.
Cellular and Molecular Bioengineering IIBME455H1F31.5010.50
Engineering BiologyCHE353H1F3-10.50
Petroleum ProcessingCHE451H1F3-10.50
Bioprocess EngineeringCHE466H1F30.6610.50
Environmental EngineeringCHE467H1F3-10.50
Special Topics in Chemical EngineeringCHE470H1F3-10.50
Chemical Properties of PolymersCHE562H1F3-10.50
Aqueous Process EngineeringCHE565H1F3-10.50
Introduction to Nuclear EngineeringCHE566H1F3-10.50
Terrestrial Energy SystemsCIV300H1F3-20.50
Water and Wastewater Treatment ProcessesCIV342H1F31-0.50
Building ScienceCIV375H1F3120.50
Groundwater Flow and ContaminationCIV549H1F3-10.50
Water Resources EngineeringCIV550H1F3-20.50
Alternative Energy SystemsMIE515H1F3-10.50
Combustion and FuelsMIE516H1F3-10.50
Introduction to Polymer EngineeringMSE330H1F3-10.50
Biomaterial Processing and PropertiesMSE440H1F3-10.50
Winter Session - Year 4Lect.Lab.Tut.Wgt.
Biomedical Engineering Technology and InvestigationBME440H1S24-0.50
Cellular and Molecular BiologyCHE354H1S3-20.50
Advanced Reactor DesignCHE412H1S3-10.50
Environmental Pathways and Impact AssessmentCHE460H1S3-20.50
Food EngineeringCHE462H1S3-10.50
Fuel Cells and Electrochemical Conversion DevicesCHE469H1S3-10.50
Special Topics in Chemical EngineeringCHE470H1S3-10.50
Modelling in Biological and Chemical SystemsCHE471H1S3-10.50
Biocomposites: Mechanics and BioinspirationCHE475H1S3-10.50
Data-based Modelling for Prediction and ControlCHE507H1S3-10.50
Risk Based Safety ManagementCHE561H1S3-10.50
Pulp and Paper ProcessesCHE564H1S3-10.50
Nuclear EngineeringCHE568H1S3-10.50
Topics in Atmospheric ChemistryCHM415H1S2--0.50
Hydraulics and HydrologyCIV250H1S31.5010.50
Terrestrial Energy SystemsCIV300H1S3-20.50
Environmental Impact and Risk AssessmentCIV440H1S3-10.50
Bioenergy from Sustainable Forest ManagementFOR310H1S2-10.50
Innovation and Manufacturing of Sustainable MaterialsFOR424H1S3--0.50
Bioenergy and Biorefinery TechnologyFOR425H1S2-20.50
Physiological Control SystemsMIE331H1S3110.50
Quality Control and ImprovementMIE364H1S3120.50
Fuel Cell SystemsMIE517H1S3-10.50
ENGINEERING MINOR ELIGIBLE COURSES

Students interested in pursuing an Engineering Minor (six courses) will find detailed information at the beginning of this chapter. By selecting courses that meet the requirements of both the Chemical Engineering Program and the respective minor, it is possible for a student to complete the minor during the normal course of study. If a student chooses to undertake a thesis within the area of an engineering minor, it may count for 2 of the six required credits. Students wishing to select engineering minor eligible courses that are not in the table of approved courses below, must take those courses as Extra courses for degree purposes.

 

  Bioengineering Minor Environmental Engineering Minor Sustainable Energy Minor
Core Elective CHE353H1 APS301H1 CIV300H1
2nd Core Elective CHE354H1 or MIE331H1 CIV440H1 or CHE467H1 APS305H1 or ENV350H1
Eligible Technical Elective

CHE462H1
CHE466H1
CHE475H1
CHE564H1
BME440H1 or BME340H1
BME455H1
FOR410H1
FOR424H1
MSE440H1

CHE460H1
CHE466H1
CIV440H1
CHE467H1
CHE564H1
CHE565H1
CIV300H1
CIV342H1
CIV375H1
CIV549H1
CIV550H1
CHM415H1
FOR424H1
MIE515H1

CIV440H1
CIV375H1
CHE451H1
CHE467H1
CHE469H1 or MIE517H1
CHE568H1
FOR310H1
FOR410H1
GGR348H1
MIE516H1
MIE515H1

GRADUATE PROGRAMS IN CHEMICAL ENGINEERING

The Department of Chemical Engineering and Applied Chemistry, provides exciting opportunities for students who would like to pursue advanced studies beyond the undergraduate level toward the M.Eng., M.A.Sc. or Ph.D. degrees. More than 20 graduate level courses toward the study requirement of the degree programs are offered by the Department.  Financial support is provided to graduate students through research grants and/or fellowships, together with some undergraduate teaching in the laboratories.  Undergraduate students interested in postgraduate programs are invited to discuss research activities and graduate studies in the Department with any member of staff at any stage of their undergraduate program. Further information may also be obtained from the Coordinator of Graduate Studies, Department of Chemical Engineering and Applied Chemistry, Room 212, Wallberg Building and from the Calendar of the School of Graduate Studies.

Civil Engineering

UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAM IN CIVIL ENGINEERING (AECIVBASC)

UNDERGRADUATE STUDENT COUNSELLORS:
Ms. Shayni Clarke
Room GB105, Galbraith Building, (416) 978-5905
E-mail: shayni@civ.utoronto.ca

Mr. Colin Anderson
Room GB105, Galbraith Building, (416) 978-0945
E-mail: colin@civ.utoronto.ca

UNDERGRADUATE STUDENT ADVISORS:
Prof. Shamim Sheikh
Associate Chair, Academic

Ms. Nelly Pietropaolo
Room GB105, Galbraith Building

 

   Civil Engineering exists at the intersection of the human, built, and natural environments. Civil Engineers have historically been the professionals leading the design, construction, maintenance and eventual decommissioning of society's physical infrastructure, including: transportation networks, water supply and wastewater treatment systems, the structures for energy generation and distribution systems, buildings and other constructed works, land and water remediation, and more.

   Although civil engineering is a highly technical profession, responsible engineering today also requires that engineers understand the impact of their decisions and their constructed works on society at large, including issues of environmental stewardship and life-cycle economic responsibility. For example, significant proportions of the world's energy and raw materials production goes into the construction and operations of our buildings and transportation systems. Civil Engineers have a significant role to play in making these systems more sustainable for future generations. The undergraduate program is therefore designed to complement technical training with learning opportunities that address these challenges.

   Students enhance their undergraduate experience through a number of enriched programs. The undergraduate courses have been deliberately sequenced so that students can take advantage of the Minors in Bioengineering, Environmental Engineering or Sustainable Energy; the Certificate Programs in Preventative Engineering and Social Development or in Entrepreneurship, Innovation and Small Business; co-op work opportunities through the Professional Experience Year Internship Program; and post-graduate academic opportunities through the Jeffrey Skoll BASc/MBA Program or through fast-tracked Master's degree programs.

FIRST YEAR CIVIL ENGINEERING

Fall Session - Year 1Lect.Lab.Tut.Wgt.
Engineering Strategies & Practice IAPS111H1F3110.50
Ethics in EngineeringAPS150H1F--10.05
Physical ChemistryCHE112H1F3110.50
MechanicsCIV100H1F3-20.50
Calculus IMAT186H1F3-10.50
Linear AlgebraMAT188H1F3-10.50
Winter Session - Year 1Lect.Lab.Tut.Wgt.
Fundamentals of Computer ProgrammingAPS106H1S3210.50
Engineering Strategies & Practice IIAPS112H1S32-0.50
Earth Systems ScienceCME185H1S3210.50
Calculus IIMAT187H1S3-10.50
Introduction to Materials ScienceMSE101H1S3110.50
PERSONAL PROTECTIVE EQUIPMENT

Starting with CIV201H1 - Introduction to Civil Engineering, there will be many occasions where students are required to use personal protective equipment (PPE) including safety footwear bearing the CSA Green Patch, hard hats, protective eyewear with side shields, tear-away safety vests, and ear protection.  Students are required to purchase their own PPE.  All field trips, laboratories, and other events require advance briefing on the nature of the potential hazards and students are required to attend these briefings and to follow the provided instructions.

PRACTICAL EXPERIENCE REQUIREMENT

Students are required to have completed a total of 600 hours of acceptable practical experience before graduation (normally during their summer vacation periods).  Satisfactory completion of CME358H1 - Survey CAMP (Civil and Mineral Practicals), will contribute 100 hours towards this requirement.  Satisfactory completion of the Professional Experience Year (PEY) will also completely fulfill the Practical Experience Requirement.


SECOND YEAR CIVIL ENGINEERING

Fall Session - Year 2Lect.Lab.Tut.Wgt.
Technology in Society and the Biosphere IAPS301H1F3-10.50
Introduction to Civil EngineeringCIV201H1F---0.20
Urban Engineering EcologyCIV220H1F3-10.50
Management of ConstructionCIV280H1F3-20.50
Engineering Communications ICIV282H1F1-10.20
Solid Mechanics ICME210H1F31.501.500.50
Engineering Mathematics ICME261H1F3110.50
Fluid Mechanics ICME270H1F31.5010.50
Winter Session - Year 2Lect.Lab.Tut.Wgt.
Civil Engineering MaterialsCIV209H1S3220.50
Structural Analysis ICIV214H1S3-20.50
Civil Engineering GraphicsCIV235H1S-6-0.50
Hydraulics and HydrologyCIV250H1S31.5010.50
Probability Theory for Civil and Mineral EngineersCME263H1S3-20.50
Complementary Studies Elective (CS)/ Humanities And Social Sciences Elective (HSS)S/Y 0.50

   CIV201H1 - Introduction to Civil Engineering, is a three-day field-based course.  The course will be held immediately after Labour Day.  Students are required to bring and wear their Personal Protective Equipment.  The results of this course are used in computing the student's Second Year Fall Session average.  An extra fee is charged to cover a transportation fee and accommodation.
   Students are required to complete 4 half-courses of CS/HSS, at least two of which must be HSS, before graduation.  The core course APS301H1 - Technology in Society and the Biosphere I, counts as one half-course towards this requirement.  Note that valid HSS courses are more restrictive in scope than are CS courses.  A list of pre-approved CS and HSS courses can be found on the Registrar's website.

   Successful completion of APS302H1 - Technology and Society in the Biosphere II and APS304H1 - Preventive Engineering and Social Development, both HSS electives, will satisfy the requirements for the Certificate Program in Preventative Engineering and Social Development.

THIRD YEAR CIVIL ENGINEERING

Fall Session - Year 3Lect.Lab.Tut.Wgt.
Steel and Timber DesignCIV312H1F3-20.50
Transport I - Introduction to Urban Transportation SystemsCIV331H1F3-10.50
Water and Wastewater Treatment ProcessesCIV342H1F31-0.50
Building ScienceCIV375H1F3120.50
Civil Engineering Communication PortfolioCIV382Y1Y--0.250.00
Geotechnical Engineering ICME321H1F30.5010.50
Survey CAMP (Civil and Mineral Practicals)CME358H1F---0.50
Engineering Economics and Decision MakingCME368H1F3-10.50
Winter Session - Year 3Lect.Lab.Tut.Wgt.
Reinforced Concrete ICIV313H1S3-20.50
Geotechnical Engineering IICIV324H1S3110.50
Transport II - PerformanceCIV332H1S3-10.50
Municipal EngineeringCIV340H1S3-20.50
Sustainable Energy SystemsCIV380H1S3-10.50
Civil Engineering Communication PortfolioCIV382Y1Y--0.250.00
Engineering Mathematics IICME362H1S3-20.50

CME358H1 - Survey CAMP (Civil and Mineral Practicals), is a two-week field-based course taken in the month prior to starting Third Year.  The results of this course are used in computing the student's Third Year Fall Session Average.  An extra fee is charged to cover part of the costs of food and accommodation.

PROFESSIONAL EXPERIENCE YEAR
Students registered within this program, and all other undergraduate programs within the Faculty of Applied Science and Engineering, may elect to enrol and participate in the Professional Experience Year (PEY) program.  The PEY program requires that qualified students undertake a paid, full-time 12-16 month continuous work period with a cooperating company.  Details are described in the beginning of this chapter.  For more information, consult the Professional Experience Year Office, 222 College Street, Suite 106 early in session 2F or 3F.
JEFFREY SKOLL BASC/MBA PROGRAM

The Jeffrey Skoll Combined BASc/MBA Program allows qualified and selected students in the Faculty of Applied Science and Engineering to complete both a BASc and an MBA in a reduced time.  Students will be admitted to the program prior to entering their fourth year of studies in the BASc program.  Interested students should contact the Registrar's Office early in the Third Year to obtain important information including application deadlines.

MINORS AND CERTIFICATE PROGRAMS

Several Engineering Minors and Certificate Programs are available and generally require the student to successfully complete a carefully selected slate of electives in their Fourth Year.  Late in the Third Year Winter Session, students use an on-line pre-registration tool to indicate their preferred fourth-year electives.  Students should review the various minor and certificate program requirements and attend the department's information sessions in Third Year to ensure that the appropriate electives are taken in Fourth Year.  Students should note that they can also complete the requirements of a minor or certificate program even after they have graduated, as long as the additional requirements are met within nine years of their initial registration in the BASc program.  If completed after graduation, additional fees will be assessed. A transcript will be issued with the amended courses and indication of completed minor or certificate program requirements.

FOURTH YEAR CIVIL ENGINEERING

Fall Session - Year 4Lect.Lab.Tut.Wgt.
Free ElectiveF/Y 0.50
Free ElectiveF/Y 0.50
Complementary Studies Elective (CS) / Humanities and Social Sciences Elective (HSS)F/Y 0.50
Choose two technical electives from the following list:
Engineering BiologyCHE353H1F3-10.50
Terrestrial Energy SystemsCIV300H1F3-20.50
Reinforced Concrete IICIV416H1F3-20.50
Construction EngineeringCIV420H1F3-20.50
Special Studies in Civil EngineeringCIV477H1F3-10.50
Individual ProjectCIV499H1F--30.50
Concrete TechnologyCIV514H1F3-20.50
Introduction to Structural DynamicsCIV515H1F3-10.50
Prestressed ConcreteCIV517H1F3--0.50
Structural Analysis IICIV519H1F3-20.50
Rock MechanicsCIV521H1F31-0.50
Transport PlanningCIV531H1F3-10.50
Groundwater Flow and ContaminationCIV549H1F3-10.50
Water Resources EngineeringCIV550H1F3-20.50
Engineering Rock MechanicsMIN429H1F3-10.50
Integrated Mine Waste EngineeringMIN511H1F3-10.50
Winter Session - Year 4Lect.Lab.Tut.Wgt.
Group Design ProjectCIV498H1S--30.50
Free ElectiveS/Y 0.50
Complementary Studies Elective (CS) / Humanities and Social Sciences Elective (HSS)S/Y 0.50
Choose two technical electives from the following list:
Cellular and Molecular BiologyCHE354H1S3-20.50
Terrestrial Energy SystemsCIV300H1S3-20.50
Environmental Impact and Risk AssessmentCIV440H1S3-10.50
Special Studies in Civil EngineeringCIV477H1S3-10.50
Individual ProjectCIV499H1S--30.50
Solid Mechanics IICIV510H1S3-20.50
Public Transit Operations and PlanningCIV516H1S3-10.50
Behaviour and Design of Steel StructuresCIV518H1S3-20.50
Geotechnical DesignCIV523H1S3-10.50
Environmental BiotechnologyCIV541H1S3--0.50
Sustainable BuildingsCIV576H1S3-10.50
Infrastructure for Sustainable CitiesCIV577H1S3-10.50
Physiological Control SystemsMIE331H1S3110.50
Fluid Mechanics IIMIE418H1S2320.50
Mining Environmental ManagementMIN430H1S3-10.50
Ventilation and Occupational HealthMIN470H1S3-10.50
Borehole Geophysics for Engineers and GeoscientistsMIN540H1S3-10.50

Students may take CIV499H1 - Individual Project in either the F term or the S term, but not in both terms.

OTHER ELECTIVE COURSES

Elective courses in addition to those listed above may be considered based on the following general guidelines.  Students wishing to take elective courses from other departments need to ensure that they have the appropriate background and prerequisites.  Students with an overall average of 75% or greater in their Third Year may take up to two graduate level (1000-series) courses, depending upon availability.  Courses listed as being open only to students in Engineering Science may also be taken if the student has a sufficiently strong background.  In all cases the interested student should consult with the Civil Engineering Office of Student Services (GB105) to obtain further information and the appropriate permission.

GRADUATE PROGRAM IN CIVIL ENGINEERING

Qualified candidates may apply for graduate studies in the MEng, MASc and PhD Programs.  The MEng program is course-based (although a 1 or 2 course-equivalent project may be taken), whereas the MASc and PhD Programs are research-intensive and require a thesis.  More information about the Department's Graduate Programs will be provided in information sessions, and can also be obtained at www.civ.utoronto.ca

Electrical and Computer Engineering

UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAM IN COMPUTER ENGINEERING (AECPEBASC)

UNDERGRADUATE STUDENT COUNSELLORS:  
Professor S. Valaee, Associate Chair, Undergraduate Studies
Ms. Linda Espeut
Ms. Jayne Leake

STUDENT ADVISORS
Ms. Karen Irving
Ms. April Cheng

Email: askece@ecf.utoronto.ca
Office: Room B600, Sandford Fleming Building

The computer engineering undergraduate program is distinctive as it is based on the broad areas of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science.  These foundations are used in the design and organization of computer systems, the design of programs that turn these systems into useful applications, and the use of computers in communication and control systems.  The design includes hardware, as well as, operating systems and software.  Computer engineering students will learn how computer systems work and how they can be integrated into larger systems that serve a wide range of users and businesses.  As a result, the program also ensures that our students will gain experience in communication, problem-solving and team management skills.

A computer engineer may be involved in the design of computers and computer systems.  They may also be engaged in the design of computer-based communications and control systems or in the design of microelectronic circuits, including computer-aided design and manufacturing.  Computer system analysis and the design of both hardware and software for applications, such as artificial intelligence and expert systems, database systems, wireless networks, computer security and robotics, are included in the scope of the computer engineer’s work.

The first two years of study provide the essential background in basic science and mathematics, and also introduces the student to the important concepts in Electrical and Computer Engineering such as circuits, digital systems, electronics, and communication systems. These two years of study are identical to Electrical Engineering.

In third and fourth year, the curriculum allows flexibility in a student’s course selection, subject to program and accreditation requirements described below.  A student has greater choice from a broad array of courses in six areas of study that would appeal to their individual strengths and interests.  A number of streams or course packages called “Public/Built-In Profiles” have been developed by the department’s Curriculum Matters Committee (CMC) members to serve as course selection examples. These can be used as inspiration for a student to help develop more concrete decisions on their own.  A student is also free to use one of the public profiles as their template. The example course packages  can be found at: http://www.ece.utoronto.ca/curriculum-streams.  An on-line program called Magellan is available to facilitate the course selection process. All second year students will have access to Magellan by the end of their fall term .  If at any time a student has questions about their curriculum decisions, contact information can be found at: http://www.ece.utoronto.ca/magellan

Graduates of the program may decide to go directly into careers in a wide range of fields, and continue to learn by direct experience and through the opportunities of company-sponsored education.  Students may also decide to pursue studies at the graduate level with studies in most areas of Electrical and Computer Engineering, or Computer Science.  More detailed information can be found at:  http://www.ece.utoronto.ca/graduates-home/

FIRST YEAR COMPUTER ENGINEERING

Fall Session - Year 1Lect.Lab.Tut.Wgt.
Computer FundamentalsAPS105H1F3210.50
Engineering Strategies & Practice IAPS111H1F3110.50
Ethics in EngineeringAPS150H1F--10.05
MechanicsCIV100H1F3-20.50
Seminar Course: Introduction to Electrical and Computer EngineeringECE101H1F1--0.15
Linear AlgebraMAT188H1F3-10.50
Calculus AMAT196H1F3-10.50
Winter Session - Year 1Lect.Lab.Tut.Wgt.
Introduction to Materials and ChemistryAPS104H1S30.5010.50
Engineering Strategies & Practice IIAPS112H1S32-0.50
Electrical FundamentalsECE110H1S3120.50
Calculus BMAT197H1S3-10.50
DynamicsMIE100H1S3-20.50

SECOND YEAR COMPUTER ENGINEERING

Fall Session - Year 2Lect.Lab.Tut.Wgt.
Circuit AnalysisECE212H1F31.5020.50
Digital SystemsECE241H1F33-0.50
Programming FundamentalsECE244H1F3210.50
Advanced Engineering MathematicsMAT290H1F3-20.50
Calculus IIIMAT291H1F3-20.50
Winter Session - Year 2Lect.Lab.Tut.Wgt.
Signals and SystemsECE216H1S3-20.50
Electric and Magnetic FieldsECE221H1S3110.50
Introductory ElectronicsECE231H1S31.5020.50
Computer OrganizationECE243H1S33-0.50
Communication and DesignECE297H1S2320.50

 

 

THIRD AND FOURTH YEAR COMPUTER ENGINEERING

COURSE SELECTION

Required Course - Year 3 or 4Lect.Lab.Tut.Wgt.
Engineering Economic Analysis & EntrepreneurshipECE472H1F/S3-20.50
Required Course - Year 4Lect.Lab.Tut.Wgt.
Design ProjectECE496Y1Y1-11.00

AREA 1 - PHOTONICS & SEMICONDUCTOR PHYSICS

Fall Term - Year 3 or 4Lect.Lab.Tut.Wgt.
KERNEL COURSES
Introduction to Electronic DevicesECE335H1F3-20.50
TECHNICAL ELECTIVES
Introduction to Micro- and Nano-Fabrication TechnologiesECE442H1F3210.50
Photonic DevicesECE527H1F3-20.50
Advanced Electronic DevicesECE535H1F31.5010.50
Winter Term - Year 3 or 4Lect.Lab.Tut.Wgt.
KERNEL COURSES
Fundamentals of OpticsECE318H1S31.5010.50
TECHNICAL ELECTIVES
Semiconductor and Device PhysicsECE330H1S3-20.50
Optical Communications and NetworksECE469H1S31.5010.50
Lasers and DetectorsECE525H1S3-20.50
Introduction to Quantum MechanicsPHY335H1S2-10.50

AREA 2 - ELECTROMAGNETICS & ENERGY SYSTEMS

Fall Term - Year 3 or 4Lect.Lab.Tut.Wgt.
KERNEL COURSES
Fundamentals of Electrical Energy SystemsECE314H1F31.5010.50
Fields and WavesECE320H1F31.5010.50
TECHNICAL ELECTIVES
Introduction to Lighting SystemsECE510H1F3-20.50
Power Electronics: Converter TopologiesECE514H1F31.5010.50
Microwave CircuitsECE524H1F31.5010.50
Winter Term - Year 3 or 4Lect.Lab.Tut.Wgt.
KERNEL COURSES
There are no winter term kernel courses offered in this areaF/S/Y 0.00
TECHNICAL ELECTIVES
Medical ImagingBME595H1S2310.50
Energy Systems and Distributed GenerationECE413H1S31.5010.50
Radio and Microwave Wireless SystemsECE422H1S31.5010.50
Electric DrivesECE463H1S31.5010.50
Power Electronics: Switch-Mode Power SuppliesECE533H1S3110.50

AREA 3 - ANALOG & DIGITAL ELECTRONICS

Fall Term - Year 3 or 4Lect.Lab.Tut.Wgt.
KERNEL COURSES
Analog ElectronicsECE331H1F31.5010.50
Digital ElectronicsECE334H1F31.5010.50
TECHNICAL ELECTIVES
Sensory CommunicationECE446H1F31.5010.50
Analog Signal Processing CircuitsECE512H1F3-20.50
Integrated Circuit EngineeringECE534H1F33-0.50
Winter Term - Year 3 or 4Lect.Lab.Tut.Wgt.
KERNEL COURSES
Analog ElectronicsECE331H1S31.5010.50
Digital ElectronicsECE334H1S31.5010.50
TECHNICAL ELECTIVES
VLSI Systems and DesignECE451H1S33-0.50
Analog Integrated CircuitsECE530H1S31.5010.50
Digital Systems DesignECE532H1S33-0.50

AREA 4 - CONTROL, COMMUNICATIONS & SIGNAL PROCESSING

Fall Term - Year 3 or 4Lect.Lab.Tut.Wgt.
KERNEL COURSES
Dynamic Systems and ControlECE311H1F31.5010.50
Communication SystemsECE316H1F31.5010.50
TECHNICAL ELECTIVES
Probability and ApplicationsECE302H1F3-20.50
Control SystemsECE410H1F31.5010.50
Digital Signal ProcessingECE431H1F31.5010.50
Neural BioelectricityECE445H1F31.5010.50
Sensory CommunicationECE446H1F31.5010.50
Random ProcessesECE537H1F3-20.50
Winter Term - Year 3 or 4Lect.Lab.Tut.Wgt.
KERNEL COURSES
Dynamic Systems and ControlECE311H1S31.5010.50
Communication SystemsECE316H1S31.5010.50
TECHNICAL ELECTIVES
Medical ImagingBME595H1S2310.50
Probability and ApplicationsECE302H1S3-20.50
Real-Time Computer ControlECE411H1S31.5010.50
Digital CommunicationECE417H1S31.5010.50
Digital Signal ProcessingECE431H1S31.5010.50
Multimedia SystemsECE462H1S32-0.50
Wireless CommunicationECE464H1S31.5010.50
Optical Communications and NetworksECE469H1S31.5010.50
Robot Modeling and ControlECE470H1S31.5010.50
Intelligent Image ProcessingECE516H1S33-0.50
Inference AlgorithmsECE521H1S3-20.50
Physiological Control SystemsMIE331H1S3110.50

AREA 5 - COMPUTER HARDWARE & COMPUTER NETWORKS

Fall Term - Year 3 or 4Lect.Lab.Tut.Wgt.
KERNEL COURSES
Computer Networks IECE361H1F31.5010.50
TECHNICAL ELECTIVES
InternetworkingECE461H1F31.500.500.50
Computer ArchitectureECE552H1F31.5010.50
Winter Term - Year 3 or 4Lect.Lab.Tut.Wgt.
KERNEL COURSES
Computer HardwareECE342H1S33-0.50
Computer Networks IECE361H1S31.5010.50
TECHNICAL ELECTIVES
VLSI Systems and DesignECE451H1S33-0.50
Computer Networks IIECE466H1S31.5010.50
Optical Communications and NetworksECE469H1S31.5010.50
Digital Systems DesignECE532H1S33-0.50

AREA 6 - SOFTWARE

Fall Term - Year 3 or 4Lect.Lab.Tut.Wgt.
KERNEL COURSES
Operating SystemsECE344H1F33-0.50
Algorithms and Data StructuresECE345H1F3-20.50
TECHNICAL ELECTIVES
Programming LanguagesCSC326H1F31.5010.50
Introduction to DatabasesCSC343H1F2-10.50
Computer GraphicsCSC418H1F2-10.50
Software Engineering ICSC444H1F31.5010.50
Compilers and InterpretersCSC467H1F31.5010.50
BiocomputationECE448H1F3-20.50
Computer Systems ProgrammingECE454H1F33-0.50
InternetworkingECE461H1F31.500.500.50
Winter Term - Year 3 or 4Lect.Lab.Tut.Wgt.
KERNEL COURSES
Operating SystemsECE344H1S33-0.50
Algorithms and Data StructuresECE345H1S3-20.50
TECHNICAL ELECTIVES
Introduction to DatabasesCSC343H1S2-10.50
Computer GraphicsCSC418H1S2-10.50
Distributed SystemsECE419H1S31.5010.50
Software Engineering IIECE450H1S31.5010.50
Optimizing CompilersECE540H1S33-0.50
Computer SecurityECE568H1S33-0.50

SCIENCE/MATH ELECTIVES

Fall Term - Year 3 or 4Lect.Lab.Tut.Wgt.
Partial Differential EquationsAPM384H1F3-10.50
Cellular and Molecular Bioengineering IIBME455H1F31.5010.50
Engineering BiologyCHE353H1F3-10.50
Urban Engineering EcologyCIV220H1F3-10.50
Terrestrial Energy SystemsCIV300H1F3-20.50
Probability and ApplicationsECE302H1F3-20.50
BiocomputationECE448H1F3-20.50
Winter Term - Year 3 or 4Lect.Lab.Tut.Wgt.
Biomedical Engineering Technology and InvestigationBME440H1S24-0.50
Cellular and Molecular BiologyCHE354H1S3-20.50
Terrestrial Energy SystemsCIV300H1S3-20.50
Probability and ApplicationsECE302H1S3-20.50
Evolution and AdaptationEEB214H1S2-10.50
Physiological Control SystemsMIE331H1S3110.50
Materials PhysicsMSE235H1S3-10.50
Introduction to Quantum MechanicsPHY335H1S2-10.50
Physics of the EarthPHY395H1S2-10.50
ECE Program Requirements

There are nine requirements:

1.  BREADTH REQUIREMENT:  A minimum of four kernel courses, each in a different area, must be chosen.

2.  DEPTH REQUIREMENT:  Select at least two areas from which one kernel course has been chosen.  In each of these two areas, two additional technical courses must be chosen.  Kernel courses may also be chosen to meet this requirement.

3.  ENGINEERING ECONOMICS REQUIREMENTSECE472H1 must be chosen.  Course can be taken in either third or fourth year.

4.  CAPSTONE REQUIREMENT:  The Design Project, ECE496Y1, must be taken in fourth year.  To be eligible to register for the capstone course, you must have at least 7 technical electives or 6 technical electives plus ECE472H1.

5.  MATH/SCIENCE REQUIREMENT:  At least one course from the Math/Science area must be chosen.

6.  TECHNICAL ELECTIVE REQUIREMENT:  A minimum of three additional ECE technical courses must be chosen from any of the six areas of study.  With approval from ECE, one of the technical electives can be taken from another department. Only 300, 400 and 500 level courses can be used as a technical elective.

7.  FREE ELECTIVE REQUIREMENT:  One is required, and may be a technical or a non-technical course.

8.  COMPLEMENTARY STUDIES REQUIREMENT:  In each of terms 3F, 3S, 4F, and 4S, a complementary studies course must be taken.  Of the four complementary studies courses, a minimum of two must be humanities and social science (HSS) courses chosen from an approved list on the Registrar's website: http://www.undergrad.engineering.utoronto.ca/Office_of_the_Registrar/Electives.htm

9. PRACTICAL EXPERIENCE REQUIREMENT:  Students are required to have completed a total of 600 hours of acceptable practical experience before graduation (normally during their summer vacation periods).  Students registered within this program, may elect to enrol and participate in the Professional Experience Year (PEY) program.  The PEY program requires that qualified students undertake a paid, full-time 12-16 month continuous work period with a participating company.  Details are described at the beginning of this chapter.  For more information, consult the PEY Office early in session 2F or 3F.

A sample course selection arrangement for third and fourth year is shown in the table below.

3F Technical Elective Other Science/Math Area Kernel Area Kernel Complementary Studies
3S Engineering Economics Depth Area Kernel Area Kernel Complementary Studies
4F Technical Elective Depth Depth 4th Year Design Project Humanities & Social Science
4S Free Elective Technical Elective Depth 4th Year Design Project Humanities & Social Science
Degree Designation

If, among the eight courses required to satisfy the Breadth requirement (1) and the Depth requirement (2), at least four are selected from Areas 5 and 6, then the student is eligible for the B.A.Sc. degree in Computer Engineering.  If, among these eight courses, at least five are selected from Areas 1 to 4, then the student is eligible for the B.A.Sc. degree in Electrical Engineering.  By appropriate choice of kernel courses as technical or free electives, it may be possible to satisfy these requirements simultaneously; in this case, the student must choose one of the two designations.

In addition to the above program requirements, all CEAB requirements, including the minimum number of accreditation units (AU's) in the various CEAB categories, must be met in order to graduate.

CEAB Requirements

To satisfy CEAB requirements, students must accumulate, during four years of study, a minimum number of academic units in six categories:  complementary studies, mathematics, basic science, engineering science, engineering design, combined engineering science and design.  For details on how to verify satisfaction of CEAB requirements, students are referred to the ECE Undergraduate website:
http://www.ece.utoronto.ca/magellan.

It is recognized that the course selection process can be complex in the flexible curriculum for third and fourth year.  Students are advised to consult the ECE Undergraduate Office on questions related to course selection.  In addition, tools will be provided to assist students to ensure satisfaction of all requirements in their course selection.  For complete details, students are referred to the ECE Department Undergraduate Studies office at askece@ecf.utoronto.ca.

A student who selects a course of study that does not meet ECE and CEAB requirements will not be eligible to graduate.

Graduate Programs in Computer Engineering

Graduate study and research in Computer Engineering may be pursued in either the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering or the Department of Computer Science.  Both theoretical and applied topics are encouraged.  Programs lead to the M.Eng. or M.A.Sc. degree in Engineering or the M.Sc. in Computer Science, and to the Ph.D. in either Department.  Prospective graduate studies should consult the Departments early to determine the most appropriate Department in which to register.

UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAM IN ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING (AEELEBASC)

UNDERGRADUATE STUDENT COUNSELLORS:  
Professor S. Valaee, Associate Chair, Undergraduate Studies 
Ms. Linda Espeut    
Ms. Jayne Leake

STUDENT ADVISORS:  
Ms. Karen Irving     
Ms. April Cheng

Email: askece@ecf.utoronto.ca
Office: Room B600, Sandford Fleming Building

Electrical engineering is an exciting and extensive field that applies the principles of science and mathematics with engineering fundamentals which are then used to develop a student’s skills needed to analyze, design and build electrical, electronic and photonics systems.  The program includes diverse areas of study such as microelectronics, digital communications, wireless systems, photonics systems, signal processing, control, microprocessors, computer technology, energy systems and electronic device fabrication.  This breadth is unique to Electrical Engineering and opens a wide range of career possibilities.  As a result, the program also ensures that through their course work, a student gains experience in communication, problem-solving and team management skills.

An electrical engineer may be involved in the design, development and testing of electrical and electronic equipment such as telecommunication systems, industrial process controls, signal processing, navigation systems, power generation, transmission systems, wireless and optical communications and integrated circuit engineering.

The first two years of study provide the essential background in basic science and mathematics and also introduces the student to the important concepts in Electrical and Computer Engineering such as circuits, digital systems, electronics, and communication systems. These two years of study are identical to Computer Engineering.

In third and fourth year, the curriculum allows flexibility in a student’s course selection, subject to program and accreditation requirements described below.  A student has greater choice from a broad array of courses in six areas of study that would appeal to their individual strengths and interests.  A number of streams or course packages called “Public/Built-In Profiles” have been developed by the department's Curriculum Matters Committee (CMC) members to serve as course selection examples. These can be used as inspiration for a student to help develop more concrete decisions on their own.  A student is also free to use one of the public profiles as their template, the example course packages can be found at: http://www.ece.utoronto.ca/curriculum-streams.  An on-line program called Magellan is available to facilitate the course selection process. All second year students will have access to Magellan by the end of their fall term.  If at any time a student has questions about their curriculum decisions, contact information can be found at: http://www.ece.utoronto.ca/magellan


Graduates of the program may decide to go directly into careers in a wide range of fields and continue to learn by direct experience and through the opportunities of company-sponsored education.  Students may also decide to pursue studies at the graduate level and can find more detailed information at: http://www.ece.utoronto.ca/graduates-home/

FIRST YEAR ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING

Fall Session - Year 1Lect.Lab.Tut.Wgt.
Computer FundamentalsAPS105H1F3210.50
Engineering Strategies & Practice IAPS111H1F3110.50
Ethics in EngineeringAPS150H1F--10.05
MechanicsCIV100H1F3-20.50
Seminar Course: Introduction to Electrical and Computer EngineeringECE101H1F1--0.15
Linear AlgebraMAT188H1F3-10.50
Calculus AMAT196H1F3-10.50
Winter Session - Year 1Lect.Lab.Tut.Wgt.
Introduction to Materials and ChemistryAPS104H1S30.5010.50
Engineering Strategies & Practice IIAPS112H1S32-0.50
Electrical FundamentalsECE110H1S3120.50
Calculus BMAT197H1S3-10.50
DynamicsMIE100H1S3-20.50

SECOND YEAR ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING

Fall Session - Year 2Lect.Lab.Tut.Wgt.
Circuit AnalysisECE212H1F31.5020.50
Digital SystemsECE241H1F33-0.50
Programming FundamentalsECE244H1F3210.50
Advanced Engineering MathematicsMAT290H1F3-20.50
Calculus IIIMAT291H1F3-20.50
Winter Session - Year 2Lect.Lab.Tut.Wgt.
Signals and SystemsECE216H1S3-20.50
Electric and Magnetic FieldsECE221H1S3110.50
Introductory ElectronicsECE231H1S31.5020.50
Computer OrganizationECE243H1S33-0.50
Communication and DesignECE297H1S2320.50

 

 

THIRD AND FOURTH YEAR ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING

COURSE SELECTION

Required Course - Year 3 or 4Lect.Lab.Tut.Wgt.
Engineering Economic Analysis & EntrepreneurshipECE472H1F/S3-20.50
Required Course - Year 4Lect.Lab.Tut.Wgt.
Design ProjectECE496Y1Y1-11.00

AREA 1 - PHOTONICS & SEMICONDUCTOR PHYSICS

Fall Term - Year 3 or 4Lect.Lab.Tut.Wgt.
KERNEL COURSES
Introduction to Electronic DevicesECE335H1F3-20.50
TECHNICAL ELECTIVES
Introduction to Micro- and Nano-Fabrication TechnologiesECE442H1F3210.50
Photonic DevicesECE527H1F3-20.50
Advanced Electronic DevicesECE535H1F31.5010.50
Winter Term - Year 3 or 4Lect.Lab.Tut.Wgt.
KERNEL COURSES
Fundamentals of OpticsECE318H1S31.5010.50
TECHNICAL ELECTIVES
Semiconductor and Device PhysicsECE330H1S3-20.50
Optical Communications and NetworksECE469H1S31.5010.50
Lasers and DetectorsECE525H1S3-20.50
Introduction to Quantum MechanicsPHY335H1S2-10.50

AREA 2 - ELECTROMAGNETICS & ENERGY SYSTEMS

Fall Term - Year 3 or 4Lect.Lab.Tut.Wgt.
KERNEL COURSES
Fundamentals of Electrical Energy SystemsECE314H1F31.5010.50
Fields and WavesECE320H1F31.5010.50
TECHNICAL ELECTIVES
Introduction to Lighting SystemsECE510H1F3-20.50
Power Electronics: Converter TopologiesECE514H1F31.5010.50
Microwave CircuitsECE524H1F31.5010.50
Winter Term - Year 3 or 4Lect.Lab.Tut.Wgt.
KERNEL COURSES
There are no winter term kernel courses offered in this area.
TECHNICAL ELECTIVES
Medical ImagingBME595H1S2310.50
Energy Systems and Distributed GenerationECE413H1S31.5010.50
Radio and Microwave Wireless SystemsECE422H1S31.5010.50
Electric DrivesECE463H1S31.5010.50
Power Electronics: Switch-Mode Power SuppliesECE533H1S3110.50

AREA 3 - ANALOG & DIGITAL ELECTRONICS

Fall Term - Year 3 or 4Lect.Lab.Tut.Wgt.
KERNEL COURSES
Analog ElectronicsECE331H1F31.5010.50
Digital ElectronicsECE334H1F31.5010.50
TECHNICAL ELECTIVES
Sensory CommunicationECE446H1F31.5010.50
Analog Signal Processing CircuitsECE512H1F3-20.50
Integrated Circuit EngineeringECE534H1F33-0.50
Winter Term - Year 3 or 4Lect.Lab.Tut.Wgt.
KERNEL COURSES
Analog ElectronicsECE331H1S31.5010.50
Digital ElectronicsECE334H1S31.5010.50
TECHNICAL ELECTIVES
VLSI Systems and DesignECE451H1S33-0.50
Analog Integrated CircuitsECE530H1S31.5010.50
Digital Systems DesignECE532H1S33-0.50

AREA 4 - CONTROL, COMMUNICATIONS & SIGNAL PROCESSING

Fall Term - Year 3 or 4Lect.Lab.Tut.Wgt.
KERNEL COURSES
Dynamic Systems and ControlECE311H1F31.5010.50
Communication SystemsECE316H1F31.5010.50
TECHNICAL ELECTIVES
Probability and ApplicationsECE302H1F3-20.50
Control SystemsECE410H1F31.5010.50
Digital Signal ProcessingECE431H1F31.5010.50
Neural BioelectricityECE445H1F31.5010.50
Sensory CommunicationECE446H1F31.5010.50
Random ProcessesECE537H1F3-20.50
Winter Term - Year 3 or 4Lect.Lab.Tut.Wgt.
KERNEL COURSES
Dynamic Systems and ControlECE311H1S31.5010.50
Communication SystemsECE316H1S31.5010.50
TECHNICAL ELECTIVES
Medical ImagingBME595H1S2310.50
Probability and ApplicationsECE302H1S3-20.50
Real-Time Computer ControlECE411H1S31.5010.50
Digital CommunicationECE417H1S31.5010.50
Digital Signal ProcessingECE431H1S31.5010.50
Multimedia SystemsECE462H1S32-0.50
Wireless CommunicationECE464H1S31.5010.50
Optical Communications and NetworksECE469H1S31.5010.50
Robot Modeling and ControlECE470H1S31.5010.50
Intelligent Image ProcessingECE516H1S33-0.50
Inference AlgorithmsECE521H1S3-20.50
Physiological Control SystemsMIE331H1S3110.50

AREA 5 - COMPUTER HARDWARE & COMPUTER NETWORKS

Fall Term - Year 3 or 4Lect.Lab.Tut.Wgt.
KERNEL COURSES
Computer Networks IECE361H1F31.5010.50
TECHNICAL ELECTIVES
InternetworkingECE461H1F31.500.500.50
Computer ArchitectureECE552H1F31.5010.50
Winter Term - Year 3 or 4Lect.Lab.Tut.Wgt.
KERNEL COURSES
Computer HardwareECE342H1S33-0.50
Computer Networks IECE361H1S31.5010.50
TECHNICAL ELECTIVES
VLSI Systems and DesignECE451H1S33-0.50
Computer Networks IIECE466H1S31.5010.50
Optical Communications and NetworksECE469H1S31.5010.50
Digital Systems DesignECE532H1S33-0.50

AREA 6 - SOFTWARE

Fall Term - Year 3 or 4Lect.Lab.Tut.Wgt.
KERNEL COURSES
Operating SystemsECE344H1F33-0.50
Algorithms and Data StructuresECE345H1F3-20.50
TECHNICAL ELECTIVES
Programming LanguagesCSC326H1F31.5010.50
Introduction to DatabasesCSC343H1F2-10.50
Computer GraphicsCSC418H1F2-10.50
Software Engineering ICSC444H1F31.5010.50
Compilers and InterpretersCSC467H1F31.5010.50
BiocomputationECE448H1F3-20.50
Computer Systems ProgrammingECE454H1F33-0.50
InternetworkingECE461H1F31.500.500.50
Winter Term - Year 3 or 4Lect.Lab.Tut.Wgt.
KERNEL COURSES
Operating SystemsECE344H1S33-0.50
Algorithms and Data StructuresECE345H1S3-20.50
TECHNICAL ELECTIVES
Introduction to DatabasesCSC343H1S2-10.50
Computer GraphicsCSC418H1S2-10.50
Distributed SystemsECE419H1S31.5010.50
Software Engineering IIECE450H1S31.5010.50
Optimizing CompilersECE540H1S33-0.50
Computer SecurityECE568H1S33-0.50

SCIENCE/MATH ELECTIVES

Fall Term - Year 3 or 4Lect.Lab.Tut.Wgt.
Partial Differential EquationsAPM384H1F3-10.50
Cellular and Molecular Bioengineering IIBME455H1F31.5010.50
Engineering BiologyCHE353H1F3-10.50
Urban Engineering EcologyCIV220H1F3-10.50
Terrestrial Energy SystemsCIV300H1F3-20.50
Probability and ApplicationsECE302H1F3-20.50
BiocomputationECE448H1F3-20.50
Winter Term - Year 3 or 4Lect.Lab.Tut.Wgt.
Biomedical Engineering Technology and InvestigationBME440H1F24-0.50
Cellular and Molecular BiologyCHE354H1S3-20.50
Terrestrial Energy SystemsCIV300H1S3-20.50
Probability and ApplicationsECE302H1S3-20.50
Evolution and AdaptationEEB214H1S2-10.50
Physiological Control SystemsMIE331H1S3110.50
Materials PhysicsMSE235H1S3-10.50
Introduction to Quantum MechanicsPHY335H1S2-10.50
Physics of the EarthPHY395H1S2-10.50
ECE Program Requirements

There are nine requirements:

1.  BREADTH REQUIREMENT:  A minimum of four kernel courses, each in a different area, must be chosen.

2.  DEPTH REQUIREMENT:  Select at least two areas from which one kernel course has been chosen.  In each of these two areas, two additional technical courses must be chosen.  Kernel courses may also be chosen to meet this requirement.

3.  ENGINEERING ECONOMICS REQUIREMENTSECE472H1 must be chosen.  Course can be taken in either third or fourth year.

4.  CAPSTONE REQUIREMENT:  The Design Project, ECE496Y1, must be taken in fourth year.  To be eligible to register for the capstone course, you must have at least 7 technical electives or 6 technical electives plus ECE472H1.

5.  MATH/SCIENCE REQUIREMENT:  At least one course from the Math/Science area must be chosen.

6.  TECHNICAL ELECTIVE REQUIREMENT:  A minimum of three additional ECE technical courses must be chosen from any of the six areas of study.  With approval from ECE, one of the technical electives can be taken from another department. Only 300, 400 and 500 level courses can be used as a technical elective.

7.  FREE ELECTIVE REQUIREMENT:  One is required, and may be a technical or a non-technical course.

8.  COMPLEMENTARY STUDIES REQUIREMENT:  In each of terms 3F, 3S, 4F, and 4S, a complementary studies course must be taken.  Of the four complementary studies courses, a minimum of two must be humanities and social science (HSS) courses chosen from an approved list on the Registrar's website:  http://www.undergrad.engineering.utoronto.ca/Office_of_the_Registrar/Electives.htm

9. PRACTICAL EXPERIENCE REQUIREMENT:  Students are required to have completed a total of 600 hours of acceptable practical experience before graduation (normally during their summer vacation periods).  Students registered within this program, may elect to enrol and participate in the Professional Experience Year (PEY) program.  The PEY program requires that qualified students undertake a paid, full-time 12-16 month continuous work period with a participating company.  Details are described at the beginning of this chapter.  For more information, consult the PEY Office early in session 2F or 3F.

A sample course selection arrangement for third and fourth year is shown in the table below.

3F Technical Elective Other Science/Math Area Kernel Area Kernel Complementary Studies
3S Engineering Economics Depth Area Kernel Area Kernel Complementary Studies
4F Technical Elective Depth Depth 4th Year Design Project Humanities & Social Science
4S Free Elective Technical Elective Depth 4th Year Design Project Humanities & Social Science
Degree Designation

If, among the eight courses required to satisfy the Breadth requirement (1) and the Depth requirement (2), at least four are selected from Areas 5 and 6, then the student is eligible for the B.A.Sc. degree in Computer Engineering.  If, among these eight courses, at least five are selected from Areas 1 to 4, then the student is eligible for the B.A.Sc. degree in Electrical Engineering.  By appropriate choice of kernel courses as technical or free electives, it may be possible to satisfy these requirements simultaneously; in this case, the student must choose one of the two designations.

CEAB Requirements

  To satisfy CEAB requirements, students must accumulate, during four years of study, a minimum number of academic units in six categories:  complementary studies, mathematics, basic science, engineering science, engineering design, combined engineering science and design.  For details on how to verify satisfaction of CEAB requirements, students are referred to the ECE Undergraduate website:
http://www.ece.utoronto.ca/magellan.
  It is recognized that the course selection process can be complex in the flexible curriculum for third and fourth year.  Students are advised to consult the ECE Undergraduate Office on questions related to course selection.  In addition, tools will be provided to assist students to ensure satisfaction of all requirements in their course selection.  For complete details, students are referred to the ECE Department Undergraduate Studies office at askece@ecf.utoronto.ca.
  A student who selects a course of study that does not meet ECE and CEAB requirements will not be eligible to graduate.

Graduate Programs in Electrical Engineering

Graduate study and research in Electrical Engineering may be pursued in either the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering or the Department of Computer Science.  Both theoretical and applied topics are encouraged.  Programs lead to the M.Eng. or M.A.Sc. degree in Engineering or the M.Sc. in Computer Science, and to the Ph.D. in either Department.  Prospective graduate studies should consult the Departments early to determine the most appropriate Department in which to register.

Engineering Science

UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAM IN ENGINEERING SCIENCE (AEESCBASE)

CHAIR:
Professor Mark Kortschot, Ph.D., P.Eng.
Room 2110, Bahen Centre, 416-978-2903
Email: chair.engsci@ecf.utoronto.ca

UNDERGRADUATE STUDENT COUNSELLORS:
Hana Lee (Years 1 and 2)
Room 2110, Bahen Centre, 416-946-7351
Email: nsci1_2@ecf.utoronto.ca

Anne Marie Kwan (Years 3 and 4)
Room 2110, Bahen Centre, 416-946-7352
Email: nsci3_4@ecf.utoronto.ca

Engineering Science is an enriched program that provides excellent preparation for postgraduate studies in engineering and science as well as for other professional degree programs such as business, law and medicine. Graduates of the program are also well qualified to immediately embark on professional engineering-related careers.


The Engineering Science program shares elements of the Faculty’s Engineering programs, but is distinct in many respects, with the key differences being:

Engineering Science students in years 1, 2 and 3 are required to maintain a full course load, unless they gain permission from their academic counsellor in the Division of Engineering Science to pursue part time studies or less than a normal/full course load due to medical or personal reasons. Students entering year 4 are expected to maintain a full course load, but students with medical or personal reasons or who have completed program requirements through summer school or while on PEY may go part time or less than a full course load in 4F and/or 4W. This is subject to the approval of their academic counsellor. Please note that a reduced course load in 4F or 4W may impact award assessments. Please refer to the academic calendar under "Academic Regulations VII: Academic Standing" for Honours Standing criteria related to course load, and consult with your academic counsellor for more information.

Transfers in Year 1 from Engineering Science to one of the Faculty’s Engineering programs are permitted early in the Fall Session (towards the end of September), at the end of the Fall Session, and at the end of the Winter Session.  Continuation into the Winter Session of Year 1 requires a minimum average of 55% in the Fall Session and continuation into Year 2 requires a minimum average of 65% in the Winter Session of Year 1.  Students who do not meet these requirements are permitted to transfer into one of the Faculty’s Engineering programs, subject to the requirements and provisions outlined in the section on Academic Regulations in this Calendar.  

THE ENGINEERING SCIENCE CURRICULUM
The first two years of the curriculum focus on the foundations of both engineering and science.  The courses in the first two years of the program are common for all students and are only offered to students in the program.  At the end of Second Year, each student selects one of the following Options to pursue in their final two years. This represents their major field of specialization:
Aerospace Engineering
Biomedical Systems Engineering (formerly Biomedical Engineering)
Electrical and Computer Engineering
Energy Systems Engineering
Engineering Mathematics, Statistics & Finance
Infrastructure Engineering
Nanoengineering
Engineering Physics


The curriculum for the first two years and the curricula for the eight Options are presented on the pages that follow.

Degree Designation
Engineering Science students graduate with the degree “Bachelor of Applied Science in Engineering Science”.  On their official transcript, their chosen Option is indicated as their Major, e.g. Major in Aerospace Engineering.

Degree Requirements
In order to graduate, students must meet all of the degree requirements outlined in the section on Academic Regulations in this Calendar.  In addition to these requirements, students must also successfully complete their chosen Program of Study in Engineering Science as described on the following pages of this Calendar, as well as the curriculum requirements of the Canadian Engineering Accreditation Board (CEAB). 
   To complete their chosen Program of Study, students are responsible for ensuring that they have taken all of the required courses and the correct number of technical electives for their Option.  Requests for elective course substitutions will be considered but must be approved in advance by the Division of Engineering Science through their counsellor. This also applies to any course listed as ‘Other Technical Elective’. Students must also meet the Complementary Studies (CS) requirements of the program. This includes 2.0 credits, of which 1.0 credit must be in Humanities and Social Sciences (HSS). More information on CS and HSS electives may be found in the Curriculum & Programs section of this Calendar.
   To satisfy the CEAB requirements, students must accumulate during their program of study a minimum total number of accreditation units (AU) as well as a minimum number of AU in six categories: complementary studies, mathematics, natural science, engineering science, engineering design, and combined engineering science and design.  The Division of Engineering Science provides students with a planning tool called the AU Tracker to help students ensure that they satisfy these requirements. The AU Tracker, which lists all successfully completed courses as well as all of the courses they are enrolled in for the current academic year, confirms whether students are on track to meet or exceed the CEAB requirements.

If a student is deficient in terms of the Program of Study or falls short in any of the CEAB categories, the student must adjust their course selection accordingly in order to graduate.

YEAR 1 CURRICULUM- ENGINEERING SCIENCE

Fall Session - Year 1Lect.Lab.Tut.Wgt.
Structures and Materials - An Introduction to Engineering DesignCIV102H1F3110.50
Praxis IESC101H1F3-20.50
Engineering Mathematics and ComputationESC103H1F2-20.50
Calculus IMAT194H1F3-10.50
Classical MechanicsPHY180H1F31.5010.50
Introduction to Computer ProgrammingCSC180H1F33-0.50
Winter Session - Year 1Lect.Lab.Tut.Wgt.
Fundamentals of Electric CircuitsECE159H1S31.5010.50
Praxis IIESC102H1S3-20.50
Linear AlgebraMAT185H1S3-10.50
Calculus IIMAT195H1S3-10.50
Molecules and MaterialsMSE160H1S3-10.50
Computer Algorithms and Data Structures CSC190H1S33-0.50

YEAR 2 CURRICULUM - ENGINEERING SCIENCE

Fall Session - Year 2Lect.Lab.Tut.Wgt.
Vector Calculus & Fluid MechanicsAER210H1F30.5020.50
Thermodynamics and Heat TransferCHE260H1F30.5010.50
Digital and Computer SystemsECE253H1F33-0.50
Engineering, Society & Critical ThinkingESC203H1F3-10.50
Calculus IIIMAT292H1F3-20.50
Waves and Modern PhysicsPHY293H1F3110.50
Winter Session - Year 2Lect.Lab.Tut.Wgt.
Engineering DesignAER201H1S15-0.50
ElectromagnetismECE259H1S3-10.50
Biomolecules and CellsBME205H1S21.7510.50
Quantum and Thermal PhysicsPHY294H1S3110.50
Probability and StatisticsSTA286H1S3-10.50
Complementary Studies ElectiveS 0.50

1. All students must graduate with 1.0 credit in Humanities & Social Sciences (HSS). Students will gain 0.5 HSS credit from ESC203H1.
2. Please note that additional lectures may be scheduled for AER201H1 in place of laboratory time in the first few weeks of the Winter Session.

PROFESSIONAL EXPERIENCE YEAR

Students registered within this program, and all other undergraduate programs within the Faculty of Applied Science and Engineering, may elect to enrol and participate in the Professional Experience Year (PEY) program. The PEY program requires that qualified students undertake a paid, full-time 12-16 month continuous work period with a cooperating industry. Details are described in the beginning of this calendar. For more information, consult the Professional Experience Year Office, 45 Willcocks Street 2nd Floor, early in session 2F or 3F.

OPTION AEROSPACE ENGINEERING (AEESCBASEA)

YEAR 3 AEROSPACE ENGINEERING

Fall Session - Year 3Lect.Lab.Tut.Wgt.
DynamicsAER301H1F3-10.50
Aerospace Laboratory IAER303H1F-1-0.15
AerodynamicsAER307H1F3-10.50
Combustion ProcessesAER315H1F3-10.50
Partial Differential EquationsAPM384H1F3-10.50
Economic Analysis and Decision MakingCHE374H1F3-10.50
Complex AnalysisMAT389H1F3-10.50
Engineering Science Option SeminarESC301Y1Y--0.500.10
Winter Session - Year 3Lect.Lab.Tut.Wgt.
Aircraft FlightAER302H1S3-10.50
Aerospace Laboratory IIAER304H1S-1-0.15
GasdynamicsAER310H1S3-10.50
Scientific ComputingAER336H1S3-10.50
Control SystemsAER372H1S31.5010.50
Mechanics of Solids and StructuresAER373H1S3-10.50
Engineering Science Option SeminarESC301Y1Y--0.500.10

YEAR 4 AEROSPACE ENGINEERING

Fall Session - Year 4Lect.Lab.Tut.Wgt.
Space Systems DesignAER407H1F-3-0.50
Advanced Mechanics of StructuresAER501H1F3-10.50
Complementary Studies ElectiveF 0.50
and two of:
ThesisESC499H1F32-0.50
ThesisESC499Y1Y32-1.00
Spacecraft Dynamics and ControlAER506H1F3-10.50
Introduction to Fusion EnergyAER507H1F3-10.50
RoboticsAER525H1F31.5010.50
Applied Nonlinear EquationsAPM446H1F3--0.50
Systems ControlECE557H1F31.5010.50
Advanced Atmospheric PhysicsPHY492H1F2--0.50
Other Technical ElectiveF 0.50
Winter Session - Year 4Lect.Lab.Tut.Wgt.
Aircraft DesignAER406H1S--30.50
Complementary Studies ElectiveS 0.50
and three of:
ThesisESC499H1S32-0.50
ThesisESC499Y1Y32-1.00
AeroelasticityAER503H1S3-10.50
Aerospace PropulsionAER510H1S3-10.50
Other Technical ElectiveS 0.50
1. Students must take a half-year thesis in 4F or 4S, or take a full-year thesis.
2. Students must take at least two of AER503H1, AER506H1, AER510H1 or AER525H1.
OPTION BIOMEDICAL ENGINEERING (AEESCBASEB)

YEAR 4 BIOMEDICAL ENGINEERING

Fall Session - Year 4Lect.Lab.Tut.Wgt.
ThesisESC499Y1Y32-1.00
Complementary Studies ElectiveF 0.50
and three of:
Biochemistry I: Proteins, Lipids and MetabolismBCH210H1F3-20.50
Biomaterial and Medical Device Product DevelopmentBME460H1F2-20.50
Bioprocess EngineeringCHE466H1F30.6610.50
Chemical Properties of PolymersCHE562H1F3-10.50
Communication SystemsECE316H1F31.5010.50
Neural BioelectricityECE445H1F31.5010.50
Sensory CommunicationECE446H1F31.5010.50
BiocomputationECE448H1F3-20.50
Digital Signal ProcessingECE455H1F31.5010.50
Systems ControlECE557H1F31.5010.50
Engineering Science Capstone DesignESC471H1F--50.50
General & Human GeneticsHMB265H1F2-10.50
Human Physiology IPSL300H1F3-10.50
Winter Session - Year 4Lect.Lab.Tut.Wgt.
ThesisESC499Y1Y32-1.00
and four of:
Biomedical Systems Engineering III: Molecules and CellsBME396H1S3310.50
Biomedical Systems Engineering DesignBME489H1S--50.50
Regenerative MedicineBME510H1S4--0.50
Medical ImagingBME595H1S2310.50
Biocomposites: Mechanics and BioinspirationCHE475H1S3-10.50
Data-based Modelling for Prediction and ControlCHE507H1S3-10.50
Communication SystemsECE316H1S31.5010.50
Fundamentals of OpticsECE318H1S31.5010.50
Real-Time Computer ControlECE411H1S31.5010.50
Inference AlgorithmsECE521H1S3-20.50
Introduction to NeuroscienceHMB200H1S2-10.50
Biomechanics IMIE439H1S32-0.50
Healthcare SystemsMIE561H1S3-20.50
Biomaterials and BiocompatibilityMSE352H1S3-10.50
Surgical and Dental Implant DesignMSE442H1S3-10.50
Introduction to Pharmacology and Pharmacokinetic PrinciplesPCL201H1S3-10.50
Other Technical ElectiveS 0.50

1. Students who have completed Year 3 of the Biomedical Engineering Option should follow the Year 4 of the Biomedical Engineering Option.
2. Students must take at least two of the courses: BME396H1, MSE352H1, MIE439H1, BME595H1 and at least one, but no more than two of BCH210H1 PSL300H1, HMB265H1, PCL201H1 and HMB200H1.
3. HMB200H1 has limited enrolment and is first offered to human biology students. Enrolment information will be communicated to students by early August.                                         
4. Students must take at least one of BME489H1, MIE439H1 or ESC471H1.
5. Students taking BME489H1 must take BME479H1.

OPTION BIOMEDICAL SYSTEMS ENGINEERING (AEESCBASET)

YEAR 3 BIOMEDICAL SYSTEMS ENGINEERING

Fall Session - Year 3Lect.Lab.Tut.Wgt.
Partial Differential EquationsAPM384H1F3-10.50
Modeling, Dynamics, and Control of Biological SystemsBME344H1F3-10.50
Biomedical Systems Engineering I: Organ SystemsBME350H1F34-0.50
Biomedical Systems Engineering II: Cells and TissuesBME395H1F3-20.50
Organic Chemistry and BiochemistryCHE391H1F31.5010.50
Engineering Science Option SeminarESC301Y1Y--0.500.10
Winter Session - Year 3Lect.Lab.Tut.Wgt.
Biomedical Engineering and Omics TechnologiesBME346H1S24-0.50
Molecular BiophysicsBME358H1S3-10.50
Biomedical Systems Engineering III: Molecules and CellsBME396H1S3310.50
Biomechanics IMIE439H1S32-0.50
Biomaterials and BiocompatibilityMSE352H1S3-10.50
Engineering Science Option SeminarESC301Y1Y--0.500.10

YEAR 4 BIOMEDICAL SYSTEMS ENGINEERING

Fall Session - Year 4Lect.Lab.Tut.Wgt.
ThesisESC499Y1Y32-1.00
Biomedical Systems Engineering IV: Computational Systems BiologyBME428H1F3310.50
Introduction to Biomedical Systems Engineering Design ConceptsBME479H1F--10.10
Economic Analysis and Decision MakingCHE374H1F3-10.50
Complementary Studies electiveF 0.50
Technical electiveF 0.50
Winter Session - Year 4Lect.Lab.Tut.Wgt.
ThesisESC499Y1Y32-1.00
Biomedical Systems Engineering DesignBME489H1S--50.50
Complementary Studies electiveS 0.50
Technical electiveS 0.50
Technical electiveS 0.50

TECHNICAL ELECTIVES

Technical ElectivesLect.Lab.Tut.Wgt.
Systems and Synthetic Biology
Regulatory Networks and Systems in Molecular BiologyCSB435H1F2--0.50
Proteomics in Systems BiologyCSB450H1F2--0.50
BiocomputationECE448H1F3-20.50
Modelling in Biological and Chemical SystemsCHE471H1S3-10.50
Regenerative Medicine and Biomaterials
Biomaterial and Medical Device Product DevelopmentBME460H1F2-20.50
Regenerative MedicineBME510H1S4--0.50
Biocomposites: Mechanics and BioinspirationCHE475H1S3-10.50
Chemical Properties of PolymersCHE562H1F3-10.50
* Design of Innovative ProductsMIE440H1F2210.50
Biotransport PhenomenaMIE520H1F3-10.50
Surgical and Dental Implant DesignMSE442H1S3-10.50
Technical ElectivesLect.Lab.Tut.Wgt.
Neuro Sensory and Rehab Engineering
Communication SystemsECE316H1F/S31.5010.50
Neural BioelectricityECE445H1F31.5010.50
Sensory CommunicationECE446H1F31.5010.50
Robot Modeling and ControlECE470H1S31.5010.50
Systems ControlECE557H1F31.5010.50
Introduction to NeuroscienceHMB200H1S2-10.50
* Design of Innovative ProductsMIE440H1F2210.50
Sensors, Nano/Microsystems and Instrumentation
Medical ImagingBME595H1S2310.50
Fundamentals of OpticsECE318H1S31.5010.50
Real-Time Computer ControlECE411H1S31.5010.50
Introduction to Micro- and Nano-Fabrication TechnologiesECE442H1F3210.50
Digital Signal ProcessingECE455H1F31.5010.50
* MEMS Design and MicrofabricationMIE506H1F31.5010.50

1. Students are required to take a minimum of two technical electives from one focus area (Systems and Synthetic Biology; Regenerative Medicine and Biomaterials; Neuro, Sensory and Rehab Engineering; or Sensors, Nano/Microsystems and Instrumentation).

OPTION ELECTRICAL AND COMPUTER ENGINEERING (AEESCBASER)

YEAR 3 ELECTRICAL AND COMPUTER ENGINEERING

Fall Session-Year 3Lect.Lab.Tut.Wgt.
Economic Analysis and Decision MakingCHE374H1F3-10.50
Introduction to Energy SystemsECE349H1F31.5010.50
Computer OrganizationECE352H1F33-0.50
Signal Analysis and CommunicationECE355H1F3-20.50
ElectronicsECE360H1F31.5010.50
Engineering Science Option SeminarESC301Y1Y--0.500.10
Complex AnalysisMAT389H1F3-10.50
Winter Session-Year 3Lect.Lab.Tut.Wgt.
Systems SoftwareECE353H1S33-0.50
Linear Systems and ControlECE356H1S31.5010.50
Engineering Science Option SeminarESC301Y1Y--0.500.10
One ECE Elective .S---0.50
Three Of:
Communication SystemsECE316H1S31.5010.50
Semiconductor Electronic DevicesECE350H1S31.5010.50
Electronic CircuitsECE354H1S31.500.500.50
Electromagnetic FieldsECE357H1S31.5010.50
Foundations of ComputingECE358H1S3-10.50

1. Students cannot take ECE350H1 and ECE358H1 in the same semester.
2. Students may take CHE374H1 in 4F but are recommended to take it in 3F.

YEAR 4 ELECTRICAL AND COMPUTER ENGINEERING

Year 4Lect.Lab.Tut.Wgt.
ThesisESC499Y1Y32-1.00
Digital Signal ProcessingECE455H1F31.5010.50
Two (2) Complementary Studies ElectivesF/S/Y 1.00
Two (2) ECE electives and Two (2) ECE or Technical ElectivesF/S 2.00
and one of:
Digital Systems DesignECE532H1S33-0.50
Energy Systems Capstone DesignESC470H1S--50.50
Electrical and Computer Capstone DesignESC472H1S--50.50

1. While a full-year thesis is recommended, students may substitute with a half-year thesis and an ECE or Technical elective.
2. ECE electives or Technical electives can be taken in Year 3 or Year 4 provided that course pre-requisites have been met. Contact the Division of Engineering Science for clarification of course pre-requisites.
3. Students who completed ECE455H1 (formerly offered as ECE362H1: Digital Signals Processing) prior to September 2013 will instead be completing: ESC499Y1, Two (2) Complementary Studies Electives, Three (3) ECE Electives, Two (2) ECE or Technical Electives and one of: ECE532H1, ESC470H1 and ESC472H1

ECE Electives

ECE ElectivesLect.Lab.Tut.Wgt.
Photonics and Semiconductor Physics
Fundamentals of OpticsECE318H1S31.5010.50
Semiconductor Electronic DevicesECE350H1S31.5010.50
Introduction to Micro- and Nano-Fabrication TechnologiesECE442H1F3210.50
Optical Communications and NetworksECE469H1S31.5010.50
Lasers and DetectorsECE525H1S3-20.50
Photonic DevicesECE527H1F3-20.50
Quantum Mechanics IPHY356H1F2-10.50
Quantum Mechanics IIPHY456H1F2-10.50
Condensed Matter PhysicsPHY487H1F2--0.50
ECE ElectivesLect.Lab.Tut.Wgt.
Control, Communications, Signal Processing
Medical ImagingBME595H1S2310.50
Communication SystemsECE316H1F/S31.5010.50
Real-Time Computer ControlECE411H1S31.5010.50
Digital CommunicationECE417H1S31.5010.50
Neural BioelectricityECE445H1F31.5010.50
Sensory CommunicationECE446H1F31.5010.50
Multimedia SystemsECE462H1S32-0.50
Wireless CommunicationECE464H1S31.5010.50
Robot Modeling and ControlECE470H1S31.5010.50
Intelligent Image ProcessingECE516H1S33-0.50
Inference AlgorithmsECE521H1S3-20.50
Random ProcessesECE537H1F3-20.50
Systems ControlECE557H1F31.5010.50

ECE Electives

ECE ElectivesLect.Lab.Tut.Wgt.
Electromagnetics and Energy Systems
Electromagnetic FieldsECE357H1S31.5010.50
Energy Systems and Distributed GenerationECE413H1S31.5010.50
Radio and Microwave Wireless SystemsECE422H1S31.5010.50
Electric DrivesECE463H1S31.5010.50
Introduction to Lighting SystemsECE510H1F3-20.50
Power Electronics: Converter TopologiesECE514H1F31.5010.50
Microwave CircuitsECE524H1F31.5010.50
Power Electronics: Switch-Mode Power SuppliesECE533H1F3110.50
Computer Hardware and Computer Networks
Computer Networks IECE361H1F/S31.5010.50
InternetworkingECE461H1F31.500.500.50
Computer Networks IIECE466H1S31.5010.50
Computer ArchitectureECE552H1F31.5010.50
ECE ElectivesLect.Lab.Tut.Wgt.
Analog and Digital Electronics
Digital ElectronicsECE334H1F/S31.5010.50
Semiconductor Electronic DevicesECE350H1S31.5010.50
Electronic CircuitsECE354H1S31.500.500.50
VLSI Systems and DesignECE451H1S33-0.50
Analog Signal Processing CircuitsECE512H1F3-20.50
Analog Integrated CircuitsECE530H1S31.5010.50
Integrated Circuit EngineeringECE534H1F33-0.50
Advanced Electronic DevicesECE535H1F31.5010.50

ECE Electives

ECE ElectivesLect.Lab.Tut.Wgt.
Software
Programming on the WebCSC309H1F/S2-10.50
The Design of Interactive Computational MediaCSC318H1F/S2-10.50
Programming LanguagesCSC326H1F31.5010.50
Introduction to DatabasesCSC343H1F/S2-10.50
Introduction to Artificial IntelligenceCSC384H1F/S2-10.50
Natural Language ComputingCSC401H1S2-10.50
Machine Learning and Data MiningCSC411H1F2-10.50
Computer GraphicsCSC418H1F/S2-10.50
Human-Computer InteractionCSC428H1S2-10.50
ECE ElectivesLect.Lab.Tut.Wgt.
Software (continued)
Database System TechnologyCSC443H1S2-10.50
Software Engineering ICSC444H1F31.5010.50
Compilers and InterpretersCSC467H1F31.5010.50
Foundations of ComputingECE358H1S3-10.50
Distributed SystemsECE419H1S31.5010.50
Software Engineering IIECE450H1S31.5010.50
Computer Systems ProgrammingECE454H1F33-0.50
InternetworkingECE461H1F31.500.500.50
Inference AlgorithmsECE521H1S3-20.50
Optimizing CompilersECE540H1S33-0.50
Computer SecurityECE568H1S33-0.50

Technical Electives

Technical ElectivesLect.Lab.Tut.Wgt.
ECE Electives, or any of the following:
Scientific ComputingAER336H1S3-10.50
Introduction to Fusion EnergyAER507H1F3-10.50
RoboticsAER525H1F31.5010.50
Partial Differential EquationsAPM384H1F3-10.50
Groups and SymmetriesMAT301H1F/S3--0.50
Elements of Analysis MAT336H1S3--0.50
Structure and Characterization of Nanostructured MaterialsMSE358H1S31.5010.50
Physics of the EarthPHY395H1S2-10.50
OPTION ENERGY SYSTEMS ENGINEERING (AEESCBASEJ)

YEAR 3 ENERGY SYSTEMS ENGINEERING

Fall Session - Year 3Lect.Lab.Tut.Wgt.
Chemical Processes for Energy Generation and StorageCHE308H1F3-10.50
Economic Analysis and Decision MakingCHE374H1F3-10.50
Introduction to Energy SystemsECE349H1F31.5010.50
Terrestrial Energy SystemsENV346H1F3-30.50
Engineering Science Option SeminarESC301Y1Y--0.500.10
Mechanical and Thermal Energy Conversion ProcessesMIE303H1F31.5010.50
Winter Session - Year 3Lect.Lab.Tut.Wgt.
Control SystemsAER372H1S31.5010.50
Energy PolicyAPS305H1S3-10.50
Design of Hydro and Wind Electric PlantsCIV301H1S3-20.50
Energy Systems and Distributed GenerationECE413H1S31.5010.50
Electric DrivesECE463H1S31.5010.50
Engineering Science Option SeminarESC301Y1Y--0.500.10

YEAR 4 ENERGY SYSTEMS ENGINEERING

Fall Session - Year 4Lect.Lab.Tut.Wgt.
ThesisESC499Y1Y32-1.00
Free ElectiveF/Y 0.50
one of two:
Introduction to Lighting SystemsECE510H1F3-20.50
Power Electronics: Converter TopologiesECE514H1F31.5010.50
and two of:
Introduction to Fusion EnergyAER507H1F3-10.50
Petroleum ProcessingCHE451H1F3-10.50
Aqueous Process EngineeringCHE565H1F3-10.50
Introduction to Nuclear EngineeringCHE566H1F3-10.50
Studies in Building ScienceCIV575H1F3-20.50
Photonic DevicesECE527H1F3-20.50
Machine DesignMIE442H1F31.5030.50
Alternative Energy SystemsMIE515H1F3-10.50
Combustion and FuelsMIE516H1F3-10.50
Winter Session - Year 4Lect.Lab.Tut.Wgt.
ThesisESC499Y1Y32-1.00
Energy Systems Capstone DesignESC470H1S--50.50
Complementary Studies ElectiveS 0.50
and two of:
Advanced Reactor DesignCHE412H1S3-10.50
Fuel Cells and Electrochemical Conversion DevicesCHE469H1S3-10.50
Nuclear EngineeringCHE568H1S3-10.50
Environmental Impact and Risk AssessmentCIV440H1S3-10.50
Sustainable BuildingsCIV576H1S3-10.50
Power Electronics: Switch-Mode Power SuppliesECE533H1S3110.50
Bioenergy from Sustainable Forest ManagementFOR310H1S2-10.50
Bioenergy and Biorefinery TechnologyFOR425H1S2-20.50
Design for the EnvironmentMIE315H1S3-10.50
Nuclear Reactor Theory and DesignMIE407H1S3-20.50
* Thermal and Machine Design of Nuclear Power ReactorsMIE408H1S3-20.50
Fuel Cell SystemsMIE517H1S3-10.50
Nanotechnology in Alternate Energy SystemsMSE558H1S30.5010.50
Physics of the EarthPHY395H1S2-10.50
1. APS305H1, a core course within the Energy curriculum, counts towards the Complementary Studies requirement.
OPTION ENGINEERING MATHEMATICS, STATISTICS & FINANCE (AEESCBASEF)

Year 3 ENGINEERING MATHEMATICS, STATISTICS & FINANCE

Fall Session - Year 3Lect.Lab.Tut.Wgt.
Partial Differential EquationsAPM384H1F3-10.50
Economic Analysis and Decision MakingCHE374H1F3-10.50
Financial EngineeringMIE375H1F3-10.50
Methods of Data Analysis ISTA302H1F3--0.50
ProbabilitySTA347H1F3--0.50
Engineering Science Option SeminarESC301Y1Y--0.500.10
Winter Session - Year 3Lect.Lab.Tut.Wgt.
Financial Principles for Actuarial Science II ACT370H1S3--0.50
Engineering Finance and EconomicsCHE375H1S3-10.50
Elements of Analysis MAT336H1S3--0.50
Mathematical Programming (Optimization) MIE376H1S3210.50
Financial Optimization Models MIE377H1S3110.50
Engineering Science Option SeminarESC301Y1Y--0.500.10

Year 4 ENGINEERING MATHEMATICS, STATISTICS & FINANCE

Year 4Lect.Lab.Tut.Wgt.
ThesisESC499Y1Y32-1.00
Stochastic Methods for Actuarial Science ACT460H1F3--0.50
Engineering Mathematics, Statistics and Finance Capstone DesignMIE479H1F--50.50
Two (2) Complementary Studies ElectivesF/S/Y 1.00
Four (4) Technical Elective (Methodologies & Tools or Domain Courses)F/S/Y 2.00

Methodologies and Tools

ElectivesLect.Lab.Tut.Wgt.
Random ProcessesECE537H1F3-20.50
Systems Modelling and SimulationMIE360H1F3210.50
Operations Research III: Advanced ORMIE365H1F3210.50
SchedulingMIE562H1F3-20.50
Decision AnalysisMIE566H1F3-20.50
Fixed Income SecuritiesRSM430H1F2--0.50
Financial Trading Strategies (formerly RSM412H1 Financial Trading Strategies) RSM434H1F2--0.50
Statistical ComputationSTA410H1F3--0.50
ElectivesLect.Lab.Tut.Wgt.
Scientific ComputingAER336H1S3-10.50
Mathematical Theory of FinanceAPM466H1S3--0.50
Modelling in Biological and Chemical SystemsCHE471H1S3-10.50
Data-based Modelling for Prediction and ControlCHE507H1S3-10.50
Foundations of ComputingECE358H1S3-10.50
Inference AlgorithmsECE521H1S3-20.50
Cases in Operations ResearchMIE367H1S3-20.50
Knowledge Modelling and ManagementMIE457H1S3110.50
Risk Management for Financial ManagersRSM432H1S2--0.50
Financial Trading Strategies (formerly RSM412H1 Financial Trading Strategies) RSM434H1S2--0.50
Stochastic Processes (formerly STA348H1)STA447H1S3--0.50

Domain Courses

ElectivesLect.Lab.Tut.Wgt.
Aerospace
DynamicsAER301H1F3-10.50
AerodynamicsAER307H1F3-10.50
Mechanics of Solids and StructuresAER373H1S3-10.50
Biomedical
Biomedical Systems Engineering I: Organ SystemsBME350H1S34-0.50
Biomedical Systems Engineering II: Cells and TissuesBME395H1F3-20.50
Electrical and Computer
Introduction to Energy SystemsECE349H1F31.5010.50
Computer OrganizationECE352H1F33-0.50
Systems SoftwareECE353H1S33-0.50
Signal Analysis and CommunicationECE355H1F3-20.50
ElectronicsECE360H1F31.5010.50
ElectivesLect.Lab.Tut.Wgt.
Energy and the Environment
Innovative Technologies and Organizations in Global Energy SystemsAPS510H1F3-10.50
Chemical Processes for Energy Generation and StorageCHE308H1F3-10.50
Terrestrial Energy SystemsCIV300H1F/S3-20.50
Design of Hydro and Wind Electric PlantsCIV301H1S3-20.50
Environmental Impact and Risk AssessmentCIV440H1S3-10.50
Mechanical and Thermal Energy Conversion ProcessesMIE303H1F31.5010.50
Design for the EnvironmentMIE315H1S3-10.50
Alternative Energy SystemsMIE515H1F3-10.50

Domain Courses

ElectivesLect.Lab.Tut.Wgt.
Infrastructure
Structural Design 1CIV352H1F3-20.50
Structural Design 2CIV357H1S3-20.50
Intelligent Transportation SystemsCIV359H1S3-10.50
Engineering Project Finance and ManagementCIV460H1F3-10.50
Public Transit Operations and PlanningCIV516H1S3-10.50
Transport PlanningCIV531H1F3-10.50
Mining
Geotechnical Engineering ICME321H1F30.5010.50
Mineral Reserve and Mineral Resource EstimationMIN401H1S3-10.50
Mining Environmental ManagementMIN430H1S3-10.50
ElectivesLect.Lab.Tut.Wgt.
Manufacturing
RoboticsAER525H1F31.5010.50
Risk Based Safety ManagementCHE561H1S3-10.50
Manufacturing EngineeringMIE221H1S3210.50
Automated ManufacturingMIE422H1F23-0.50
* Design of Innovative ProductsMIE440H1F2210.50
Reliability and Maintainability EngineeringMIE469H1S3-20.50
* Product DesignMIE540H1S3-10.50

1. Students may take a half-year thesis and an additional 0.5 credit from the electives list instead of a full-year thesis.

OPTION INFRASTRUCTURE ENGINEERING (AEESCBASEI)

YEAR 3 INFRASTRUCTURE ENGINEERING

Fall Session - Year 3Lect.Lab.Tut.Wgt.
Economic Analysis and Decision MakingCHE374H1F3-10.50
Structural Design 1CIV352H1F3-20.50
Urban Operations ResearchCIV355H1F3-20.50
Transport PlanningCIV531H1F3-10.50
Geotechnical Engineering ICME321H1F30.5010.50
Engineering Science Option SeminarESC301Y1Y--0.500.10
Winter Session - Year 3Lect.Lab.Tut.Wgt.
Mechanics of Solids and StructuresAER373H1S3-10.50
Structural Design 2CIV357H1S3-20.50
Intelligent Transportation SystemsCIV359H1S3-10.50
Public Transit Operations and PlanningCIV516H1S3-10.50
Engineering Science Option SeminarESC301Y1Y--0.500.10
Complementary Studies ElectiveS 0.50

YEAR 4 INFRASTRUCTURE ENGINEERING

Fall Session - Year 4Lect.Lab.Tut.Wgt.
Collaborative Design Project ICIV455H1F13-0.50
Engineering Project Finance and ManagementCIV460H1F3-10.50
ThesisESC499H1F32-0.50
Specialty Elective 1 F 0.50
Technical ElectiveF 0.50
Take any one from the following:
Transportation Specialty
Technology in Society and the Biosphere IAPS301H1F3-10.50
Management of ConstructionCIV280H1F3-20.50
Travel Survey MethodsCIV1520HF2-20.50
Alternative Energy SystemsMIE515H1F3-10.50
Structures Specialty
Reinforced Concrete IICIV416H1F3-20.50
Concrete TechnologyCIV514H1F3-20.50
Introduction to Structural DynamicsCIV515H1F3-10.50
Prestressed ConcreteCIV517H1F3--0.50
Studies in Building ScienceCIV575H1F3-20.50
Mechanics of Reinforced ConcreteCIV1163HF3--0.50
Winter Session - Year 4Lect.Lab.Tut.Wgt.
Collaborative Design Project IICIV456H1S13-0.50
Specialty Elective 2S 0.50
Specialty Elective 3S 0.50
Specialty Elective 4S 0.50
Complementary Studies ElectiveS 0.50
Take any three from the following:
Transportation Specialty
Sustainable Energy SystemsCIV380H1S3-10.50
Infrastructure for Sustainable CitiesCIV577H1S3-10.50
Infrastructure EconomicsCIV1310HS2--0.50
SimulationCIV1337HS2--0.50
Freight Transportation and ITS ApplicationsCIV1506HS2--0.50
Airport PlanningCIV1508HS2--0.50
Transportation and DevelopmentCIV1535HS2--0.50
Transportation Demand AnalysisCIV1538HS2--0.50
Structures Specialty
Solid Mechanics IICIV510H1S3-20.50
Behaviour and Design of Steel StructuresCIV518H1S3-20.50
Geotechnical DesignCIV523H1S3-10.50
Sustainable BuildingsCIV576H1S3-10.50
Bridge EngineeringCIV1164HS2--0.50
Principles of Earthquake Engineering and Seismic DesignCIV1171HS3--0.50
Finite Element Methods in Structural MechanicsCIV1174HS3--0.50

1. Students who do not wish to specialize may take courses from either the Transportation or Structures List.
2. Students wanting to take a full-year thesis are only required to take three specialty electives.
3. CIV1508H1, CIV1337H1, CIV1535H1 and CIV1538H1 are offered every other year. Please contact the Division of Engineering Science for more information on the scheduling of these courses.
4. The technical elective may be freely chosen from any 400 or 500 level course offered in Engineering provided students have taken the pre-requisite course. Other non-Engineering courses may be taken with the approval of the Division of Engineering Science. There are also 1000 level courses offered by the Department of Civil Engineering and available to Engineering Science students. Consult the Department of Civil Engineering website for a description of 1000 level CIV courses.

OPTION NANOENGINEERING (AEESCBASEO)

YEAR 3 NANOENGINEERING

Fall Session - Year 3Lect.Lab.Tut.Wgt.
Economic Analysis and Decision MakingCHE374H1F3-10.50
Physical and Inorganic ChemistryCHE390H1F3-10.50
Organic Chemistry and BiochemistryCHE391H1F31.5010.50
Quantum Mechanics IPHY356H1F2-10.50
Engineering Science Option SeminarESC301Y1Y--0.500.10
and one of:
Partial Differential EquationsAPM384H1F3-10.50
Complex AnalysisMAT389H1F3-10.50
Winter Session - Year 3Lect.Lab.Tut.Wgt.
Introduction to Inorganic and Polymer Materials ChemistryCHM325H1S2--0.50
Semiconductor Electronic DevicesECE350H1S31.5010.50
Structure and Characterization of Nanostructured MaterialsMSE358H1S31.5010.50
Advanced Physics LaboratoryPHY327H1S-6-0.50
Atoms, Molecules and SolidsPHY358H1S2-10.50
Engineering Science Option SeminarESC301Y1Y--0.500.10

YEAR 4 NANOENGINEERING

Fall Session - Year 4Lect.Lab.Tut.Wgt.
ThesisESC499Y1Y32-1.00
Engineering Science Capstone DesignESC471H1F--50.50
Synthesis of Nanostructured MaterialsMSE459H1F32-0.50
Complementary Studies ElectiveF/Y 0.50
and one of:
Biomedical Systems Engineering II: Cells and TissuesBME395H1F3-20.50
Environmental EngineeringCHE467H1F3-10.50
Chemical Properties of PolymersCHE562H1F3-10.50
Advanced Materials ChemistryCHM434H1F2--0.50
Introduction to Micro- and Nano-Fabrication TechnologiesECE442H1F3210.50
Neural BioelectricityECE445H1F31.5010.50
Photonic DevicesECE527H1F3-20.50
Complex AnalysisMAT389H1F3-10.50
Alternative Energy SystemsMIE515H1F3-10.50
Electronic MaterialsMSE430H1F2-10.50
Advanced Physics LaboratoryPHY427H1F-6-0.50
Advanced Classical OpticsPHY485H1F2--0.50
Condensed Matter PhysicsPHY487H1F2--0.50
Other Technical ElectiveF 0.50
Winter Session - Year 4Lect.Lab.Tut.Wgt.
ThesisESC499Y1Y32-1.00
Materials Physics IIMSE462H1S2-10.50
Complementary Studies ElectiveS/Y 0.50
and two of:
Organic Materials ChemistryCHM446H1S2--0.50
Fundamentals of OpticsECE318H1S31.5010.50
Linear Systems and ControlECE356H1S31.5010.50
Lasers and DetectorsECE525H1S3-20.50
Biomaterials and BiocompatibilityMSE352H1S3-10.50
Forensic EngineeringMSE431H1S3-10.50
Advanced Physical Properties of Structural NanomaterialsMSE550H1S3210.50
Nanotechnology in Alternate Energy SystemsMSE558H1S30.5010.50
Advanced Physics LaboratoryPHY427H1S-6-0.50
Statistical MechanicsPHY452H1S2--0.50
Other Technical ElectiveS 0.50

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

OPTION ENGINEERING PHYSICS (AEESCBASEP)

YEAR 3 ENGINEERING PHYSICS

Fall Session Year 3Lect.Lab.Tut.Wgt.
Economic Analysis and Decision MakingCHE374H1F3-10.50
ElectronicsECE360H1F31.5010.50
Advanced Physics LaboratoryPHY327H1F-6-0.50
Quantum Mechanics IPHY356H1F2-10.50
Engineering Science Option SeminarESC301Y1Y--0.500.10
At least one of:
Partial Differential EquationsAPM384H1F3-10.50
Complex AnalysisMAT389H1F3-10.50
Winter Session- Year 3Lect.Lab.Tut.Wgt.
Electromagnetic FieldsECE357H1S31.5010.50
Classical MechanicsPHY354H1S2-10.50
Engineering Science Option SeminarESC301Y1Y--0.500.10
Four (4) Group A ElectivesS 2.00

1.It is highly recommended that students take one of ECE342H1, ECE350H1, ECE455H1, MSE358H1 or CHE568H1 to reduce accreditation constraints in Year 4.
2. Students who take 3 Group A electives in the Winter Session must complete 1 Group A elective in the Fall Session.  Students must obtain a total of 5.6 credits in Year 3.
3. Students must take PHY427H1 in 3S, 4F, or 4S.
4. Students may take APM346H1 in place of APM384H1.  
5. Students may take MAT334H1 in place of MAT389H1.
6. Students may take CHE374H1 in 4F.

YEAR 4 ENGINEERING PHYSICS

YEAR 4Lect.Lab.Tut.Wgt.
ThesisESC499Y1Y32-1.00
Engineering Science Capstone DesignESC471H1F--50.50
Two (2) Complementary Studies electivesF/S/Y 1.00
YEAR 4Lect.Lab.Tut.Wgt.
Three (3) electives from Group BF/S 1.50
Two (2) electives from Groups A or BF/S 1.00

Group A and B Electives

Group A ElectivesLect.Lab.Tut.Wgt.
Introduction to Fusion EnergyAER507H1F3-10.50
Partial Differential EquationsAPM384H1F3-10.50
Introduction to AstrophysicsAST320H1S2--0.50
Introduction to Practical AstronomyAST325H1F-3-0.50
Nuclear EngineeringCHE568H1S3-10.50
Fundamentals of OpticsECE318H1S31.5010.50
Computer HardwareECE342H1S33-0.50
Semiconductor Electronic DevicesECE350H1S31.5010.50
Digital Signal ProcessingECE455H1F31.5010.50
Lasers and DetectorsECE525H1S3-20.50
Photonic DevicesECE527H1F3-20.50
Groups and SymmetriesMAT301H1F/S3--0.50
Elements of Analysis MAT336H1S3--0.50
Complex AnalysisMAT389H1F3-10.50
Polynomial Equations and FieldsMAT401H1F3--0.50
Classical GeometriesMAT402H1S3--0.50
Structure and Characterization of Nanostructured MaterialsMSE358H1S31.5010.50
Nuclear and Particle PhysicsPHY357H1S2-10.50
Atoms, Molecules and SolidsPHY358H1S2-10.50
Physics of ClimatePHY392H1S2--0.50
Physics of the EarthPHY395H1S2-10.50
Times Series AnalysisPHY408H1S12-0.50
Advanced Physics LaboratoryPHY427H1F/S-6-0.50
Advanced Practical Physics IIPHY428H1F/S-6-0.50
Advanced Practical Physics IIIPHY429H1F/S-6-0.50
Relativity Theory IIPHY484H1S2--0.50
Group B ElectivesLect.Lab.Tut.Wgt.
Computational PhysicsPHY407H1F13-0.50
Relativistic Electrodynamics PHY450H1S2-10.50
Statistical MechanicsPHY452H1S2--0.50
Continuum Mechanics PHY454H1S2-10.50
Quantum Mechanics IIPHY456H1F2-10.50
Nonlinear PhysicsPHY460H1S2--0.50
Relativity Theory IPHY483H1F2--0.50
Advanced Classical OpticsPHY485H1F2--0.50
Condensed Matter PhysicsPHY487H1F2--0.50
Introduction to High Energy PhysicsPHY489H1F2--0.50
Advanced Atmospheric PhysicsPHY492H1F2--0.50
SeismologyPHY493H1S2--0.50
Geophysical Imaging: EM and Potential FieldsPHY494H1F2--0.50
Research Topic in GeophysicsPHY495H1F2--0.50

Materials Science and Engineering

UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAM IN MATERIALS ENGINEERING (AEMMSBASC)

UNDERGRADUATE STUDENT COUNSELLOR:
Ms Maria Fryman
Room 140, Wallberg Building 416-978-1374  
Email: maria.fryman@utoronto.ca

The goal of the materials engineering undergraduate curriculum is to provide an understanding of the underlying principles of synthesis, characterization and processing of materials and of the interrelationships among structure, properties, and processing.   The program prepares students for professional careers in a wide variety of industries, as well as for advanced study in this field. It also provides students with the opportunity to broaden their education in engineering and science or to expand their knowledge in a particular technical area by offering course foundations in four core areas: nanomaterials, materials in manufacturing, biomaterials, materials processing and sustainable development.


The first year of the program establishes basic fundamentals in math, chemistry, and physics with an introduction to design, communications, and societal issues in Engineering.  In the second year, the students are introduced to the structural and analytical characterization of materials, electrical and quantum mechanical properties of matter, thermodynamics, fundamentals and processing of organic and inorganic materials, engineering statistics and materials selection in design. The third year is devoted to a series of introductory courses in the four theme areas.  Other courses include heat and mass transfer, phase transformations, process design, mechanical behaviour and environmental degradation of materials.  The fourth year focuses on in-depth study of the selected theme areas plus an additional materials selection in design course.  The fourth year also culminates in a senior design course in which the students integrate the knowledge obtained during their prior studies.  The technical aspects of the curriculum are complemented by communication, humanities and social sciences courses and by material on leadership, ethics, team building and environmental responsibility that are distributed throughout the curriculum.

For those students interested in pursuing an Engineering Minor, please read the detailed information provided at the beginning of this chapter.  By selecting courses which meet both MSE requirements and the requirements of the respective Minor, it is possible for a student to complete a Minor during the normal course of study.

For those students interested in pursuing the Jeffrey Skoll BASc/MBA (SKOLL) Program, please read the detailed information provided at the beginning of this chapter.

 

FIRST YEAR MATERIALS ENGINEERING

Fall Session - Year 1Lect.Lab.Tut.Wgt.
Engineering Strategies & Practice IAPS111H1F3110.50
Ethics in EngineeringAPS150H1F--10.05
MechanicsCIV100H1F3-20.50
Calculus IMAT186H1F3-10.50
Linear AlgebraMAT188H1F3-10.50
Introduction to Materials ScienceMSE101H1F3110.50
Winter Session - Year 1Lect.Lab.Tut.Wgt.
Fundamentals of Computer ProgrammingAPS106H1S3210.50
Engineering Strategies & Practice IIAPS112H1S32-0.50
Physical ChemistryCHE112H1S3110.50
Electrical FundamentalsECE110H1S3120.50
Calculus IIMAT187H1S3-10.50

SECOND YEAR MATERIALS ENGINEERING

Fall Session - Year 2Lect.Lab.Tut.Wgt.
Calculus and Differential EquationsMAT294H1F3-20.50
ThermodynamicsMSE202H1F3-20.50
Structure and Characterization of MaterialsMSE219H1F3310.50
Inorganic Materials Chemistry and ProcessingMSE244H1F3210.50
Humanities/Complementary Studies ElectiveF 0.50
Winter Session - Year 2Lect.Lab.Tut.Wgt.
Diffusion and KineticsMSE217H1S3-20.50
Materials PhysicsMSE235H1S3-10.50
Engineering StatisticsMSE238H1S3-20.25
Organic Materials Chemistry and PropertiesMSE245H1S3210.50
Materials Selection in Design IMSE250H1S2210.25
Communications IMSE290H1S1-10.25
Humanities/Complementary Studies ElectiveS 0.50

Practical Experience Requirement - As described in the beginning pages of this chapter, students are required to have completed a total of 600 hours of acceptable practical experience, before graduation, (normally acquired during summer vacation periods).

 

 

ENGINEERING SUMMER INTERNSHIP PROGRAM (eSIP) PROGRAM

The Engineering Summer Internship Program (eSIP) is a paid summer co-op program offered through the Engineering Career Centre.  It is available to eligible engineering students in year 2 or 3 of study, including engineering international students. eSIP is more akin to a traditional co-op placement, where students work for four months and thus serves as an introductory career development program for participants. Through formalized and interactive workshops and individual counseling appointments, students are introduced to concepts and tools to prepare them for the workplace.  The majority of applicants are in their year 2 of study, for which eSIP holds particular value in preparing students to be competitive for future opportunities, such as the intensive model of the PEY internship.

PROFESSIONAL EXPERIENCE YEAR

Students registered within this program, and all other undergraduate programs within the Faculty of Applied Science and Engineering, may elect to enrol and participate in the Professional Experience Year (PEY) program. The PEY program requires that qualified students undertake a paid, full-time 12-16 month continuous work period with a cooperating industry. Details are described in the beginning of this chapter. For more information, consult the Professional Experience Year Office, 222 College Street, Suite 106.

THIRD YEAR MATERIALS ENGINEERING

Fall Session - Year 3Lect.Lab.Tut.Wgt.
Engineering Economics and AccountingMIE258H1F3-10.50
Phase TransformationsMSE318H1F3310.50
Heat and Mass Transfer for Materials ProcessingMSE332H1F3-20.50
NanomaterialsMSE342H1F2-10.25
BiomaterialsMSE343H1F2-10.25
Communications IIMSE390H1F1-10.25
Humanities/Complementary StudiesF 0.50
Winter Session - Year 3Lect.Lab.Tut.Wgt.
Environmental Degradation of MaterialsMSE315H1S3-20.50
Mechanical Behaviour of MaterialsMSE316H1S3310.50
Design and Simulation of Materials ProcessesMSE351H1S3210.50
Materials in ManufacturingMSE354H1S2-10.25
Materials Processing and Sustainable DevelopmentMSE355H1S2-10.25
Humanities/Complementary StudiesS 0.50

HSS/CS Requirement - In order to fulfill degree and Canadian Engineering Accreditation Board (CEAB) requirements, each student must take a total of 4 half year (or 2 full year) Complementary Studies (CS) Electives.  Two of those CS electives must be Humanities/Social Sciences (HSS) courses.  In MSE, these courses are taken in 2nd and 3rd years.  (Note: Students may choose to take technical electives in 3rd year instead; and, then take their HSS/CS courses in 4th year.)  Since students are responsible for ensuring that each HSS/CS elective taken is an approved course, be sure to consult the electives list on the APSC Registrar’s website.

Canadian Engineering Accreditation Board (CEAB) Requirements

In order to complete the MSE Program of Study, students are responsible for ensuring that they have taken all the required core courses, the correct number of Technical Electives (in accordance with Theme requirements), HSS/CS electives (total 1.0 credit of each) and a Free Elective. 

To satisfy the CEAB requirements, students must accumulate, during their studies, a minimum total number of "accreditation units" (AUs) as well as a minimum number of AUs in six specific categories: complementary studies, mathematics, natural science, engineering science, engineering design, and combined engineering science & design.  MSE now provides students with a planning tool, the "AU Tracker", to help students  to ensure that all requirements are met. Using the AU Tracker, a student can list all successfully completed courses, as well as all the courses enrolled in for the current academic year.  The Tracker confirms whether or not students are on track to meet or exceed the CEAB requirements.

FOURTH YEAR MATERIALS ENGINEERING

Fall Session - Year 4Lect.Lab.Tut.Wgt.
Materials Selection in Design IIMSE401H1F2210.50
Plant Design for Materials Process IndustriesMSE450H1F2-30.50
Professional Ethics and PracticeMSE490H1F1--0.25
Design and Research ProjectMSE498Y1Y3621.00
Technical ElectiveF 0.50
Technical ElectiveF 0.50
Winter Session - Year 4Lect.Lab.Tut.Wgt.
Design and Research ProjectMSE498Y1Y3621.00
Technical ElectiveS 0.50
Technical ElectiveS 0.50
Technical ElectiveS 0.50
Free ElectiveS 0.50
4th Year Themes and Technical Electives

The 5 required Technical Electives selected must include courses from at least 2 of the themes listed below.  Note that, of the 5 courses, at least 2 of those courses must be selected from a single theme.  A minimum of 3 courses must be chosen from the MSE themes.
A maximum of 2 Technical Electives may be chosen from other Engineering departments, with the prior approval of the MSE Associate Chair, Undergraduate Studies.  Note that all courses may not be offered every year.

Biomaterials Theme:

Fall Session - Year 4Lect.Lab.Tut.Wgt.
Biomaterial Processing and PropertiesMSE440H1F3-10.50
Engineering BiologyCHE353H1F3-10.50
Chemical Properties of PolymersCHE562H1F3-10.50
Winter Session - Year 4Lect.Lab.Tut.Wgt.
Surgical and Dental Implant DesignMSE442H1S3-10.50
Cellular and Molecular BiologyCHE354H1S3-20.50

Materials for Manufacturing Theme:

Fall Session - Year 4Lect.Lab.Tut.Wgt.
Introduction to Micro- and Nano-Fabrication TechnologiesECE442H1F3210.50
Introduction to Polymer EngineeringMSE330H1F3-10.50
Fracture and Failure AnalysisMSE419H1F3-10.50
Engineered CeramicsMSE561H1F3-20.50
Winter Session - Year 4Lect.Lab.Tut.Wgt.
Solid State Processing and Surface TreatmentMSE421H1S3-20.50
Forensic EngineeringMSE431H1S3-10.50

Materials Processing for Sustainable Development Theme:

Fall Session - Year 4Lect.Lab.Tut.Wgt.
Extractive MetallurgyMSE504H1F3-20.50
Aqueous Process EngineeringCHE565H1F3-10.50
Winter Session - Year 4Lect.Lab.Tut.Wgt.
Energy Management in Materials ProcessingMSE408H1S3-10.50
Process Simulation and Computer DesignMSE455H1S3-20.50

Nanomaterials Theme:

Fall Session - Year 4Lect.Lab.Tut.Wgt.
Introduction to Micro- and Nano-Fabrication TechnologiesECE442H1F3210.50
Electronic MaterialsMSE430H1F2-10.50
Synthesis of Nanostructured MaterialsMSE459H1F32-0.50
Winter Session - Year 4Lect.Lab.Tut.Wgt.
Advanced Physical Properties of Structural NanomaterialsMSE550H1S3210.50
Nanotechnology in Alternate Energy SystemsMSE558H1S30.5010.50
GRADUATE PROGRAMS IN MATERIALS SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING

The Graduate Department of Materials Science and Engineering offers M.Eng., M.A.Sc., or Ph.D. degrees in extractive and physical metallurgy, materials science, nanomaterials, electronic and photonic materials and biomaterials.   Detailed information on admission is available from the Undergraduate/Graduate Counsellor.

The research equipment includes modern facilities for optical, electron and X-ray microscopy, mechanical testing, particle characterization, the production of high temperatures and controlled atmospheres, calorimetric and other thermodynamic measurements at high temperatures, crystal growth, etc.

Research interests in the Department include process development, computer-aided materials engineering, physical chemistry of metal extraction, mineral processing, hydrometallurgy, electrometallurgy, powder metallurgy, solidification and crystal growth, welding, structure and mechanical properties of metallic, ceramic and composite materials, high strength polymers, nuclear materials, electronic and photonic materials, nanostructured materials and synthesis and design of biomaterials.

Mechanical and Industrial Engineering

INDUSTRIAL ENGINEERING (AEINDBASC)

(Offered by the Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering. For a listing of Academic Staff in the Department, please refer to Chapter 1).

UNDERGRADUATE STUDENT COUNSELLOR:
Ms. Carla Baptista
Room MC109, Mechanical Engineering Building 
416-978-6420

Industrial Engineering (IE) is a discipline that applies engineering principles to the design and operation of organizations. Industrial Engineering students learn to analyze, design, implement, control, evaluate, and improve the performance of complex organizations, taking into consideration people, technology, and information systems. Industrial engineers use operations research, information engineering, and human factors tools and methods to improve and optimize systems operations and performance.
Industrial engineers share the common goal of increasing an organization’s efficiency, profitability and safety in a variety of industries including health care, finance, retail, entertainment, government, information technology, transportation, energy, manufacturing, and consulting. Unlike traditional disciplines in engineering and the mathematical sciences, IE addresses the role of the human decision-maker as a key contributor to the inherent complexity of systems and the primary benefactor of the analyses.
Industrial Engineering bears close resemblance to: Management Science, Management Engineering, Operations Research, Operations Management, and Systems Engineering.
The objective of the Industrial Engineering program curriculum is to educate engineers who:
  • Employ effective analysis and design tools;
  • Integrate perspectives into a systems view of the organization; and
  • Understand both the theory and the practice of Industrial Engineering.

In the first two years of the curriculum, emphasis is placed on fundamental principles of engineering and core industrial engineering concepts. Tools taught in second year include: probability, psychology for engineers, fundamentals of object oriented programming, engineering economics and accounting, operations research, differential equations, statistics, human centered systems design, and data modeling.
In the third year, students learn various perspectives on the operation of organizations, including productivity, information, ergonomics, and economics.  They also select technical electives allowing them to specialize in information engineering, operations research and human factors, and investigate other IE areas such as business process engineering, design of information systems and facility planning. These same courses may be taken as fourth-year technical electives (schedule permitting). Therefore, students may use their fourth year electives to pursue their specialization further in depth, or to investigate other IE areas.
In fourth year, the central theme is the design and management of an organization as an integrated system. All students participate in an Integrated Systems Design course to design the business processes of an organization, and a Capstone Design course that requires students to draw on knowledge from all years of the IE program to tackle a real-world project with an industry partner. There is also a research thesis option.
Job opportunities for IE graduates are very diverse and offer challenging careers in a wide variety of industries, including consulting. Three prototypical jobs for new graduates include:
•    Manage an organizational supply chain to ensure new products can be successfully introduced into global sales channels.
•    Test the interaction features of a new software application.
•    Identify increased capacity requirements necessary to accommodate the expected surgical volume of hospitals.

FIRST YEAR INDUSTRIAL ENGINEERING

Fall Session - Year 1Lect.Lab.Tut.Wgt.
Core Required Courses
Engineering Strategies & Practice IAPS111H1F3110.50
Ethics in EngineeringAPS150H1F--10.05
MechanicsCIV100H1F3-20.50
Calculus IMAT186H1F3-10.50
Linear AlgebraMAT188H1F3-10.50
Introduction to Materials ScienceMSE101H1F3110.50
Winter Session - Year 1Lect.Lab.Tut.Wgt.
Core Required Courses
Fundamentals of Computer ProgrammingAPS106H1S3210.50
Engineering Strategies & Practice IIAPS112H1S32-0.50
Electrical FundamentalsECE110H1S3120.50
Calculus IIMAT187H1S3-10.50
DynamicsMIE100H1S3-20.50
Seminar Course: Introduction to Mechanical and Industrial EngineeringMIE191H1S1--0.15

SECOND YEAR INDUSTRIAL ENGINEERING

Fall Session - Year 2Lect.Lab.Tut.Wgt.
Core Required Courses
Probability MIE236H1F3-20.50
Psychology For EngineersMIE242H1F33-0.50
Fundamentals of Object Oriented ProgrammingMIE250H1F23-0.50
Engineering Economics and AccountingMIE258H1F3-10.50
Operations Research I: Deterministic ORMIE262H1F3210.50
Winter Session - Year 2Lect.Lab.Tut.Wgt.
Core Required Courses
Differential EquationsMAT234H1S3-1.500.50
Statistics MIE237H1S3120.50
Human Centred Systems DesignMIE240H1S3-20.50
Data ModellingMIE253H1S3110.50
Operations Research II: Stochastic ORMIE263H1S3-20.50

THIRD YEAR INDUSTRIAL ENGINEERING

Fall Session - Year 3Lect.Lab.Tut.Wgt.
Core Required Course
Industrial Ergonomics and the WorkplaceMIE343H1F33-0.50
Design and Analysis of Information SystemsMIE350H1F3110.50
Systems Modelling and SimulationMIE360H1F3210.50
Natural Science Elective (Choose One):
Engineering BiologyCHE353H1F3-10.50
Urban Engineering EcologyCIV220H1F3-10.50
Terrestrial Energy SystemsCIV300H1F/S3-20.50
Technical Elective (Choose One):
Case Studies in ErgonomicsMIE345H1F3-20.50
Business Process EngineeringMIE354H1F3110.50
Operations Research III: Advanced ORMIE365H1F3210.50
Complementary Studies Elective
CS ElectiveF 0.50
Winter Session - Year 3Lect.Lab.Tut.Wgt.
Core Required Course
Algorithms & Numerical MethodsMIE335H1S3110.50
Resource and Production ModellingMIE363H1S3-20.50
Quality Control and ImprovementMIE364H1S3120.50
Technical Elective (Choose One):
Ergonomic Design of Information SystemsMIE344H1S33-0.50
Cases in Operations ResearchMIE367H1S3-20.50
Facility PlanningMIE468H1S3-20.50
Reliability and Maintainability EngineeringMIE469H1S3-20.50
Complementary Studies Elective
CS ElectiveS 0.50
    1. Practical Experience Requirement - As described in the beginning pages of this chapter, students are required to have completed a total of 600 hours of acceptable practical experience before graduation (normally during their summer periods).
    2. At least two of the four (0.5 credit) Complementary Studies Electives to be taken between third and fourth year must be Humanities/Social Sciences courses (see the Complementary Studies section at the beginning of this chapter).  Students are responsible for ensuring that each elective taken is approved.  Please consult the electives list available on the Engineering Office of the Registrar's website.
    3. Students may choose an alternative Natural Science course to the three listed. A list of approved alternative Natural Science courses offered by the Faculty of Arts & Science is available on the Engineering Office of the Registrar's website.
PROFESSIONAL EXPERIENCE YEAR

Students registered within this program, and all other undergraduate programs within the Faculty of Applied Science and Engineering, may elect to enrol and participate in the Professional Experience Year (PEY) program.  The PEY program requires that qualified students undertake a paid, full-time 12-16 month continuous work period with a cooperating company.  Details are described in the beginning of this chapter.  For more information, consult the Professional Experience Year Office, 222 College Street, Suite 106 early in session 2F or 3F.

FOURTH YEAR INDUSTRIAL ENGINEERING

FOURTH YEAR INDUSTRIAL ENGINEERING

Fall Session - Year 4Lect.Lab.Tut.Wgt.
Core Required Courses:
Integrated System DesignMIE463H1F3-20.50
Capstone DesignMIE490Y1Y--41.00
Technical Electives (Choose Two):
Case Studies in ErgonomicsMIE345H1F3-20.50
Business Process EngineeringMIE354H1F3110.50
Operations Research III: Advanced ORMIE365H1F3210.50
Engineering Psychology and Human PerformanceMIE448H1F33-0.50
Decision Support SystemsMIE451H1F3110.50
Research ThesisMIE498H1F--40.50
Research ThesisMIE498Y1Y--41.00
SchedulingMIE562H1F3-20.50
Decision AnalysisMIE566H1F3-20.50
Complementary Studies Elective
CS ElectiveF/Y 0.50
Winter Session - Year 4Lect.Lab.Tut.Wgt.
Core Required Courses:
Organization DesignMIE459H1S4--0.50
Capstone DesignMIE490Y1Y--41.00
Technical Electives (Choose Two):
Ergonomic Design of Information SystemsMIE344H1S33-0.50
Cases in Operations ResearchMIE367H1S3-20.50
Knowledge Modelling and ManagementMIE457H1S3110.50
Facility PlanningMIE468H1S3-20.50
Reliability and Maintainability EngineeringMIE469H1S3-20.50
Research ThesisMIE498H1S--40.50
Research ThesisMIE498Y1Y--41.00
Human Factors IntegrationMIE542H1S3-20.50
Healthcare SystemsMIE561H1S3-20.50
Complementary Studies Elective
CS ElectiveS/Y 0.50
  1. The Department is not able to schedule all fourth-year courses without conflict.  However, students are required to select courses that allow for a conflict-free timetable.
  2. At least one technical elective in each of the 4F and 4W session must be chosen from the provided listings.  Students who want to take a technical elective substitute are required to obtain formal Departmental approval from the Undergraduate Office.
  3. Industrial Engineering students are required to complete a two-term Capstone Design project, MIE490Y1Y, supervised by a licensed member of the University of Toronto teaching staff.
  4. At least two of the four (0.5 credit) Complementary Studies Electives to be taken between third and fourth year must be Humanities/Social Sciences courses (see the Complementary Studies section at the beginning of this chapter).  Students are responsible for ensuring that each elective taken is approved.  Please consult the electives list available on the Engineering Office of the Regisrtar's website.


  1. The Department is not able to schedule all fourth-year courses without conflict.  However, students are required to select courses that allow for a conflict-free timetable.
  2. At least one technical elective in each of the 4F and 4W session must be chosen from the provided listings.  Students who want to take a technical elective substitute are required to obtain formal Departmental approval from the Undergraduate Office.
  3. Industrial Engineering students are required to complete a two-term Capstone Design project, MIE490Y1Y, supervised by a licensed member of the University of Toronto teaching staff.
  4. At least two of the four (0.5 credit) Complementary Studies Electives to be taken between third and fourth year must be Humanities/Social Sciences courses (see the Complementary Studies section at the beginning of this chapter).  Students are responsible for ensuring that each elective taken is approved.  Please consult the electives list available on the Engineering Office of the Regisrtar's website.

GRADUATE PROGRAM IN INDUSTRIAL ENGINEERING

The Department offers graduate study and research opportunities in a wide range of fields within Industrial Engineering.  These include human factors engineering, information engineering, management science, manufacturing, operations research, systems design and optimization, reliability and maintainability engineering.  Subject areas include: Queuing Theory, Cognitive Engineering, Human-Computer Interaction, Organizational Risk Management and Human Factors in Medicine.  The programs available lead to M.Eng., M.A.Sc. and Ph.D. degrees.  Evening courses are offered to accommodate participants who work full-time and are interested in an M.Eng.  Additional information can be obtained fromt he Mechanical and Industrial Engineering Graduate Studies Office online at www.mie.utoronto.ca/graduate.

MECHANICAL ENGINEERING (AEMECBASC)

UNDERGRADUATE STUDENT COUNSELLOR:
Ms Carla Baptista
Room MC109, Mechanical Engineering Building 
416-978-6420

The Mechanical Engineering profession faces unprecedented challenges and exciting opportunities in its efforts to serve the needs of society. The broad disciplinary base and design orientation of the field will continue to make the skills of the mechanical engineer crucial to the success of virtually all technical systems that involve energy, motion, materials, design, automation and manufacturing. The explosive growth in the availability of lower-cost, compact and high speed computing hardware and software is already revolutionizing the analysis, design, manufacture and operation of many mechanical engineering systems. Mechanical engineering systems are part of automotive engineering, robotics, fuel utilization, nuclear and thermal power generation, materials behaviour in design applications, transportation, biomechanical engineering, environmental control and many others.
To prepare Mechanical Engineers for the challenges of such a broad discipline, the program is designed to:
   (i) Provide fundamental knowledge of the various subdisciplines;
   (ii) Teach methodology and systems analysis techniques for integrating this knowledge into useful design concepts, and
   (iii)  Make graduates fully conversant with modern facilities, such as CAD/CAM and microprocessor control, by which design concepts can be produced and competitively manufactured.
 The knowledge component includes the key subdisciplines of mechanics, thermodynamics, fluid mechanics, control theory, dynamics, material science and design. All are based on adequate preparation in mathematics and in such fundamental subjects as physics and chemistry.
 Integration of this knowledge is accomplished in third and fourth year courses. Students select many upper-year courses from a list of electives, permitting them to choose subjects compatible with their individual interests. Most technical elective courses from one of five streams or subject areas: Manufacturing, Mechatronics, Solid Mechanics and Machine Design, Energy and Environment or Bioengineering. Students are encouraged to select a sequence of courses from two of the five streams, acquiring greater depth of knowledge in those areas.The fourth year Capstone Design course encompasses all aspects of the program as students complete a two-term design project for an industrial partner or client. Students also have the option of doing a one or two term thesis in the fourth year, allowing independent study and research with a university faculty member.
 With this diverse background, virtually all industries seek the services of the practicing mechanical engineer as an employee or a consultant. Mechanical engineers are involved in the primary power production industry where hydraulic, thermal and nuclear energy is converted to electricity; in integrated manufacturing of automobiles and other equipment; in aircraft and other transportation systems; in the heating and air conditioning industry; in the design and manufacture of electronic hardware; in materials processing plants and many others industries.
 For the modern mechanical engineer, the undergraduate program is only the first step in this educational process. An increasing number of graduates pursue advanced degrees in particular areas of specialization. Graduates entering industry can continue their education by participating in the graduate program. For further details please see the information following the program outline.

FIRST YEAR MECHANICAL ENGINEERING

Fall Session - Year 1Lect.Lab.Tut.Wgt.
Core Required Courses
Engineering Strategies & Practice IAPS111H1F3110.50
Ethics in EngineeringAPS150H1F--10.05
MechanicsCIV100H1F3-20.50
Calculus IMAT186H1F3-10.50
Linear AlgebraMAT188H1F3-10.50
Introduction to Materials ScienceMSE101H1F3110.50
Winter Session - Year 1Lect.Lab.Tut.Wgt.
Core Required Courses
Fundamentals of Computer ProgrammingAPS106H1S3210.50
Engineering Strategies & Practice IIAPS112H1S32-0.50
Electrical FundamentalsECE110H1S3120.50
Calculus IIMAT187H1S3-10.50
DynamicsMIE100H1S3-20.50
Seminar Course: Introduction to Mechanical and Industrial EngineeringMIE191H1S1--0.15

SECOND YEAR MECHANICAL ENGINEERING

Fall Session - Year 2Lect.Lab.Tut.Wgt.
Core Required Courses
Engineering AnalysisMIE230H1F3-20.50
Probability and Statistics with Engineering ApplicationsMIE231H1F3220.50
Engineering Economics and AccountingMIE258H1F3-10.50
Materials ScienceMSE270H1F30.751.500.50
Complementary Studies Elective
CS ElectiveF/Y 0.50
Winter Session - Year 2Lect.Lab.Tut.Wgt.
Core Required Courses
Differential EquationsMAT234H1S3-1.500.50
ThermodynamicsMIE210H1S31.5010.50
Manufacturing EngineeringMIE221H1S3210.50
Mechanics of Solids IMIE222H1S31.501.500.50
Foundations of Design PortfolioMIE297H1S---0.00
Complementary Studies Elective
CS ElectiveS/Y 0.50
PROFESSIONAL EXPERIENCE YEAR

Students registered within this program, and all other undergraduate programs within the Faculty of Applied Science and Engineering, may elect to enrol and participate in the Professional Experience Year (PEY) program.  The PEY program requires that qualified students undertake a paid, full-time 12-16 month continuous work period with a cooperating company.  Details are described in the beginning of this chapter.  For more information, consult the Professional Experience Year Office, 222 College Street, Suite 106 early in session 2F or 3F.

THIRD YEAR MECHANICAL ENGINEERING

Fall Session - Year 3Lect.Lab.Tut.Wgt.
Core Required Courses
Kinematics and Dynamics of MachinesMIE301H1F3320.50
Fluid Mechanics IMIE312H1F3110.50
Numerical Methods IMIE334H1F3-1.500.50
Circuits with Applications to Mechanical Engineering SystemsMIE342H1F31.5010.50
Design PortfolioMIE397Y1Y---0.00
Natural Science Elective (choose one):
Engineering BiologyCHE353H1F3-10.50
Urban Engineering EcologyCIV220H1F3-10.50
Terrestrial Energy SystemsCIV300H1F3-20.50
Winter Session - Year 3Lect.Lab.Tut.Wgt.
Core Required Courses
Design for the EnvironmentMIE315H1S3-10.50
Engineering PhysicsMIE333H1S3-1.500.50
Mechanical Engineering DesignMIE341H1S3310.50
Design PortfolioMIE397Y1Y---0.00
Stream Options (Choose two streams)
Manufacturing
Quality Control and ImprovementMIE364H1S3120.50
Mechatronics
Analog and Digital Electronics for MechatronicsMIE346H1S31.5010.50
Solid Mechanics & Design
Mechanics of Solids IIMIE320H1S31.5020.50
Energy and Environment
Heat and Mass TransferMIE313H1S31.5020.50
Bioengineering
Cellular and Molecular BiologyCHE354H1S3-20.50
Physiological Control SystemsMIE331H1S3110.50

1. In 4F, students will be required to take one additional course from each of the same two streams followed in third-year.
2. The Departments is not able to schedule all third-year, stream courses without conflict.  However, students are required to select courses that allow for a conflict-free timetable.
3. Students may choose an alternative Natural Science course to the three listed. A list of approved alternative Natural Science courses offered by the Faculty of Arts & Science is available on the Engineering Office of the Registrar's website.

BIOENGINEERING

Students who are interested in completing a minor (6 courses) in Bioengineering should consult the beginning of this chapter for more information, and should also meet with the Undergradaute Student Counsellor.  Students may complete this minor by the end of the fourth-year, Mechanical program by taking the following courses, however other combinations are possible:

FOURTH YEAR MECHANICAL ENGINEERING

Fall Session - Year 4Lect.Lab.Tut.Wgt.
Core Rquired Course:
Capstone DesignMIE491Y1Y--41.00
Stream Courses (two of):
Manufacturing
Automated ManufacturingMIE422H1F23-0.50
Mechatronics
Control Systems IMIE404H1F3320.50
Solid Mechanics & Design
Machine DesignMIE442H1F31.5030.50
Energy & Environment
Thermal Energy ConversionMIE411H1F33-0.50
Bioengineering
Biotransport PhenomenaMIE520H1F3-10.50
Technical Electives (one of):
AerodynamicsAER307H1F3-10.50
RoboticsAER525H1F31.5010.50
Operating SystemsECE344H1F33-0.50
Industrial Ergonomics and the WorkplaceMIE343H1F33-0.50
Systems Modelling and SimulationMIE360H1F3210.50
* Applied Fluid MechanicsMIE414H1F3310.50
* Design of Innovative ProductsMIE440H1F2210.50
* Mechatronics PrinciplesMIE444H1F23-0.50
Engineering Psychology and Human PerformanceMIE448H1F33-0.50
Research ThesisMIE498H1F--40.50
Research ThesisMIE498Y1Y--41.00
Alternative Energy SystemsMIE515H1F3-10.50
Combustion and FuelsMIE516H1F3-10.50
Introduction to Polymer EngineeringMSE330H1F3-10.50
Materials Selection in Design IIMSE401H1F2210.50
Complementary Studies Elective (one):
CS ElectiveF 0.50
Winter Session - Year 4Lect.Lab.Tut.Wgt.
Core Required Course:
Capstone DesignMIE491Y1Y--41.00
Technical Electives (three of):
Environmental Impact and Risk AssessmentCIV440H1S3-10.50
Biocomposites: Mechanics and BioinspirationCHE475H1S3-10.50
Operating SystemsECE344H1S33-0.50
Innovation and Manufacturing of Sustainable MaterialsFOR424H1S3--0.50
VibrationsMIE402H1S3120.50
Nuclear Reactor Theory and DesignMIE407H1S3-20.50
* Thermal and Machine Design of Nuclear Power ReactorsMIE408H1S3-20.50
Fluid Mechanics IIMIE418H1S2320.50
Microprocessors and Embedded MicrocontrollersMIE438H1S23-0.50
Biomechanics IMIE439H1S32-0.50
* Design OptimizationMIE441H1S32-0.50
* Mechatronics Systems: Design and IntegrationMIE443H1S3310.50
* Smart Materials and StructuresMIE464H1S32-0.50
Reliability and Maintainability EngineeringMIE469H1S3-20.50
Research ThesisMIE498H1S--40.50
Research ThesisMIE498Y1Y--41.00
* MEMS Design and MicrofabricationMIE506H1S31.5010.50
Fuel Cell SystemsMIE517H1S3-10.50
* Product DesignMIE540H1S3-10.50
Surgical and Dental Implant DesignMSE442H1S3-10.50
Complementary Studies Elective (one):
CS ElectiveS 0.50

1. In 4F, students must take one required course (indicated above) from each of the same two streams followed in 3W.
2. Students are required to include at least one of the engineering design courses marked with a star (*) during the fourth year.  It may be taken in either 4F or 4W.
3. In 4F, students may select an additional course from the Stream Courses list (above) to substitute for the technical elective.
4. Students may take only one of MIE422H1 (Automated Manufacturing) or AER525H1 (Robotics). AER525H1 (Robotics) is Limited Enrolment.
5. The Department is not able to schedule all fourth-year courses without conflict.  However, students are required to select courses that allow for a conflict-free timetable.
6. Students are permitted to take at most two technical elective substitutes in their fourth-year, but are required to obtain formal Departmental approval from the Undergraduate Office.
7. At least two of the four (0.5 credit) Complementary Studies Electives to be taken between second and fourth year must he Humanities/Social Sciences courses (see the Complementary Studies section at the beginning of this chapter).  An equivalent 1.0 course is also acceptable.  Students are responsible for ensuring that each elective taken is approved.  Please consult the electives list available on the Engineering Office of the Registrar's website.

GRADUATE PROGRAM IN MECHANICAL ENGINEERING

The Department offers graduate study and research opportunities in a wide range of fields within Mechanical Engineering.  These include applied mechanics, biomedical engineering, computer aided engineering, energy studies, fluid mechanics and hydraulics, materials, manufacturing, robotics, automotion and control, design, surface sciences, thermodynamics and heat transfer, plasma processing, vibration, computational fluid dynamics, microfluidics and micromechanics, environmental engineering, thermal spray coatings, finite element methods, internal combustion engines and spray-forming processes.  The programs available lead to M.Eng., M.A.Sc. and Ph.D. degrees.  Evening courses are offered to accommodate participants who work full-time and are interested in an M.Eng.  Additional information can be obtained from the Mechanical and Industrial Engineering Graduate Studies Office online at www.mie.utoronto.ca/graduate.

Mineral Engineering

LASSONDE MINERAL ENGINEERING PROGRAM (AELMEBASC)
UNDERGRADUATE STUDENT COUNSELLORS:
Shayni Curtis-Clarke
Room GB105, Galbraith Building, 416-978-5905
E-mail: shayni@ecf.utoronto.ca

Teresa Miniaci
Room MB129, Lassonde Mining Building, 416-946-4095
Email: miniaci@ecf.utoronto.ca

UNDERGRADUATE STUDENT ADVISORS:
Professor John Hadjigeorgiou, Director, Lassonde Mineral Engineering Program

Nelly Pietropaolo
Room GB105, Galbraith Building

Mineral engineering encompasses those activities necessary to extract and process natural mineral resources. The Lassonde Mineral Engineering Program is comprehensive, covering topics from the entire scope of minerals engineering: from geology and mineral exploration, through analysis and design of surface and underground excavations, mechanical and explosive excavation of geological materials, planning and management of mines and quarries, processing of metallic, non‑metallic and industrial minerals, safety and environmental protection, and on to financial aspects of minerals operations. This wide range of topics means that the program is truly interdisciplinary, using concepts and techniques from mathematics, physics, chemistry, geology and economics; in the setting of the University of Toronto it is thus both interdepartmental and interfaculty, with the Departments of Civil Engineering, Geology and Materials Science and Engineering contributing to the program. As Toronto is a world centre for mining and mining finance, the program is able to maintain close links with the minerals industry, and thus invites recognised experts from various branches of the industry to deliver state-of-the-art treatment of specialised topics within the curriculum.

The first year of the four-year curriculum is similar to that of other engineering programs at the University. All subsequent years are unique to the Lassonde Mineral Engineering Program, with transfer into Year 2 of Mineral Engineering being permitted from both the General Engineering first year and other engineering programs. Year 2 concentrates on minerals engineering fundamentals, and years 3 and 4 comprise a minerals engineering core supplemented by technical electives. A wide range of technical electives are available, thereby allowing students to specialise should they so wish in one particular branch of minerals engineering. Students also study humanities and complementary studies electives in the final two years. Practical aspects of the program are presented through laboratory sessions, and students attend one survey and one geology field camp, each of two weeks duration. Students are encouraged and helped to obtain industrial experience during summer vacations, and have the opportunity to take a Professional Experience Year between years 3 and 4. Attractive entrance and in-course scholarships and bursaries are available, including the prestigious, competitively awarded Lassonde Scholarships.

Graduates obtain a comprehensive training in minerals engineering, and are well prepared for future challenges in the planning and financing of mineral and related engineering projects as well as for graduate study in mining, geological, or civil engineering. The program is accredited with the Canadian Engineering Accreditation Board.

PERSONAL PROTECTIVE EQUIPMENT

There will be many occasions where students are required to use Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) including safety footwear bearing the CSA Green Patch, hard hats, protective eyewear with side shields, tear away safety vests and ear protection.  Students are required to purchase their own PPE.  All field trips, laboratories, and other events require advance briefing on the nature of potential hazards and students are required to attend these briefings and to follow the provided instructions.

PRACTICAL EXPERIENCE REQUIREMENT

Students are required to have completed at least 600 hours of acceptable practical experience before graduation.  This is normally acquired during the summer vacation periods or during a Professional Experience Year (PEY) internship.

PROFESSIONAL EXPERIENCE YEAR
Students registered within this program, and all other undergraduate programs within the Faculty of Applied Science and Engineering, may elect to enrol and participate in the Professional Experience Year (PEY) program.  The PEY program requires that qualified students undertake a paid, full-time 12-16 month continuous work period with a cooperating company.  Details are described in the beginning of this chapter.  For more information, consult the Professional Experience Year Office, 222 College Street, Suite 106 early in session 2F or 3F.
SUMMER FIELD CAMP

An August Field Camp must be completed by all Lassonde Mineral Engineering students in the summer before Fourth Year.  Results of the course are used to compute the Fourth Year Fall Session average.  An extra fee is charged to cover part of the cost of transportation, food, and accommodation.

MINORS AND CERTIFICATE PROGRAMS

Several Engineering Minors and Certificate Programs are available and generally require the student to successfully complete a carefully selected slate of electives in their Fourth Year.  Late in the Third Year Winter Session, students use an on-line pre-registration tool to indicate their preferred fourth-year electives.  Students should review the various minor and certificate program requirements and attend the department's information sessions in Third Year to ensure that the appropriate electives are taken in Fourth Year.  Students should note that they can also complete the requirements of a minor or certificate program even after they have graduated, as long as the additional requirements are met within nine years of their initial registration in the BASc program.  If completed after graduation, additional fees will be assessed, and a transcript will be issued with the amended courses and indication of completed minor or certificate program requirements.

JEFFREY SKOLL BASC/MBA PROGRAM

The Jeffrey Skoll Combined BASc/MBA Program allows qualified and selected students in the Faculty of Applied Science and Engineering to complete both a BASc and an MBA in a reduced time.  Students will be admitted to the program prior to entering their fourth year of studies in the BASc program.  Interested students should contact the Registrar's Office early in the Third Year to obtain important information including application deadlines.

GRADUATE TRAINING IN MINERAL ENGINEERING

Students with the necessary qualifications (generally at least a B+ average in the final year of the undergraduate program) who wish to proceed to graduate studies may do so through the Lassonde Institute, an interdisciplinary research institute for engineering geoscience.  The Department of Civil Engineering, the Department of Mechanical Engineering, the Department of Materials Science and Engineering, the Department of Geology, and the Collaborative Program in Geophysics are all collaborators in the Lassonde Institute.

The Engineering Departments offer programs leading to the MASc, MEng, and PhD degrees.  Other Departments offer MSc and PhD degree programs.  Additional information may be obtained at www.lassondeinstitute.utoronto.ca or the websites of the collaborating Departments.

FIRST YEAR MINERAL ENGINEERING

Fall Session - Year 1Lect.Lab.Tut.Wgt.
Engineering Strategies & Practice IAPS111H1F3110.50
Ethics in EngineeringAPS150H1F--10.05
Physical ChemistryCHE112H1F3110.50
MechanicsCIV100H1F3-20.50
Calculus IMAT186H1F3-10.50
Linear AlgebraMAT188H1F3-10.50
Winter Session - Year 1Lect.Lab.Tut.Wgt.
Fundamentals of Computer ProgrammingAPS106H1S3210.50
Engineering Strategies & Practice IIAPS112H1S32-0.50
Earth Systems ScienceCME185H1S3210.50
Calculus IIMAT187H1S3-10.50
Introduction to Materials ScienceMSE101H1S3110.50

SECOND YEAR MINERAL ENGINEERING

Fall Session - Year 2Lect.Lab.Tut.Wgt.
Solid Mechanics ICME210H1F31.501.500.50
Engineering Mathematics ICME261H1F3110.50
Fluid Mechanics ICME270H1F31.5010.50
Minerals and RocksESS221H1F23-0.50
Introduction to the Resource IndustriesMIN225H1F3210.50
Winter Session - Year 2Lect.Lab.Tut.Wgt.
Probability Theory for Civil and Mineral EngineersCME263H1S3-20.50
Engineering Mathematics IICME362H1S3-20.50
PetrologyESS222H1S23-0.50
Surface MiningMIN250H1S3-10.50
Complementary Studies Elective (CS) / Humanities and Social Sciences Elective (HSS)S 0.50

Students must acquire two half or one full-year course equivalent of both CS and HSS credits by the end of Fourth Year.

THIRD YEAR MINERAL ENGINEERING

Fall Session - Year 3Lect.Lab.Tut.Wgt.
Geotechnical Engineering ICME321H1F30.5010.50
Survey CAMP (Civil and Mineral Practicals)CME358H1F---0.50
Engineering Economics and Decision MakingCME368H1F3-10.50
Geologic Structures and MapsESS241H1F23-0.50
Engineering Rock MechanicsMIN429H1F3-10.50
ThermodynamicsMSE202H1F3-20.50
Winter Session - Year 3Lect.Lab.Tut.Wgt.
Explosives and Fragmentation in MiningMIN320H1S3-10.50
Underground MiningMIN351H1S3-10.50
Mining Environmental ManagementMIN430H1S3-10.50
Mineral ProcessingMSE301H1S31.5010.50
Complementary Studies Elective (CS) / Humanities and Social Sciences Elective (HSS)S 0.50

CME358H1 - Survey CAMP (Civil and Mineral Practicals), is a two-week field-based course taken in the month prior to starting Third Year.  The results of this course are used in computing the student's Third Year Fall Session Average.  An extra fee is charged to cover part of the costs of food and accommodation.
Technical Electives must be chosen from the list shown under the Fourth Year curriculum table.
Students must acquire two half or one full-year course equivalent of both CS and HSS credits by the end of Fourth Year.

FOURTH YEAR MINERAL ENGINEERING

Fall Session - Year 4Lect.Lab.Tut.Wgt.
Mineral Project Design IMIN466H1F2210.50
Mineral EconomicsMIN450H1F3-10.50
Complementary Studies Elective (CS) / Humanities and Social Sciences Elective (HSS)F/Y 0.50
Field Camp
Geology Field Camp for EngineersMIN400H1F---0.50
Choose two of the following Technical Electives
Aqueous Process EngineeringCHE565H1F3-10.50
Groundwater Flow and ContaminationCIV549H1F3-10.50
Sedimentation and StratigraphyESS331H1F23-0.50
Mineral DepositsESS423H1F23-0.50
Environmental and Archaeological GeophysicsJGA305H1F21-0.50
Integrated Mine Waste EngineeringMIN511H1F3-10.50
Winter Session - Year 4Lect.Lab.Tut.Wgt.
Mineral Project Design IIMIN467H1S1410.50
Design and Support of Underground Mine ExcavationsMIN565H1S3-10.50
Mineral Reserve and Mineral Resource EstimationMIN401H1S3-10.50
Ventilation and Occupational HealthMIN470H1S3-10.50
Complementary Studies Elective (CS) / Humanities and Social Sciences Elective (HSS)S/Y 0.50
Technical Electives
Geotechnical Engineering IICIV324H1S3110.50
Environmental Impact and Risk AssessmentCIV440H1S3-10.50
Geotechnical DesignCIV523H1S3-10.50
Borehole Geophysics for Engineers and GeoscientistsMIN540H1S3-10.50
1Note: students who took MIN401H1 or MIN470H1 in 2012-2013 are to select a Technical Elective from list above to replace MIN401H1 or MIN470H1.